Latest release

Jobs in Australia

Provides useful annual information about the number and nature of filled jobs in Australia, the people who hold them and their employers

Reference period
2011-12 to 2016-17
Released
1/08/2019
Next release 10/12/2020

Key statistics

  • There were 19.2 million job relationships, up 3.6% on 2015-16.
  • Jobs increased in 84.6% of Australia’s 2,288 regions.
  • 15.6% of employed people (2.1 million) were multiple job holders.

Main features

Table 1- Australia

 NumberChange in last yearChange in last 6 years
Jobs19,166,4203.6%6.4%
 Held by men9,958,7183.3%5.1%
 Held by women9,207,7023.9%7.9%
Employed persons13,535,4142.1%5.4%
Median employee income per job (duration adjusted)$43,1890.4%11.4%
Total employment income$801 bil3.1%19.1%
* 'Duration adjusted' is an analytical measure of employee income per job that seeks to put all jobs onto a comparable full-year duration basis.
 
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Jobs

During 2016-17:

  • there were 19.2 million job relationships.
  • 17.2 million (89.5%) jobs were employees and 2.0 million (10.5%) jobs were owner managers.
  • 14.3 million (74.8%) were private sector jobs and 3.2 million (17.0%) were public sector jobs.
     

Employed people

During 2016-17:

  • people aged 25-29 years held the highest number of employee jobs (2.6 million jobs).
  • males in this age group held a slightly higher proportion of jobs than females (52.2% and 47.8%).
     
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Employee income

After adjusting for the duration of the job, in 2016-17, the median employee income per job was:

  • $43,189 for all persons
  • $52,676 for males
  • $34,862 for females
     
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Multiple job holders

A multiple job holder is a person who held more than one employee job at the same time, rather than one after another, during the year.

During 2016-17:

  • approximately 15.6% of employed people (2.1 million) were multiple job holders
  • close to four out of five employed people held only one job
  • of the 2.1 million multiple job holders, 53.7% were female
     

Industry

During 2016-17, the industries with the most jobs were:

  • Health care and social assistance (10.4%)
  • Retail trade (8.7%)
  • Administrative and support services (8.6%)
     
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Occupation

During 2016-17, the most common occupations were:

  • Professionals (18.2%)
  • Clerical and Administrative Workers (11.5%)
  • Managers (10.7%)
     

Differences in male and female employment in occupations continue to be apparent. Almost all jobs worked by machinery operators and drivers were held by males (89.6%), while most clerical and administrative jobs were held by females (76.5%).

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Employers

During 2016-17:

  • 29.2% of employee jobs were with small businesses (less than 20 employees) (5.6 million jobs)
  • 21.9% were with medium businesses (between 20 and 199 employees) (4.2 million jobs)
  • 40.7% were with large businesses (200 or more employees) (7.8 million jobs)
     

Table 2 - Regional comparison

 Highest number of jobsHighest median employee
income per job
Highest total employment
income (million)
New
South
Wales
Sydney
- Haymarket
- The Rocks
62,052St Leonards
- Naremburn
$73,500Mosman$2,528
Waterloo
- Beaconsfield
33,285Balmain$71,254Double Bay
- Bellevue Hill
$1,881
Parramatta
- Rosehill
30,185North Sydney
- Lavender Bay
$70,570Lane Cove
- Greenwich
$1,860
Bondi Beach
- North Bondi
27,848Lilyfield
- Rozelle
$69,542Sydney
- Haymarket
- The Rocks
$1,810
VictoriaMelbourne43,532Port Melbourne$66,591Richmond$1,727
St Kilda35,054Newport$56,665Brighton$1,456
Richmond34,037Yarraville$56,148Kew$1,395
Tarneit30,080Richmond$55,286St Kilda$1,363
QueenslandUpper Coomera
- Willow Vale
26,556Weipa$67,215North Lakes
- Mango Hill
$1,117
North Lakes
- Mango Hill
26,453Moranbah$63,443Upper Coomera
- Willow Vale
$998
Surfers Paradise24,948Bulimba$59,191Forest Lake
- Doolandella
$913
Forest Lake
- Doolandella
23,351Boyne Island
- Tannum Sands
$58,656The Hills District$909
South
Australia
Plympton19,498Roxby Downs$73,354Unley
- Parkside
$844
Northgate
- Oakden
- Gilles Plains
17,839Blackwood$49,252Goodwood
- Millswood
$748
Seaford16,639Nailsworth
- Broadview
$48,290Glenelg$741
Glenelg16,529Largs Bay
- Semaphore
$48,156Burnside
- Wattle Park
$738
Western
Australia
Perth City42,767Ashburton (WA)$77,174Perth City$1,973
Ellenbrook31,029Port Hedland$75,762Ellenbrook$1,368
Baldivis29,103South Hedland$63,681Baldivis$1,345
Rivervale
- Kewdale
- Cloverdale
23,224North Coogee$63,360Nedlands
- Dalkeith
- Crawley
$1,137
TasmaniaSandy Bay10,351Geilston Bay
- Risdon
$46,767Sandy Bay$447
Devonport10,106Howrah
- Tranmere
$46,093Howrah
- Tranmere
$348
Kingston
- Huntingfield
8,721Old Beach - Otago$45,869Kingston Beach
- Blackmans Bay
$333
Hobart8,298Cambridge$44,572Kingston
- Huntingfield
$328
Northern
Territory
Darwin City12,298Durack
- Marlow Lagoon
$61,724Darwin City$531
Katherine11,392Palmerston - North$60,552Humpty Doo$397
Charles11,232Lyons (NT)$60,420Katherine$379
Humpty Doo8,308Rosebery
- Bellamack
$59,364Rosebery
- Bellamack
$330
Australian
Capital
Territory
Kambah12,232Barton$77,725Kambah$596
Ngunnawal9,470Kingston (ACT)$73,271Ngunnawal$427
Harrison7,114Forde$68,681Harrison$351
Gordon (ACT)6,725Deakin$66,848Kingston (ACT)$356

Note:

  • Analysis only includes areas with a population of more than 1,000 people.
  • Regional areas include the 4 highest Statistical Area Level 2s (SA2s) with relevant characteristics.
     

The job counts in this publication differ from the filled job estimates from other data sources such as the Australian Labour Account and the Labour Force Australia. The Jobs in Australia data sourced from LEED provides insights into all jobs held throughout the year, while the Labour Account data provides the number of filled jobs at a point-in-time each quarter, and Labour Force Survey data measures the number of people employed each month.

Multiple job holders in Australia

In Australia there were 2.1 million multiple job holders during the 2016-17 financial year. These were people who worked two or more jobs at the same time, at some point during the year.

The multiple job holder rate is the proportion of workers with multiple jobs in comparison to the number of employed people. The multiple job holder rate increased slightly from 14.4% in 2011-12 to 15.6% in 2016-17.

Of all the multiple job holders in 2016-17, 72.6% held two jobs, 19.4% held three jobs, and the remainder held four or more jobs.

Females were more likely to be multiple job holders than males. In 2016-17, 53.7% of multiple job holders were female and 46.3% were male. The multiple job holding rate for females (17.5%) was higher than that for males (13.8%).

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People under the age of 30 were more likely to be multiple job holders. Of all the multiple job holders in 2016-17, 11.9% were aged under 21; 15.0% were aged between 21-24; and 16.0% were aged between 25-29. This compares with 2011-12, where 12.5% were aged under 21; 14.8% aged between 21-24; and 15.4% aged between 25-29.

For females, multiple job holding rates were highest for those aged 18-20, which matches the highest age bracket for males in 2016-17. For both males and females, rates were lowest for those aged 85 and over and 80-84 respectively (Table 1).

Table 1 - Number of multiple job holders by age, 2016-17

        Total employed
               ('000)
   Multiple job holders
             ('000)
Multiple job holding rate*
                (%)
 MaleFemalePersonsMaleFemalePersonsMaleFemalePersons
Age group
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14 years
and under
8.5
10.6
19.1
0.4
0.6
1.0
5.1
5.7
5.5
15-17
134.1
157.1
291.1
19.7
26.7
46.4
14.7
17.0
15.9
18-20
349.1
341.5
690.6
90.2
111.9
202.1
25.8
32.8
29.3
21-24
606.5
561.7
1,168.2
146.1
169.0
315.1
24.1
30.1
27.0
25-29
850.7
784.5
1,635.2
164.5
172.0
336.5
19.3
21.9
20.6
30-34
842.7
752.4
1,595.1
127.6
126.5
254.1
15.1
16.8
15.9
35-39
757.4
660.9
1,418.3
94.9
99.2
194.1
12.5
15.0
13.7
40-44
709.4
644.3
1,353.7
79.1
96.4
175.6
11.2
15.0
13.0
45-49
706.8
670.8
1,377.6
73.7
101.5
175.1
10.4
15.1
12.7
50-54
641.5
609.7
1,251.2
62.9
88.9
151.8
9.8
14.6
12.1
55-59
588.4
551.0
1,139.4
53.3
72.9
126.2
9.1
13.2
11.1
60-64
437.7
382.7
820.5
36.8
42.3
79.1
8.4
11.1
9.6
65-69
243.9
188.8
432.7
16.8
15.1
31.9
6.9
8.0
7.4
70-74
109.1
76.0
185.2
6.1
4.5
10.6
5.6
5.9
5.7
75-79
45.9
35.7
81.5
1.9
1.4
3.3
4.1
4.1
4.1
80-84
22.6
19.5
42.1
0.6
0.7
1.3
2.8
3.6
3.2
85 & over
14.8
18.8
33.6
0.4
0.7
1.1
2.4
4.0
3.3
Total
7,069.2
6,466.2
13,535.4
975.0
1,130.3
2,105.3
13.8
17.5
15.6
Note: The multiple job holding rate is calculated as the percentage of multiple job holders over the total number employed.

 

Across the jurisdictions, the Northern Territory had the highest rate of multiple job holding, at 19.1%, while South Australia reported the lowest (14.9%) during 2016-17. The Northern Territory had the highest rate in 2011-12, and New South Wales had the lowest (Table 2c).

Table 2a - Number of employed persons by state, 2011-12 to 2016-17

               Employed persons  ('000) 
 2011-122012-132013-142014-152015-162016-17
NSW
4,034.6
4,063.6
4,095.1
4,132.0
4,204.3
4,329.8
Vic
3,172.1
3,202.4
3,238.9
3,273.3
3,340.1
3,433.8
Qld
2,609.0
2,628.3
2,632.4
2,635.0
2,654.4
2,710.2
SA
895.9
896.4
900.3
893.8
891.0
899.6
WA
1,442.4
1,486.6
1,491.9
1,486.4
1,467.3
1,454.9
Tas
269.9
266.7
266.7
267.6
269.9
275.1
NT
131.9
135.2
138.0
137.8
137.4
138.6
ACT
237.6
239.5
238.6
239.0
242.3
249.2
Total
12,843.8
12,965.8
13,050.0
13,111.4
13,262.5
13,535.4

Table 2b - Number of multiple job holders by state, 2011-12 to 2016-17

            Multiple job holders ('000) 
 2011-122012-132013-142014-152015-162016-17
NSW
560.2
657.9
632.8
608.7
600.0
661.7
Vic
461.2
487.4
491.2
495.9
493.7
543.6
Qld
376.0
397.3
394.4
414.0
387.5
421.0
SA
127.2
136.4
134.2
129.9
123.5
133.6
WA
219.8
237.8
234.0
232.0
216.6
228.8
Tas
41.7
42.1
43.6
43.8
42.5
46.4
NT
24.1
26.7
25.9
26.8
24.8
26.5
ACT
35.1
46.3
34.3
35.8
36.4
39.5
Total
1,849.0
2,036.0
1,994.4
1,990.6
1,929.4
2,105.3

Table 2c - Rate of multiple job holding by state, 2011-12 to 2016-17

        Multiple job holding rate (%) 
 2011-122012-132013-142014-152015-162016-17
NSW
13.9
16.2
15.5
14.7
14.3
15.3
Vic
14.5
15.2
15.2
15.2
14.8
15.8
Qld
14.4
15.1
15.0
15.7
14.6
15.5
SA
14.2
15.2
14.9
14.5
13.9
14.9
WA
15.2
16.0
15.7
15.6
14.8
15.7
Tas
15.5
15.8
16.4
16.4
15.7
16.9
NT
18.3
19.7
18.8
19.4
18.1
19.1
ACT
14.8
19.4
14.4
15.0
15.0
15.8
Total
14.4
15.7
15.3
15.2
14.6
15.6

A multiple job holders’ first concurrent job is the one in which they earn the most income. The most common industry of first concurrent job was Health care and social assistance (14.4%), and almost four out of every five of these workers were female. The second concurrent job is the highest income job held at the same time as the first concurrent job. The largest share of these were in the Administrative and support services (14.2%), with these being shared by male and female multiple job holders (55.6% males and 44.4% females).

In their first concurrent job, female multiple job holders were most likely to work in Health care and social assistance (240,000 female multiple job holders), Education and training (161,600), or Retail trade (127,500), while male multiple job holders were most likely to work in Administrative and support services (130,200 male multiple job holders), Construction (111,400), or Accommodation and food services (91,900).

Table 3 - Industry of first and second concurrent job, 2016-17

                            Number of multiple job holders ('000) 
 ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTotal
A
22.4
0.2
2.2
0.1
2.1
1.7
2.5
4.2
1.7
0.1
0.9
0.9
1.6
6.3
1.1
1.5
1.1
0.8
1.0
53.0
B
0.5
1.4
0.6
0.1
1.6
0.2
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.1
0.9
0.3
1.3
3.5
0.8
0.6
0.3
0.3
0.9
15.2
C
3.5
0.4
11.7
0.3
5.8
3.6
8.5
9.5
2.6
0.7
4.0
1.5
4.8
18.3
3.5
3.7
3.0
2.3
3.4
92.2
D
0.3
0.1
0.3
0.5
0.7
0.2
0.6
0.6
0.5
0.1
0.6
0.2
0.7
2.1
0.9
0.5
0.2
0.3
0.4
9.6
E
2.9
1.1
5.5
0.7
35.3
2.7
7.8
8.2
3.2
0.7
12.6
2.9
6.3
22.5
4.5
4.2
2.8
2.8
6.9
135.2
F
2.4
0.2
3.6
0.2
2.8
7.3
8.9
5.9
2.2
0.8
2.1
1.3
4.4
10.6
2.5
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.9
65.1
G
3.2
0.3
7.2
0.3
6.7
9.5
54.9
30.0
4.1
2.6
4.9
4.0
12.0
21.5
7.6
15.1
11.2
7.4
6.3
210.4
H
4.3
0.2
6.0
0.2
4.8
4.0
21.2
89.6
3.2
1.7
3.6
4.5
9.0
22.9
4.2
10.3
8.0
8.2
4.7
212.9
I
2.1
0.4
2.1
0.3
3.0
1.7
4.6
4.7
13.3
0.5
2.4
1.2
2.6
10.8
3.3
2.7
1.8
1.6
1.8
61.5
J
0.1
0.0
0.5
0.0
0.7
0.5
2.3
2.0
0.3
7.0
0.7
0.6
2.8
3.1
1.2
2.3
0.8
1.3
0.6
27.0
K
0.9
0.3
1.9
0.2
2.7
1.5
6.1
5.0
1.4
0.8
8.6
1.3
5.3
7.8
4.4
4.8
4.9
1.9
1.8
62.2
L
1.0
0.2
1.0
0.1
2.5
1.0
3.7
5.2
1.1
0.6
1.6
7.6
2.4
5.4
1.6
2.0
2.0
1.3
1.2
41.8
M
1.8
0.8
3.5
0.4
5.6
3.4
11.1
10.7
1.9
2.8
5.5
2.4
28.9
17.9
10.0
13.7
6.3
3.6
3.9
135.4
N
6.7
1.9
9.7
1.1
13.4
5.9
14.4
20.2
7.1
2.4
6.1
3.6
14.0
73.9
9.7
10.1
14.2
4.7
5.7
227.1
O
1.2
0.2
1.4
0.3
3.2
1.0
6.1
5.1
1.9
1.0
3.4
1.1
6.3
12.7
26.0
11.9
9.2
4.5
3.0
99.9
P
1.7
0.2
2.3
0.2
3.3
1.9
11.3
9.7
1.9
2.1
4.6
1.6
9.9
12.3
28.4
101.7
19.3
7.8
6.9
228.2
Q
1.9
0.2
3.0
0.2
3.6
2.5
14.7
13.6
2.1
1.2
9.1
2.5
9.5
34.2
14.3
31.3
143.1
5.1
8.6
302.7
R
0.6
0.0
0.9
0.1
1.1
0.8
3.7
6.4
0.6
1.1
0.8
0.8
2.3
4.3
2.4
5.6
2.1
8.5
1.6
44.0
S
1.2
0.2
2.0
0.1
2.6
1.5
5.6
5.6
1.3
0.6
1.9
1.1
3.6
6.8
3.7
6.6
6.1
2.2
11.3
64.9
Total
59.0
8.3
65.8
5.4
102.6
51.5
190.0
238.6
51.3
27.2
74.6
39.9
128.8
299.4
130.7
232.5
240.5
66.9
72.3
2,105.3
Note: In Table 3 above, the rows represent industry of first concurrent job, and the columns represent the industry of second concurrent job. For the full industry names, refer to Attachment 1.

 

The median total employment income of multiple job holders was $40,500. Those with a maximum of two concurrent jobs recorded a median employment income of $41,400, while people with 3 jobs and 4 or more jobs had lower median employment incomes ($38,600 and $38,000 respectively).

The highest median employee incomes for first concurrent jobs were in Mining ($66,200), followed by Electricity, gas, water and waste services ($49,700). The Mining industry also recorded the highest median employee income for second jobs ($16,800), followed by Electricity, gas, water and waste services ($9,400).

The lowest median employee incomes for first concurrent jobs were in Accommodation and food services ($13,800), closely followed by Agriculture, forestry and fishing ($14,100). Public administration and safety and Education and training had the lowest median employee incomes for second jobs, at $2,000 and $2,800 respectively.

While some second concurrent jobs (49.6%) were held for the entire year, many were not. Of those held for less than an entire year, the median duration was 22 weeks. Results show that multiple job holders worked the same duration in their second concurrent job in 2016-17 and 2011-12, when the median duration was also 22 weeks.

For more information on multiple job holders, refer to Table 4 in the Data downloads section of the Jobs in Australia publication.

It is worth noting that the job counts in this publication differ from the filled job estimates from other data sources such as the Australian Labour Account and the Labour Force Australia. The Jobs in Australia data sourced from Linked Employer Employee Dataset (LEED) provide insights into all job relationships that were held throughout the year, while the Labour Account and Labour Force Survey provide point-in-time data each quarter.

The LEED is a very rich dataset, containing over 100 million individual records which provide annual demographic, geographic and financial information from 2011-12 through to 2016-17. This allows for micro-economic analysis of multiple job holders.

Notes

1. A concurrent job is a job which overlapped with another job by at least 31 days at some point during the financial year.

2. In this publication, the main job held by a person is the job in which they received the highest employment income. Using income or earnings to identify a person's main job differs from ABS household surveys, which define a person's main job as the job in which the most hours are usually worked.

3. While a person may own and manage more than one enterprise, due to data limitations, only one self-employment job can be recorded for any owner manager of unincorporated enterprises (OMUE), however they can hold other jobs as an employee.

Attachment 1: Industry division names

A - Agriculture, forestry and fishing
B - Mining
C - Manufacturing
D - Electricity, gas, water and waste services
E - Construction
F - Wholesale trade
G - Retail trade
H - Accommodation and food services
I - Transport, postal and warehousing
J - Information media and telecommunications
K - Financial and insurance services
L - Rental, hiring and real estate services
M - Professional, scientific and technical services
N - Administrative and support services
O - Public administration and safety
P - Education and training
Q - Health care and social assistance
R - Arts and recreation services
S - Other services

Jobs in New South Wales

This feature article presents information for the New South Wales Greater Capital City Statistical Areas (the Greater Sydney region, and the Rest of New South Wales) (footnote 1).

Number of employed persons and jobs

In 2016-17, around 2,913,100 people in the Greater Sydney region were employed at some point during the year, who worked across 4,089,300 jobs (footnote 2). The number of employed people increased by 3.5% over the past 12 months, and increased by 9.4% over the previous six years. The number of jobs reflected similar results (up 5.1% and 12.8%, respectively) in the Greater Sydney region.

Of the people employed, 2,477,000 people (85.0%) were single job holders, while 436,000 people (15.0%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. This trend has been consistent over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 85.5% and multiple job holders averaging 14.5% in the Greater Sydney region.

In comparison, there were 1,415,700 employed people in the Rest of New South Wales during 2016-17, which represents an increase of 3.0% from the previous year, and 3.5% from 2011-12. These people worked across 2,004,700 jobs during the year, which reflects a 4.8% increase from 2015-16 and a 4.5% increase from 2011-12 in the number of jobs. The number of jobs was higher in Greater Sydney compared to the Rest of New South Wales (67.1% and 32.9% respectively). This proportion has been relatively stable over the past six years.

In the Rest of New South Wales, 1,190,100 people (84.1%) were single job holders, while 225,600 people (15.9%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. As in the Greater Sydney region, the majority of people worked one job at a time during a year over the past six years. Over this period, single job holders averaged 84.3% whilst multiple job holders averaged 15.7% in the Rest of New South Wales.

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Across Australia, there were 13.5 million employed people in 2016-17 who worked across 19.2 million jobs during the year. The number of employed people has continued to grow at the national level over the time series (up 2.1% from 2015-16 and up 5.4% from 2011-12). This is also true for the number of jobs worked in Australia (up 3.6% from 2015-16 and up 6.4% from 2011-12).

Of the people employed across Australia, 84.4% of people were single job holders compared to 15.6% who held multiple jobs at the same time throughout 2016-17. This proportion has remained stable over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 85.0% and multiple job holders averaging 15.0%.

Jobs by gender

In the Greater Sydney region, the number of jobs held by males increased by 4.7%, and the number of jobs held by females increased by 5.6% over the past 12 months. Similarly in the Rest of the New South Wales, the number of jobs held by both males and females also grew (up by 4.2% and 5.5% respectively) over the same period.

Compared to 2011-12, the number of jobs held by both males and females increased (up 11.8% and 13.9% respectively) in the Greater Sydney region. In the Rest of New South Wales, the number of jobs held by both males and females also increased (up 2.5% and 6.7% respectively). Nationally, the increase in the number of jobs was a result of growth in jobs by both males and females over the previous 12 months and six years. The growth rate in the number of jobs held by females was greater than males over the time series (7.9% and 5.1% respectively).

In both the Greater Sydney and Rest of New South Wales regions, the number of jobs held in 2016-17 was greater for males (52.1% and 51.5% of jobs, respectively) compared to females (47.9% and 48.5% of jobs, respectively). This was consistent at the national level, with males working across 52.0% of all jobs, compared to females, who worked across 48.0% of total jobs during 2016-17.

Jobs by age

In 2016-17, across the Greater Sydney region, the highest number of jobs were held by people in the 25 to 29 year age group (609,500 jobs), with males in this age group holding a higher proportion of the jobs than females (51.5% and 48.5% respectively). These results were also consistent in the Rest of New South Wales, with males in this age group holding 53.1% of all jobs compared to 46.9% held by females. Over the past six years, this age group filled the most number of jobs in the Greater Sydney Region. Conversely in the Rest of New South Wales, there has been a gradual shift from the 50 to 54 year age group having the highest number of jobs in 2011-12.

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This was also consistent at the national level, with 2.6 million jobs held by people in this age group and males holding a slightly higher proportion of the jobs than females (52.2% and 47.8% respectively) during 2016-17. Similarly, this age group also held the highest number of jobs over the past six years across Australia.

Type of employment

Of the 4,089,300 jobs in the Greater Sydney region in 2016-17, 90.4% of them were employee jobs (footnote 3) and 9.6% were jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. In the Rest of New South Wales, the majority of jobs worked were also employee jobs (87.3%) compared to jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises (12.7%) over the same period. This development was also consistent at the national level, with 89.5% of all jobs being employee jobs, and only 10.5% being worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. These proportions have been relatively stable over the six years at both the New South Wales and national level.

Median income

The median income per job (footnote 4) in Greater Sydney region was higher than in the Rest of the New South Wales ($46,500 and $39,000 respectively) in 2016-17. This has been constant over the previous six years. Since 2011-12, the median income per job grew by 11.5% in Greater Sydney and 12.3% in the Rest of New South Wales.

By gender, the male median income per job was higher than the female median in both regions consecutively throughout all six years of data. Since 2011-12, the male median income per job grew by 10.2% in Greater Sydney and by 8.1% in the Rest of New South Wales. Over the same period, the female median income per job increased by 12.5% in the Greater Sydney region and by 18.0% in the Rest of New South Wales.

Nationally, the median income per job was $43,200 in 2016-17, slightly lower than the New South Wales median of $43,800. Similarly, the median income per job for males was also higher than for females ($52,700 and $34,900 respectively) during 2016-17, as well as over the previous six years.

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Industry

In the Greater Sydney region, the five key industries that supplied the most jobs during 2016-17 were Administrative and support services, Professional scientific and technical services, Health care and social assistance, Retail trade and Accommodation and food services. Over the past 12 months, the number of jobs in all of these industries increased.

Over the same period, the five highest employing industries were found to be different in the Rest of New South Wales, with the highest number of jobs in Health care and social assistance, Retail trade, Accommodation and food services, Education and training and Public administration and safety. Similar to Greater Sydney region, the number of jobs in each of these industries increased over the period.

In comparison, the highest employing industries in Australia during 2016-17 were Health care and social assistance, Retail trade, Administration and support services, Education and training, and Accommodation and food services. Over the past 12 months, there was jobs growth in all of these industries.

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Occupation

In 2016-17, the most common occupations nationally were Professionals (18.2% of all occupations), Clerical and administrative workers (11.5%), and Managers (10.7%). In New South Wales, the most common were Professionals (19.2%), Clerical and administrative workers (11.6%), and Managers(11.5%).

In the Greater Sydney region, the most common occupations were Professionals (21.2% of all occupations), Managers (12.9%), and Clerical and administrative workers (12.3%). In comparison, the most common occupations in the Rest of New South Wales were Professionals (15.1%), Technicians and trades workers (11.0%), Clerical and administrative workers (10.3%) and Community and personal service workers (10.3%).

Differences in male and female employment in occupations continued to be pronounced in New South Wales. Jobs worked by Managers, Technicians and trades workers, Machinery operators and drivers, and Labourers were most likely to be held by males, while those worked by Professionals, Community and personal service workers, Clerical and administrative support workers, and Sales workers were most likely to be held by females.

Footnotes

The ABS would like to acknowledge the collaboration and support of the Northern Territory Department of Treasury and Finance in analysing the state and territory level statistics and developing the eight state and territory spotlights in this release.

  1. "Jobs in Greater Sydney" and "Jobs in the Rest of New South Wales" refer to jobs worked by people living in those regions.
  2. The job counts in this publication differ from the filled job estimates from other data sources such as the Australian Labour Account and the Labour Force Australia. The Jobs in Australia data sourced from LEED provides insights into all jobs held throughout the year, while the Labour Account data provides the number of filled jobs at a point-in-time each quarter, and Labour Force Survey data measures the number of people employed each month.
  3. Employee jobs include owner managers of incorporated enterprises as these employees cannot be separately identified from other employees in this publication.
  4. Median employment income per job is based on filled employee jobs during the reference year. It has been adjusted to account for the duration the job was held. For further detail, see the Explanatory Notes.

Jobs in Victoria

This feature article is based on the Victoria Greater Capital City Statistical Areas (the Greater Melbourne region, and the Rest of Victoria) (footnote 1).

Number of employed persons and jobs

In 2016-17, around 2.6 million people in the Greater Melbourne region were employed at some point during the year, who worked across 3.7 million jobs (footnote 2). The number of employed people increased by 3.3% over the past 12 months, and increased by 9.7% over the previous six years. The number of jobs reflected similar results (up 5.1% and 12.4%, respectively) in the Greater Melbourne region.

Of the people employed, 2.2 million people (84.4%) were single job holders, while 413,400 people (15.6%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. This trend has been consistent over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 85.2% and multiple job holders averaging 14.8% in the Greater Melbourne region.

In comparison, there were 786,200 employed people in the Rest of Victoria during 2016-17, which represents an increase of 2.3% from the previous year, and 3.8% from 2011-12. These people worked across 1.1 million jobs during the year, which reflects a 4.1% increase from 2015-16 and a 5.2% increase from 2011-12 in the number of jobs.

The number of jobs was higher in the Greater Melbourne region compared to the Rest of Victoria (76.9% and 23.1% respectively), reflecting the demographic dynamics of the jurisdiction, that is, more people live and work in the capital city region. This proportion has been relative stable over the past six years.

In the Rest of Victoria, 656,300 people (83.5%) were single job holders, while 129,900 people (16.5%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. As in the Greater Melbourne region, the majority of people worked one job at a time during a year over the past six years. Over this period, single job holders averaged 85.2% whilst multiple job holders averaged 14.8%.

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Across Australia, there were 13.5 million employed people in 2016-17 who worked across 19.2 million jobs during the year. The number of employed people has continued to grow at the national level over the time series (up 2.1% from 2015-16 and up 5.4% from 2011-12). This is also true for the number of jobs worked in Australia (up 3.6% from 2015-16 and up 6.4% from 2011-12).

Of the people employed across Australia, 84.4% of people were single job holders compared to 15.6% who held multiple jobs at the same time throughout 2016-17. This proportion has remained stable over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 85.0% and multiple job holders averaging 15.0%.

Jobs by gender

In the Greater Melbourne region, the number of jobs held by males increased by 5.3%, and the number of jobs held by females increased by 4.8% over the past 12 months. Similarly in the Rest of Victoria, the number of jobs held by both males and females grew (up 4.0% and 4.2% respectively) over the same period.

Compared to 2011-12, the number of jobs held by both males and females increased (up 11.6% and 13.2% respectively) in the Greater Melbourne region and in the Rest of Victoria (up 3.2% and 7.3% respectively). Nationally, the increase in the number of jobs was a result of growth in jobs by both males and females over the previous 12 months and six years. The growth rate in the number of jobs held by females was greater than males over the time series (7.9% and 5.1% respectively).

In both the Greater Melbourne and Rest of Victoria regions, the number of jobs held in 2016-17 was greater for males (51.6% and 48.4% of jobs, respectively) compared to females (50.8% and 49.2% of jobs, respectively). This was consistent at the national level, with males working across 52.0% of all jobs, compared to females, who worked across 48.0% of total jobs during 2016-17.

Jobs by age

In 2016-17, across the Greater Melbourne region, the highest number of jobs were held by people in the 25 to 29 year age group (557,400 jobs), with males in this age group holding a higher proportion of the jobs than females (51.3% and 48.7% respectively). These results were also consistent in the Rest of Victoria region, with males in this age group holding 52.1% of all jobs compared to 47.9% held by females. Over the past six years, this age group filled the most number of jobs in both the Victoria regions.

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This was also consistent at the national level, with 2.6 million jobs held by people in this age group and males holding a slightly higher proportion of the jobs than females (52.2% and 47.8% respectively) during 2016-17. Similarly, this age group also held the highest number of jobs over the past six years across Australia.

Type of employment

Of the 3.7 million jobs in the Greater Melbourne region in 2016-17, 90.0% of them were employee jobs (footnote 3) and 10.0% were jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. In the Rest of Victoria, the majority of jobs worked were also employee jobs (86.5%) compared to jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises (13.5%) over the same period. This development was also consistent at the national level, with 89.5% of all jobs being employee jobs, and only 10.5% being worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. These proportions have been relative stable over the six years at both the Victoria and national level.

Median income

The median income per job (footnote 4) in Greater Melbourne region was higher than in the Rest of Victoria ($43,800 and $36,700 respectively) in 2016-17. The median income per job grew by 11.7% in Greater Melbourne and 13.9% in the Rest of Victoria since 2011-12.

By gender, the male median income per job was higher than the female median in both regions consecutively throughout all six years of data. Since 2011-12, the male median income per job grew by 9.7% in Greater Melbourne and by 11.0% in the Rest of Victoria. Over the same period, the female median income per job increased by 14.2% in the Greater Melbourne region and by 18.8% in the Rest of Victoria.

Nationally, the median income per job was $43,200 in 2016-17, slightly higher than the Victoria median of $42,100. Similarly, the national median income per job for males was also higher than for females ($52,700 and $34,900 respectively) during 2016-17, as well as over the previous six years.

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Industry

In the Greater Melbourne region, the five key industries that supplied the most jobs during 2016-17 were Health care and social assistance, Administrative and support services, Retail trade, Professional, scientific and technical services and Education and training. Over the past 12 months, the number of jobs in all of these industries increased.

Over the same period, three out of the five highest employing industries were found to be similar in the Rest of Victoria, with the highest number of jobs in Health care and social assistance, Retail trade, Education and training, Accommodation and food services, and Manufacturing. The number of jobs in each of these industries increased over the period, with the exception of Education and training (down 2.4%).

In comparison, the highest employing industries in Australia during 2016-17 were Health care and social assistance, Retail trade, Administration and support services, Education and training, and Accommodation and food services. Over the past 12 months, there was jobs growth in all of these industries.

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Occupation

In 2016-17, the most common occupations nationally were Professionals (18.2% of all occupations), Clerical and administrative workers (11.5%), and Managers (10.7%). In the Victoria, the most common were Professionals (19.4%), Clerical and administrative workers (11.5%), and Managers (11.1%).

In the Greater Melbourne region, the most common occupations were Professionals (20.6% of all occupations), Clerical and administrative workers (12.1%), and Managers (11.8%). In comparison, the most common occupations in the Rest of Victoria were Professionals (15.4%), Technicians and Trades Workers (10.8%) and Labourers (11.0%).

Differences in male and female employment in occupations continued to be pronounced in the Victoria. Jobs worked by Managers, Technicians and trades workers, Machinery operators and drivers, and Labourers were most likely to be held by males, while those worked by Professionals, Community and personal service workers, Clerical and administrative workers, and Sales workers were most likely to be held by females.

Footnotes

The ABS would like to acknowledge the collaboration and support of the Northern Territory Department of Treasury and Finance in analysing the state and territory level statistics and developing the eight state and territory spotlights in this release.

  1. "Jobs in Melbourne" and "Jobs in the Rest of Victoria" refer to jobs worked by people living in those regions.
  2. The job counts in this publication differ from the filled job estimates from other data sources such as the Australian Labour Account and the Labour Force Australia. The Jobs in Australia data sourced from LEED provides insights into all jobs held throughout the year, while the Labour Account data provides the number of filled jobs at a point-in-time each quarter, and Labour Force Survey data measures the number of people employed each month.
  3. Employee jobs include owner managers of incorporated enterprises as these employees cannot be separately identified from other employees in this publication.
  4. Median employment income per job is based on filled employee jobs during the reference year. It has been adjusted to account for the duration the job was held. For further detail, see the Explanatory Notes.

Jobs in Queensland

This feature article presents information for the Queensland Greater Capital City Statistical Areas (the Greater Brisbane region, and the Rest of Queensland) (footnote 1).

Number of employed persons and jobs

In 2016-17, around 1,341,500 people in the Greater Brisbane region were employed at some point during the year, who worked across 1,896,000 jobs (footnote 2). The number of employed people increased by 2.8% over the past 12 months, and increased by 6.1% over the previous six years. The number of jobs reflected similar results (up 3.8% and 6.9%, respectively) in the Greater Brisbane region.

Of the people employed, 1,138,300 people (84.8%) were single job holders, while 203,300 people (15.2%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. This trend has been consistent over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 85.3% and multiple job holders averaging 14.7% in the Greater Brisbane region.

In comparison, there were 1,368,200 employed people in the Rest of Queensland during 2016-17, which represents an increase of 2.4% from the previous year, and 2.0% from 2011-12. These people worked across 1,973,800 jobs during the year, which reflects a 3.8% increase from 2015-16 and a 1.0% increase from 2011-12 in the number of jobs. The number of jobs was higher in the Rest of Queensland compared to the Greater Brisbane region (51.0% and 49.0% respectively). This proportion has been relatively stable over the past six years.

In the Rest of Queensland, 1,150,500 people (84.1%) were single job holders, while 217,700 people (15.9%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. As in the Greater Brisbane region, the majority of people worked one job at a time during a year over the past six years. Over this period, single job holders averaged 84.8% whilst multiple job holders averaged 15.2% in the Rest of Queensland.

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Across Australia, there were 13.5 million employed people in 2016-17 who worked across 19.2 million jobs during the year. The number of employed people has continued to grow at the national level over the time series (up 2.1% from 2015-16 and up 5.4% from 2011-12). This is also true for the number of jobs worked in Australia (up 3.6% from 2015-16 and up 6.4% from 2011-12).

Of the people employed across Australia, 84.4% of people were single job holders compared to 15.6% who held multiple jobs at the same time throughout 2016-17. This proportion has remained stable over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 85.0% and multiple job holders averaging 15.0%.

Jobs by gender

In the Greater Brisbane region, the number of jobs held by males increased by 3.7%, and the number of jobs held by females increased by 3.8% over the past 12 months. Similarly in the Rest of the Queensland, the number of jobs held by both males and females also grew (up by 3.6% and 4.1% respectively) over the same period.

Compared to 2011-12, the number of jobs held by both males and females increased (up 6.1% and 7.9% respectively) in the Greater Brisbane region. In the Rest of Queensland, the number of jobs held by females increased (up by 3.0%), however decreased for males (down by 0.7%). Nationally, the increase in the number of jobs was a result of growth in jobs by both males and females over the previous 12 months and six years. The growth rate in the number of jobs held by females was greater than males over the time series (7.9% and 5.1% respectively).

In both the Greater Brisbane and Rest of Queensland regions, the number of jobs held in 2016-17 was greater for males (52.2% and 52.3% of jobs, respectively) compared to females (47.8% and 47.7% of jobs, respectively). This was consistent at the national level, with males working across 52.0% of all jobs, compared to females, who worked across 48.0% of total jobs during 2016-17.

Jobs by age

In 2016-17, across the Greater Brisbane region, the highest number of jobs were held by people in the 25 to 29 year age group (261,700 jobs), with males in this age group holding a higher proportion of the jobs than females (52.8% and 47.2% respectively). These results were also consistent in the Rest of Queensland, with males in this age group holding 53.3% of all jobs compared to 46.7% held by females. Over the past six years, this age group filled the most number of jobs in both the Queensland regions.

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This was also consistent at the national level, with 2.6 million jobs held by people in this age group and males holding a slightly higher proportion of the jobs than females (52.2% and 47.8% respectively) during 2016-17. Similarly, this age group also held the highest number of jobs over the past six years across Australia.

Type of employment

Of the 1,896,000 jobs in the Greater Brisbane region in 2016-17, 91.3% of them were employee jobs (footnote 3) and 8.7% were jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. In the Rest of Queensland, the majority of jobs worked were also employee jobs (88.6%) compared to jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises (11.4%) over the same period. This development was also consistent at the national level, with 89.5% of all jobs being employee jobs, and only 10.5% being worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. These proportions have been relatively stable over the six years at both the Queensland and national level.

Median income

The median income per job (footnote 4) in Greater Brisbane region was higher than in the Rest of the Queensland ($45,200 and $40,400 respectively) in 2016-17. This has been constant over the previous six years. Since 2011-12, the median income per job grew by 9.7% in Greater Brisbane and 9.1% in the Rest of Queensland.

By gender, the male median income per job was higher than the female median in both regions consecutively throughout all six years of data. Since 2011-12, the male median income per job grew by 6.5% in Greater Brisbane and by 4.9% in the Rest of Queensland. Over the same period, the female median income per job increased by 13.3% in the Greater Brisbane region and by 14.7% in the Rest of Queensland.

Nationally, the median income per job was $43,200 in 2016-17, slightly higher than the Queensland median of $42,700. Similarly, the median income per job for males was also higher than for females ($52,700 and $34,900 respectively) during 2016-17, as well as over the previous six years.

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Industry

In the Greater Brisbane region, the five key industries that supplied the most jobs during 2016-17 were Health care and social assistance, Administrative and support services, Retail trade, Education and training, and Professional scientific and technical services. Over the past 12 months, the number of jobs in all of these industries increased.

Over the same period, three out of the five highest employing industries were found to be similar in the Rest of Queensland, with the highest number of jobs in Health care and social assistance, Retail trade, Accommodation and food services, Construction and Administrative and support services. Similar to Greater Brisbane region, the number of jobs in each of these industries increased over the period.

In comparison, the highest employing industries in Australia during 2016-17 were Health care and social assistance, Retail trade, Administration and support services, Education and training, and Accommodation and food services. Over the past 12 months, there was jobs growth in all of these industries.

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Occupation

In 2016-17, the most common occupations nationally were Professionals (18.2% of all occupations), Clerical and administrative workers (11.5%), and Managers (10.7%). In Queensland, the most common were Professionals (16.2%), Clerical and administrative workers (11.4%), and Technicians and trades workers (10.9%).

In the Greater Brisbane region, the most common occupations were Professionals (18.8% of all occupations) Clerical and administrative workers (12.6%), and Managers (10.5%). In comparison, the most common occupations in the Rest of Queensland were Professionals (13.5%), Technicians and trades workers (11.7%), Labourers (10.3%) and Community and personal service workers (10.3%).

Differences in male and female employment in occupations continued to be pronounced in Queensland. Jobs worked by Managers, Technicians and trades workers, Machinery operators and drivers, and Labourers were most likely to be held by males, while those worked by Professionals, Community and personal service workers, Clerical and administrative workers, and Sales workers were most likely to be held by females.

Footnotes

The ABS would like to acknowledge the collaboration and support of the Northern Territory Department of Treasury and Finance in analysing the state and territory level statistics and developing the eight state and territory spotlights in this release.

  1. "Jobs in Greater Brisbane" and "Jobs in the Rest of Queensland" refer to jobs worked by people living in those regions.
  2. The job counts in this publication differ from the filled job estimates from other data sources such as the Australian Labour Account and the Labour Force Australia. The Jobs in Australia data sourced from LEED provides insights into all jobs held throughout the year, while the Labour Account data provides the number of filled jobs at a point-in-time each quarter, and Labour Force Survey data measures the number of people employed each month.
  3. Employee jobs include owner managers of incorporated enterprises as these employees cannot be separately identified from other employees in this publication.
  4. Median employment income per job is based on filled employee jobs during the reference year. It has been adjusted to account for the duration the job was held. For further detail, see the Explanatory Notes.

Jobs in South Australia

This feature article is based on South Australia Greater Capital City Statistical Areas (the Greater Adelaide region, and the Rest of the South Australia) (footnote 1).

Number of employed persons and jobs

In 2016-17, around 703,000 people in the Greater Adelaide region were employed at some point during the year, who worked across 965,700 jobs (footnote 2). The number of employed people increased by 1.0% over the past 12 months, and by 1.0% over the previous six years. The number of jobs reflected similar results (up 2.8% and 1.3%, respectively) in the Greater Adelaide region.

Of the people employed, 599,900 people (85.3%) were single job holders, while 103,200 people (14.7%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. This trend has been consistent over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 85.6% and multiple job holders averaging 14.4% in the Greater Adelaide region.

In comparison, there were 196,400 employed people in the Rest of the South Australia during 2016-17, which represents an increase of 2.1% from the previous year, but a decrease of 1.6% from 2011-12. These people worked across 279,000 jobs during the year, which reflects a 3.2% increase from 2015-16, but a 1.7% decline from 2011-12 in the number of jobs. The number of jobs was higher in Greater Adelaide region compared to the Rest of the South Australia (77.6% and 22.4% respectively), reflecting the demographic dynamics of the jurisdiction, that is, more people live and work in the capital city region. This proportion has been relative stable over the past six years.

In the Rest of the South Australia, 166,000 people (84.5%) were single job holders, while 30,500 people (15.5%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. As in the Greater Adelaide region, the majority of people worked one job at a time during a year over the past six years. Over this period, single job holders averaged 85.0% whilst multiple job holders averaged 15.0%.

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Across Australia, there were 13.5 million employed people in 2016-17 who worked across 19.2 million jobs during the year. The number of employed people has continued to grow at the national level over the time series (up 2.1% from 2015-16 and up 5.4% from 2011-12). This is also true for the number of jobs worked in Australia (up 3.6% from 2015-16 and up 6.4% from 2011-12).

Of the people employed across Australia, 84.4% of people were single job holders compared to 15.6% who held multiple jobs at the same time throughout 2016-17. This proportion has remained stable over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 85.0% and multiple job holders averaging 15.0%.

Jobs by gender

In the Greater Adelaide region, the number of jobs held by males increased by 2.9%, and the number of jobs held by females increased by 2.7% over the past 12 months. Similarly in the Rest of the South Australia, the number of jobs held by both males and females also grew (up by 3.2% and 3.3% respectively) over the same period.

Compared to 2011-12, the number of jobs held by both males and females increased (up 0.3% and 2.4% respectively) in the Greater Adelaide region, but decreased in the Rest of the South Australia (down by 2.9% and 0.4% respectively). Nationally, the increase in the number of jobs was a result of growth in jobs by both males and females over the previous 12 months and six years. The growth rate in the number of jobs held by females was greater than males over the time series (7.9% and 5.1% respectively).

In both the Greater Adelaide and Rest of the South Australia regions, the number of jobs held in 2016-17 was greater for males (51.0% and 53.0% of jobs, respectively) compared to females (49.0% and 47.0% of jobs, respectively). This was consistent at the national level, with males working across 52.0% of all jobs, compared to females, who worked across 48.0% of total jobs during 2016-17.

Jobs by age

In 2016-17, across the Greater Adelaide region, the highest number of jobs were held by people in the 25 to 29 year age group (119,600 jobs), with males in this age group holding a higher proportion of the jobs than females (51.7% and 48.3% respectively). In contrast, the highest number of jobs were held by people in the 45-49 years age group in the Rest of the South Australia, with males in this age group holding 50.4% of all jobs compared to 49.6% held by females. Over the past six years, the majority of jobs in the Greater Adelaide region were held by people in this age group. Conversely in the Rest of South Australia, there has been a gradual shift from the 50 to 54 year age group having the highest number of jobs in 2011-12.

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This was also consistent at the national level, with 2.6 million jobs held by people in this age group and males holding a slightly higher proportion of the jobs than females (52.2% and 47.8% respectively) during 2016-17. Similarly, this age group also held the highest number of jobs over the past six years across Australia.

Type of employment

Of the 965,700 jobs in the Greater Adelaide region in 2016-17, 89.8% of them were employee jobs (footnote 3) and 10.2% were jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. In the Rest of the South Australia, the majority of jobs worked were also employee jobs (83.7%) compared to jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises (16.3%) over the same period. This development was also consistent at the national level, with 89.5% of all jobs being employee jobs, and only 10.5% being worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. These proportions have been relative stable over the six years at both the South Australia and national level.

Median income

The median income per job (footnote 4) in Greater Adelaide region was higher than in the Rest of the South Australia ($43,000 and $35,500 respectively) in 2016-17. This has been constant over the previous six years. Since 2011-12, the median income per job grew by 12.3% in Greater Adelaide and 11.9% in the Rest of the South Australia.

By gender, the male median income per job was higher than the female median in both regions consecutively throughout all six years of data. Since 2011-12, the male median income per job grew by 9.3% in Greater Adelaide and by 7.6% in the Rest of the South Australia. Over the same period, the female median income per job increased by 16.7% in the Greater Adelaide region and by 18.1% in the Rest of the South Australia, a greater growth rate than that of males.

Nationally, the median income per job was $43,200 in 2016-17, slightly higher than South Australia median of $41,400. Similarly, the median income per job for males was also higher than for females ($52,700 and $34,900 respectively) during 2016-17, as well as over the previous six years.

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Industry

In the Greater Adelaide region, the five key industries that supplied the most jobs during 2016-17 were Health care and social assistance, Retail trade, Education and training, Administrative and support services, and Accommodation and food services. Over the past 12 months, the number of jobs in all of these industries increased.

Over the same period, three out of the five highest employing industries were found to be similar in the Rest of the South Australia, with the highest number of jobs in were Agriculture, forestry and fishing, Health care and social assistance, Retail trade, Manufacturing and Administrative and support services. Similar to Greater Adelaide region, the number of jobs in each of these industries increased.

In comparison, the highest employing industries in Australia during 2016-17 were Health care and social assistance, Retail trade, Administration and support services, Education and training, and Accommodation and food services. Over the past 12 months, there was jobs growth in all of these industries.

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Occupation

In 2016-17, the most common occupations nationally were Professionals (18.2% of all occupations), Clerical and administrative workers (11.5%), and Managers (10.7%). In South Australia, the most common were Professionals (17.0%), Clerical and administrative workers (11.4%), and Community and personal service workers (10.6%).

In the Greater Adelaide region, the most common occupations were Professionals (18.8% of all occupations) Clerical and administrative workers (12.2%), and Community and personal service workers (10.8%). In comparison, the most common occupations in the Rest of the South Australia were Labourers (15.0%), Professionals (10.7%), and Technicians and trades workers (10.3%).

Differences in male and female employment in occupations continued to be pronounced in South Australia. Jobs worked by Managers, Technicians and trades workers, Machinery operators and drivers, and Labourers were most likely to be held by males, while those worked by Professionals, Community and personal service workers, Clerical and administrative workers, and Sales workers were most likely to be held by females.

Footnotes

The ABS would like to acknowledge the collaboration and support of the Northern Territory Department of Treasury and Finance in analysing the state and territory level statistics and developing the eight state and territory spotlights in this release.

  1. "Jobs in Adelaide" and "Jobs in the Rest of the South Australia" refer to jobs worked by people living in those regions.
  2. The job counts in this publication differ from the filled job estimates from other data sources such as the Australian Labour Account and the Labour Force Australia. The Jobs in Australia data sourced from LEED provides insights into all jobs held throughout the year, while the Labour Account data provides the number of filled jobs at a point-in-time each quarter, and Labour Force Survey data measures the number of people employed each month.
  3. Employee jobs include owner managers of incorporated enterprises as these employees cannot be separately identified from other employees in this publication.
  4. Median employment income per job is based on filled employee jobs during the reference year. It has been adjusted to account for the duration the job was held. For further detail, see the Explanatory Notes.

Jobs in Western Australia

This feature article is based on the Western Australia Greater Capital City Statistical Areas (the Greater Perth region, and the Rest of Western Australia) (footnote 1).

Number of employed persons and jobs

In 2016-17, around 1.2 million people in the Greater Perth region were employed at some point during the year, who worked across 1.7 million jobs (footnote 2). The number of employed people decreased by 0.9% over the past 12 months, but increased by 1.5% over the previous six years. The number of jobs reflected a slightly different results (up 0.5% and down 0.7%, respectively) in the Greater Perth region.

Of the people employed, 978,100 people (84.4%) were single job holders, while 180,600 people (15.6%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. This trend has been consistent over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 84.6% and multiple job holders averaging 15.4% in the Greater Perth region.

In comparison, there were 296,200 employed people in the Rest of Western Australia during 2016-17, which represents an increase of 0.1% from the previous year, but a decrease 1.3% from 2011-12. These people worked across 436,200 jobs during the year, which reflects a 1.8% increase from 2015-16 and a 3.3% decrease from 2011-12 in the number of jobs.

The number of jobs was higher in the Greater Perth region compared to the Rest of Western Australia (79.1% and 20.9% respectively), reflecting the demographic dynamics of the jurisdiction, that is, more people live and work in the capital city region. This proportion has been relatively stable over the past six years.

In the Rest of Western Australia, 248,000 people (83.7%) were single job holders, while 48,200 people (16.3%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. As in the Greater Perth region, the majority of people worked one job at a time during a year over the past six years. Over this period, single job holders averaged 84.4% whilst multiple job holders averaged 15.6%.

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Across Australia, there were 13.5 million employed people in 2016-17 who worked across 19.2 million jobs during the year. The number of employed people has continued to grow at the national level over the time series (up 2.1% from 2015-16 and up 5.4% from 2011-12). This is also true for the number of jobs worked in Australia (up 3.6% from 2015-16 and up 6.4% from 2011-12).

Of the people employed across Australia, 84.4% of people were single job holders compared to 15.6% who held multiple jobs at the same time throughout 2016-17. This proportion has remained stable over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 85.0% and multiple job holders averaging 15.0%.

Jobs by gender

In the Greater Perth region, the number of jobs held by females increased by 1.1% and the number of jobs held by males remained stable over the past 12 months. In contrast, in the Rest of Western Australia, the number of jobs held by both males and females grew (up by 1.4% and 2.4% respectively) over the same period.

Compared to 2011-12, the number of jobs held by females increased (up by 1.4%), but decreased for males (down by 2.5%) in the Greater Perth region. In the Rest of Western Australia, the number of jobs held by both males and females decreased (down 5.2% and 0.9% respectively). Nationally, the increase in the number of jobs was a result of growth in jobs by both males and females over the previous 12 months and six years. The growth rate in the number of jobs held by females was greater than males over the time series (7.9% and 5.1% respectively).

In both the Greater Perth and Rest of Western Australia regions, the number of jobs held in 2016-17 was greater for males (53.5% and 53.4% of jobs, respectively) compared to females (46.5% and 46.6% of jobs, respectively). This was consistent at the national level, with males working across 52.0% of all jobs, compared to females, who worked across 48.0% of total jobs during 2016-17.

Jobs by age

In 2016-17, across the Greater Perth region, the highest number of jobs were held by people in the 25 to 29 year age group (232,200 jobs), with males in this age group holding a higher proportion of the jobs than females (53.5% and 46.5% respectively). These results were also consistent in the Rest of Western Australia region, with males in this age group holding 54.4% of all jobs compared to 45.6% held by females. Over the past six years, this age group filled the most number of jobs in both the Western Australia regions.

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This was also consistent at the national level, with 2.6 million jobs held by people in this age group and males holding a slightly higher proportion of the jobs than females (52.2% and 47.8% respectively) during 2016-17. Similarly, this age group also held the highest number of jobs over the past six years across Australia.

Type of employment

Of the 1.7 million jobs in the Greater Perth region in 2016-17, 90.5% of them were employee jobs (footnote 3) and 9.5% were jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. In the Rest of Western Australia, the majority of jobs worked were also employee jobs (87.1%) compared to jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises (12.9%) over the same period. This development was also consistent at the national level, with 89.5% of all jobs being employee jobs, and only 10.5% being worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. These proportions have been relatively stable over the six years at both the Western Australia and national level.

Median income

The median income per job (footnote 4) in Greater Perth region was higher than in the Rest of Western Australia ($46,900 and $42,300 respectively) in 2016-17. This has been constant over the previous six years. Since 2011-12, the median income per job grew by 6.3% in Greater Perth and 4% in the Rest of Western Australia.

By gender, the male median income per job was higher than the female median in both regions consecutively throughout all six years of data. Since 2011-12, the male median income per job grew by 2.1% in Greater Perth and decreased by 1.1% in the Rest of Western Australia. Over the same period, the female median income per job increased by 12.0% in the Greater Perth region and by 10.3% in the Rest of Western Australia.

Nationally, the median income per job was $43,200 in 2016-17, lower than the Western Australia median of $46,000. Similarly, the national median income per job for males was also higher than for females ($52,700 and $34,900 respectively) during 2016-17, as well as over the previous six years.

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Industry

In the Greater Perth region, the five key industries that supplied the most jobs during 2016-17 were Health care and social assistance, Administrative and support services, Retail trade, Construction, and Education and training. Over the past 12 months, the number of jobs in most of these industries increased, with the exception of Construction (down 3.5%).

Over the same period, three out of the five highest employing industries were found to be similar in the Rest of Western Australia, with the highest number of jobs in Health care and social assistance, Retail trade, Agriculture, Construction, and Accommodation and food services. In contrast to the Greater Perth region, employment decreased in two of the top five industries with Construction (down 2.5%) and Accommodation and food services (down 2.3%).

In comparison, the highest employing industries in Australia during 2016-17 were Health care and social assistance, Retail trade, Administration and support services, Education and training, and Accommodation and food services. Over the past 12 months, there was jobs growth in all of these industries.

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Occupation

In 2016-17, the most common occupations nationally were Professionals (18.2% of all occupations), Clerical and administrative workers (11.5%), and Managers (10.7%). In the Western Australia, the most common were Professionals (17.4%), Technicians and trades workers (12.3%) and Clerical and administrative workers (10.9%).

In the Greater Perth region, the most common occupations were Professionals (18.9% of all occupations), Technicians and trades workers (12.1%), and Clerical and administrative workers (11.4%). In comparison, the most common occupations in the Rest of Western Australia were Technicians and trades workers (13.4%), Labourers (12.1%), and Professionals (11.6%).

Differences in male and female employment in occupations continued to be pronounced in the Western Australia. Jobs worked by Managers, Technicians and trades workers, Machinery operators and drivers, and Labourers were most likely to be held by males, while those worked by Professionals, Community and personal service workers, Clerical and administrative workers, and Sales workers were most likely to be held by females.

Footnotes

The ABS would like to acknowledge the collaboration and support of the Northern Territory Department of Treasury and Finance in analysing the state and territory level statistics and developing the eight state and territory spotlights in this release.

  1. "Jobs in Perth" and "Jobs in the Rest of Western Australia" refer to jobs worked by people living in those regions.
  2. The job counts in this publication differ from the filled job estimates from other data sources such as the Australian Labour Account and the Labour Force Australia. The Jobs in Australia data sourced from LEED provides insights into all jobs held throughout the year, while the Labour Account data provides the number of filled jobs at a point-in-time each quarter, and Labour Force Survey data measures the number of people employed each month.
  3. Employee jobs include owner managers of incorporated enterprises as these employees cannot be separately identified from other employees in this publication.
  4. Median employment income per job is based on filled employee jobs during the reference year. It has been adjusted to account for the duration the job was held. For further detail, see the Explanatory Notes.

Jobs in Tasmania

This feature article presents information for the Tasmanian Greater Capital City Statistical Areas (the Greater Hobart region, and the Rest of Tasmania) (footnote 1).

Number of employed persons and jobs

In 2016-17, around 124,000 people in the Greater Hobart region were employed at some point during the year, who worked across 173,800 jobs (footnote 2). The number of employed people increased by 2.8% over the past 12 months, and increased by 4.1% over the previous six years. The number of jobs reflected similar results (up 4.1% and 6.1%, respectively) in the Greater Hobart region.

Of the people employed, 103,100 people (83.2%) were single job holders, while 20,800 people (16.8%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. This trend has been consistent over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 84.0% and multiple job holders averaging 16.0% in the Greater Hobart region.

In comparison, there were 151,200 employed people in the Rest of Tasmania during 2016-17, which represents an increase of 1.5% from the previous year, and 0.3% from 2011-12. These people worked across 213,200 jobs during the year, which reflects a 2.9% increase from 2015-16 and a 0.9% increase from 2011-12 in the number of jobs. The number of jobs was higher in the Rest of Tasmania compared to the Greater Hobart region (55.1% and 44.9% respectively). This proportion has been relatively stable over the past six years.

In the Rest of Tasmania, 125,500 people (83.1%) were single job holders, while 25,600 people (16.9%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. As in the Greater Hobart region, the majority of people worked one job at a time during a year over the past six years. Over this period, single job holders averaged 84.1% whilst multiple job holders averaged 15.9% in the Rest of Tasmania.

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Across Australia, there were 13.5 million employed people in 2016-17 who worked across 19.2 million jobs during the year. The number of employed people has continued to grow at the national level over the time series (up 2.1% from 2015-16 and up 5.4% from 2011-12). This is also true for the number of jobs worked in Australia (up 3.6% from 2015-16 and up 6.4% from 2011-12).

Of the people employed across Australia, 84.4% of people were single job holders compared to 15.6% who held multiple jobs at the same time throughout 2016-17. This proportion has remained stable over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 85.0% and multiple job holders averaging 15.0%.

Jobs by gender

In the Greater Hobart region, the number of jobs held by males increased by 4.0%, and the number of jobs held by females increased by 4.2% over the past 12 months. Similarly in the Rest of the Tasmania, the number of jobs held by both males and females also grew (up by 2.0% and 3.8% respectively) over the same period.

Compared to 2011-12, the number of jobs held by both males and females increased (up 4.9% and 7.2% respectively) in the Greater Hobart region. In the Rest of Tasmania, the number of jobs held by females increased (up by 3.6%), however decreased for males (down by 1.5%). Nationally, the increase in the number of jobs was a result of growth in jobs by both males and females over the previous 12 months and six years. The growth rate in the number of jobs held by females was greater than males over the time series (7.9% compared to 5.1% respectively).

In the Greater Hobart region, the number of jobs held in 2016-17 was greater for females (50.4%) compared to males (49.6%). However, this was reversed for the Rest of Tasmania, where the number of jobs held by males (51.5%) was greater than those held by females (48.5%). This was consistent at the national level, with males working across 52.0% of all jobs, compared to females, who worked across 48.0% of total jobs during 2016-17.

Jobs by age

In 2016-17, across the Greater Hobart region, the highest number of jobs were held by people in the 25-29 year age group (21,800 jobs), with males in this age group holding a slightly higher proportion of the jobs than females (50.5% and 49.5% respectively). For the Rest of Tasmania, the total highest number of jobs were also held by people in the 25-29 year age group, however with males holding a significantly higher share of jobs than females during 2016-17 (53.5% compared to 46.5% respectively).

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This was also consistent at the national level, with 2.6 million jobs held by people in this age group and males holding a slightly higher proportion of the jobs than females (52.2% and 47.8% respectively) during 2016-17. Similarly, this age group also held the highest number of jobs over the past six years across Australia.

Type of employment

Of the 173,800 jobs in the Greater Hobart region in 2016-17, 89.7% of them were employee jobs (footnote 3) and 10.3% were jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. In the Rest of Tasmania, the majority of jobs worked were also employee jobs (87.9%) compared to jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises (12.1%) over the same period. This development was also consistent at the national level, with 89.5% of all jobs being employee jobs, and only 10.5% being worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. These proportions have been relatively stable over the six years at both the Tasmanian state and national level.

Median income

The median income per job (footnote 4) in Greater Hobart region was higher than in the Rest of the Tasmania ($39,500 and $35,500 respectively) in 2016-17. This has been constant over the previous six years. Since 2011-12, the median income per job grew by 10.0% in Greater Hobart and 10.1% in the Rest of Tasmania.

Since 2011-12, the male median income per job grew by 8.4% in Greater Hobart and by 7.9% in the Rest of Tasmania. Over the same period, the female median income per job increased by 12.8% in the Greater Hobart region and by 15.6% in the Rest of Tasmania. Despite the higher growth rate, the male median income per job was higher than the female median in both regions consecutively throughout all six years of data.

Nationally, the median income per job was $43,200 in 2016-17, higher than the Tasmania median of $37,200. Similarly, the median income per job for males was also higher than for females ($52,700 and $34,900 respectively) during 2016-17, as well as over the previous six years.

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Industry

In the Greater Hobart region, the five key industries that supplied the most jobs during 2016-17 were Health care and social assistance, Education and training, Retail trade, Accommodation and food services and Public Administration and safety. Over the past 12 months, the number of jobs in all of these industries increased.

Over the same period, four out of five highest employing industries were found to be similar in the Rest of Tasmania, with the highest number of jobs in Health care and social assistance, Agriculture, forestry and fishing, Retail trade, Education and training and Accommodation and food services. The number of jobs increased in the majority of these industries over the period, however declined in Education and training and Accommodation and food services.

In comparison, the highest employing industries in Australia during 2016-17 were Health care and social assistance, Retail trade, Administration and support services, Education and training, and Accommodation and food services. Over the past 12 months, there was jobs growth in all of these industries.

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Occupation

In 2016-17, the most common occupations nationally were Professionals (18.2% of all occupations), Clerical and administrative workers (11.5%), and Managers (10.7%). In Tasmania, the most common were Professionals (15.8%), Labourers (11.3%), and Community and personal service workers (10.9%).

In the Greater Hobart region, the most common occupations were Professionals (18.9% of all occupations), Clerical and administrative workers (12.4%), and Community and personal service workers (11.5%). In comparison, the most common occupations in the Rest of Tasmania were Labourers (13.5%), Professionals (13.3%), and Technicians and trades workers (11.1%).

Differences in male and female employment in occupations continued to be pronounced in Tasmania. Jobs worked by Managers, Technicians and trades workers, Machinery operators and drivers, and Labourers were most likely to be held by males, while those worked by Professionals, Community and personal service workers, Clerical and administrative workers, and Sales workers were most likely to be held by females.

Footnotes

The ABS would like to acknowledge the collaboration and support of the Northern Territory Department of Treasury and Finance in analysing the state and territory level statistics and developing the eight state and territory spotlights in this release.

  1. "Jobs in Greater Hobart" and "Jobs in the Rest of Tasmania" refer to jobs worked by people living in those regions.
  2. The job counts in this publication differ from the filled job estimates from other data sources such as the Australian Labour Account and the Labour Force Australia. The Jobs in Australia data sourced from LEED provides insights into all jobs held throughout the year, while the Labour Account data provides the number of filled jobs at a point-in-time each quarter, and Labour Force Survey data measures the number of people employed each month.
  3. Employee jobs include owner managers of incorporated enterprises as these employees cannot be separately identified from other employees in this publication.
  4. Median employment income per job is based on filled employee jobs during the reference year. It has been adjusted to account for the duration the job was held. For further detail, see the Explanatory Notes.

Jobs in the Northern Territory

This feature article presents information for the Northern Territory Greater Capital City Statistical Areas (the Greater Darwin region, and the Rest of the Northern Territory) (footnote 1).

Number of employed persons and jobs

In 2016-17, around 96,100 people in the Greater Darwin region were employed at some point during the year, who worked across 145,400 jobs (footnote 2). The number of employed people decreased by 0.1% over the past 12 months, but increased by 5.7% over the previous six years. The number of jobs reflected similar results (down 0.3% and up 3.0%, respectively) in the Greater Darwin region.

Of the people employed, 78,200 people (81.4%) were single job holders, while 17,900 people (18.6%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. This trend has been consistent over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 81.4% and multiple job holders averaging 18.6% in the Greater Darwin region.

In comparison, there were 42,400 employed people in the Rest of the Northern Territory during 2016-17, which represents an increase of 11.2% from the previous year, and 6.2% from 2011-12. These people worked across 64,200 jobs during the year, which reflects a 12.1% increase from 2015-16 and a 5.9% increase from 2011-12 in the number of jobs.

The number of jobs was higher in the Greater Darwin region compared to the Rest of the Northern Territory (69.3% and 30.6% respectively), reflecting the demographic dynamics of the jurisdiction, that is, more people live and work in the capital city region. This proportion has been relatively stable over the past six years.

In the Rest of the Northern Territory, 33,900 people (79.9%) were single job holders, while 8,500 people (20.1%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. As in the Greater Darwin region, the majority of people worked one job at a time during a year over the past six years. Over this period, single job holders averaged 80.6% whilst multiple job holders averaged 19.4%.

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Across Australia, there were 13.5 million employed people in 2016-17 who worked across 19.2 million jobs during the year. The number of employed people has continued to grow at the national level over the time series (up 2.1% from 2015-16 and up 5.4% from 2011-12). This is also true for the number of jobs worked in Australia (up 3.6% from 2015-16 and up 6.4% from 2011-12).

Of the people employed across Australia, 84.4% of people were single job holders compared to 15.6% who held multiple jobs at the same time throughout 2016-17. This proportion has remained stable over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 85.0% and multiple job holders averaging 15.0%.

Jobs by gender

In the Greater Darwin region, the number of jobs held by males declined by 1.1%, and the number of jobs held by females increased by 0.7% over the past 12 months. In contrast, in the Rest of the Northern Territory, the number of jobs held by both males and females grew (each by 12.1% respectively) over the same period.

Compared to 2011-12, the number of jobs held by both males and females increased (up 3.7% and 2.2% respectively) in the Greater Darwin region and in the Rest of the Northern Territory (up 6% and 5.8% respectively). Nationally, the increase in the number of jobs was a result of growth in jobs by both males and females over the previous 12 months and six years. The growth rate in the number of jobs held by females was greater than males over the time series (7.9% and 5.1% respectively).

In both the Greater Darwin and Rest of the Northern Territory region, the number of jobs held in 2016-17 was greater for males (53.7% and 51.0% of jobs, respectively) compared to females (46.3% and 49.0% of jobs, respectively). This was consistent at the national level, with males working across 52.0% of all jobs, compared to females, who worked across 48.0% of total jobs during 2016-17.

Jobs by age

In 2016-17, across the Greater Darwin region, the highest number of jobs were held by people in the 25 to 29 year age group (23,500 jobs), with males in this age group holding a higher proportion of the jobs than females (52.7% and 47.3% respectively). In contrast, in the Rest of the Northern Territory region the 10,100 jobs held by persons in the 25 to 29 year age group are held slightly more by females than males (50.4% and 49.6% respectively). Over the past six years, this age group filled the most number of jobs in both the Northern Territory regions.

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This was also consistent at the national level, with 2.6 million jobs held by people in this age group and males holding a slightly higher proportion of the jobs than females (52.2% and 47.8% respectively) during 2016-17. Similarly, this age group also held the highest number of jobs over the past six years across Australia.

Type of employment

Of the 145,400 jobs in the Greater Darwin region in 2016-17, 93.7% of them were employee jobs (footnote 3) and 6.3% were jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. In the Rest of the Northern Territory, the majority of jobs worked were also employee jobs (95.2%) compared to jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises (4.8%) over the same period. This development was also consistent at the national level, with 89.5% of all jobs being employee jobs, and only 10.5% being worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. These proportions have been relatively stable over the six years at both the Northern Territory and national level.

Median income

The median income per job (footnote 4) in the Greater Darwin region was higher than in the Rest of the Northern Territory ($51,000 and $39,300 respectively) in 2016-17. This has been constant over the previous six years. Since 2011-12, the median income per job grew by 13.4% in Greater Darwin and 6.0% in the Rest of the Northern Territory.

By gender, the male median income per job was higher than the female median in both regions consecutively throughout all six years of data. Since 2011-12, the male median income per job grew by 12.3% in Greater Darwin and by 1.9% in the Rest of the Northern Territory. Over the same period, the female median income per job increased by 13.5% in the Greater Darwin region and by 12.5% in the Rest of the Northern Territory.

Nationally, the median income per job was $43,200 in 2016-17, lower than the Northern Territory median of $47,400. Similarly, the median income per job for males was also higher than for females ($52,700 and $34,900 respectively) during 2016-17, as well as over the previous six years.

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Industry

In the Greater Darwin region, the five key industries that supplied the most jobs during 2016-17 were Public administration and safety, Construction, Accommodation and food services, Administrative and support services, and Education and training. Over the past 12 months, the number of jobs in several of these industries declined, with the exception of Public administration and safety and Education and training (up 15.3% and 8.1% respectively).

Over the same period, three out of the five highest employing industries were found to be similar in the Rest of the Northern Territory, with the highest number of jobs in Public administration and safety, Health care and social assistance, Education and training, Accommodation and food services, and Retail trade. In contrast to the Greater Darwin region, the number of jobs in each of these industries increased over the period, with the exception of Health care and social assistance which declined.

In comparison, the highest employing industries in Australia during 2016-17 were Health care and social assistance, Retail trade, Administration and support services, Education and training, and Accommodation and food services. Over the past 12 months, there was jobs growth in all of these industries.

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Occupation

In 2016-17, the most common occupations nationally were Professionals (18.2% of all occupations), Clerical and administrative workers (11.5%), and Managers (10.7%). In the Northern Territory, the most common were Professionals (15.2%), Community and personal service workers (14.2%), and Technicians and trades workers (11.8%).

In the Greater Darwin region, the most common occupations were Professionals (15.3% of all occupations), Technicians and trades workers (12.9%), and Community and personal service workers (12.6%). In comparison, the most common occupations in the Rest of the Northern Territory were Community and personal service workers (17.8%), Professionals (15.2%), and Clerical and administrative workers (9.4%).

Differences in male and female employment in occupations continued to be pronounced in the Northern Territory. Jobs worked by Managers, Technicians and trades workers, Machinery operators and drivers, and Labourers were most likely to be held by males, while those worked by Professionals, Community and personal service workers, Clerical and administrative workers, and Sales workers were most likely to be held by females.

Footnotes

The ABS would like to acknowledge the collaboration and support of the Northern Territory Department of Treasury and Finance in analysing the state and territory level statistics and developing the eight state and territory spotlights in this release.

  1. "Jobs in Greater Darwin" and "Jobs in the Rest of the Northern Territory" refer to jobs worked by people living in those regions.
  2. The job counts in this publication differ from the filled job estimates from other data sources such as the Australian Labour Account and the Labour Force Australia. The Jobs in Australia data sourced from LEED provides insights into all jobs held throughout the year, while the Labour Account data provides the number of filled jobs at a point-in-time each quarter, and Labour Force Survey data measures the number of people employed each month.
  3. Employee jobs include owner managers of incorporated enterprises as these employees cannot be separately identified from other employees in this publication.
  4. Median employment income per job is based on filled employee jobs during the reference year. It has been adjusted to account for the duration the job was held. For further detail, see the Explanatory Notes.

Jobs in the Australian Capital Territory

This feature article is based on the Australian Capital Territory (footnote 1).

Number of employed persons and jobs

In 2016-17, around 249,200 people in the Australian Capital Territory were employed at some point during the year, who worked across 350,000 jobs (footnote 2). The number of employed people increased by 2.8% over the past 12 months, and increased by 4.9% over the previous six years.

Of the people employed, 209,700 people (84.2%) were single job holders, while 39,500 people (15.8%) worked multiple jobs at the same time during 2016-17. This trend has been consistent over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 84.3% and multiple job holders averaging 15.7% in the Australian Capital Territory.

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Across Australia, there were 13.5 million employed people in 2016-17 who worked across 19.2 million jobs during the year. The number of employed people has continued to grow at the national level over the time series (up 2.1% from 2015-16 and up 5.4% from 2011-12). This is also true for the number of jobs worked in Australia (up 3.6% from 2015-16 and up 6.4% from 2011-12).

Of the people employed across Australia, 84.4% of people were single job holders compared to 15.6% who held multiple jobs at the same time throughout 2016-17. This proportion has remained stable over the past six years, with single job holders averaging 85.0% and multiple job holders averaging 15.0%.

Jobs by gender

In the Australian Capital Territory , the number of jobs held in 2016-17 was greater for males (50.4%) compared to females (49.6%). This was consistent at the national level, with males working across 52.0% of all jobs, compared to females, who worked across 48.0% of total jobs during 2016-17. In the Australian Capital Territory, the number of jobs held by males increased by 4.1%, and the number of jobs held by females increased by 3.7% over the past 12 months.

Compared to 2011-12, the number of jobs held by both males and females increased (up 6.4% and 7.0% respectively) in the Australian Capital Territory. Nationally, the increase in the number of jobs was a result of growth in jobs by both genders over the previous 12 months and six years. The growth rate in the number of jobs held by females was greater than males over the time series (7.9% compared to 5.1% respectively).

Jobs by age

In 2016-17, across the Australian Capital Territory, the highest number of jobs were held by people in the 25 to 29 year age group (48,300 jobs), with males in this age group holding a slightly higher proportion of the jobs than females (50.6% and 49.4% respectively). Over the past six years, this age group filled the most number of jobs in the Australian Capital Territory.

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This was also consistent at the national level, with 2.6 million jobs held by people in this age group and males holding a higher proportion of the jobs than females (52.2% and 47.8% respectively) during 2016-17. Similarly, this age group also held the highest number of jobs over the past six years across Australia.

Type of employment

Of the 350,000 jobs in the Australian Capital Territory in 2016-17, 93.2% of them were employee jobs (footnote 3) and 6.8% were jobs worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. This development was also consistent at the national level, with 89.5% of all jobs being employee jobs, and only 10.5% being worked by owner managers of unincorporated enterprises. These proportions have been relatively stable over the six years at both the Australian Capital Territory and national level.

Median income

The median income per job (footnote 4) in Australian Capital Territory was $54,800 in 2016-17. Since 2011-12, the median income per job grew by 10.6% in the Australian Capital Territory.

By gender, the male median income per job was higher than the female median in the Australian Capital Territory consecutively throughout all six years of data. Since 2011-12, the male median income per job grew by 9.6% in the Australian Capital Territory. Over the same period, the female median income per job increased by 13.0% in the Australian Capital Territory.

Nationally, the median income per job was $43,200 in 2016-17, lower than the Australian Capital Territory median of $54,800. Similarly, the median income per job for males was also higher than for females ($52,700 and $34,900 respectively) during 2016-17, as well as over the previous six years.

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Industry

In the Australian Capital Territory, the five key industries that supplied the most jobs during 2016-17 were Public administration and safety, Professional, scientific and technical services, Accommodation and food services, Health care and social assistance and Administration and support services. Over the past 12 months, the number of jobs in all of these industries increased.

In comparison, the highest employing industries in Australia during 2016-17 were Health care and social assistance, Retail trade, Administration and support services, Education and training, and Accommodation and food services. Over the past 12 months, there was jobs growth in all of these industries.

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Occupation

In 2016-17, the most common occupations nationally were Professionals (18.2% of all occupations), Clerical and administrative workers (11.5%), and Managers (10.7%). In the Australian Capital Territory , the most common were Professionals (22.1%), Clerical and administrative workers (17.7%), and Managers (16.0%).

Differences in male and female employment in occupations continued to be pronounced in the Australian Capital Territory. Jobs worked by Managers, Technicians and trades workers, Machinery operators and drivers, and Labourers were most likely to be held by males, while those worked by Professionals, Community and personal service workers, Clerical and administrative workers, and Sales workers were most likely to be held by females.

Footnotes

The ABS would like to acknowledge the collaboration and support of the Northern Territory Department of Treasury and Finance in analysing the state and territory level statistics and developing the eight state and territory spotlights in this release.

  1. "Jobs in the Australian Capital Territory" refers to jobs worked by people living in that region.
  2. The job counts in this publication differ from the filled job estimates from other data sources such as the Australian Labour Account and the Labour Force Australia. The Jobs in Australia data sourced from LEED provides insights into all jobs held throughout the year, while the Labour Account data provides the number of filled jobs at a point-in-time each quarter, and Labour Force Survey data measures the number of people employed each month.
  3. Employee jobs include owner managers of incorporated enterprises as these employees cannot be separately identified from other employees in this publication.
  4. Median employment income per job is based on filled employee jobs during the reference year. It has been adjusted to account for the duration the job was held. For further detail, see the Explanatory Notes.

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Table 1. All jobs

Table 2. Employee jobs

Table 3. Employee jobs - detailed industry

Table 4. Multiple job holders

Table 5. Owner managers of unincorporated enterprises

Table 6. Employed persons

Table 7. New South Wales spotlights by local government areas

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Table 8. Victoria spotlights by local government areas

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Table 9. Queensland spotlights by local government areas

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Table 10. South Australia spotlights by local government areas

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Table 11. Western Australia spotlights by local government areas

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Table 12. Tasmania spotlights by local government areas

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Table 13. Northern Territory spotlights by local government areas

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Table 14. Australian Capital Territory spotlight

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History of changes

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18/08/2020 - The unit of measurement in the bracket in the fourth column heading of Table 2 (Regional Comparison) within the Key findings section was corrected from ‘billion’ to ‘million’.

Previous catalogue number

This release previously used catalogue number 6160.0.