Latest release

Consumer Price Index, Australia

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) measures household inflation and includes statistics about price change for categories of household expenditure

Reference period
June 2021
Released
28/07/2021
Future Releases
  • Next Release 27/10/2021
    Consumer Price Index, Australia, September 2021
  • Next Release 25/01/2022
    Consumer Price Index, Australia, December 2021
  • View all releases

Key statistics

  • The Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose 0.8% this quarter.
  • Over the twelve months to the June 2021 quarter, the CPI rose 3.8%.
  • The most significant price rise was Automotive fuel (+6.5%).

What's new this quarter

  • This release contains additional graphs and content to highlight the main stories for the June quarter. The ABS plans to continue to provide similar analysis in the CPI release each quarter. Feedback is welcome via prices.statistics@abs.gov.au.
  • International holiday travel and accommodation was measured in the CPI in the June 2021 quarter, having been imputed since the June 2020 quarter. Prices were used for travel to New Zealand following the commencement of quarantine-free travel between Australia and New Zealand from April 2021. The International holiday travel and accommodation series has a weight of 0.08% of the CPI, following The 2020 annual re-weight of the CPI.
  • A review of the seasonally adjusted series was conducted in the June quarter. An update of the changes is provided in this release under 'Seasonal adjustment review'.
  • In May 2021 an article was published on Measuring Non-discretionary and Discretionary Inflation. These measures will be included in the CPI release each quarter, beginning the September 2021 quarter. For more information on these measures, refer to the article or contact prices.statistics@abs.gov.au.

Main features

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Weighted average of eight capital cities
 Mar Qtr 2021 to Jun Qtr 2021Jun Qtr 2020 to Jun Qtr 2021
% change% change
All groups CPI0.83.8
Food and non-alcoholic beverages0.50.7
Alcohol and tobacco0.46.7
Clothing and footwear0.40.3
Housing0.3-0.2
Furnishings, household equipment and services1.116.9
Health1.54.8
Transport2.810.7
Communication-0.6-1.3
Recreation and culture-0.12.5
Education0.03.7
Insurance and financial services0.30.6
CPI analytical series
 All groups CPI, seasonally adjusted0.83.7
 Trimmed mean0.51.6
 Weighted median0.51.7

Overview

Annual CPI inflation increased to 3.8% in the June quarter

The increase in annual CPI inflation includes some 'base effects' following the introduction of free child care and a record fall in fuel prices in the June 2020 quarter. The Trimmed mean and Weighted median are measures of underlying inflation which exclude large, one-off price impacts. Trimmed mean annual inflation was 1.6% in the June quarter, which has increased from 1.1% in the March quarter.

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Automotive fuel prices surpass March 2020 quarter pre-COVID levels

A resurgence in global demand for oil saw fuel prices rebound to above pre-COVID March 2020 quarter levels in the June 2021 quarter.

A feature article exploring the history of Automotive fuel in the CPI was recently released.

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New dwelling prices continue to be impacted by housing grants

The Federal government's HomeBuilder and state-based housing construction grants in Western Australia and Tasmania continue to have a significant impact on the New dwelling purchase by owner occupier series. 

Prices for new dwellings fell 0.1% in the June 2021 quarter. Without the offset from the housing grants, the new dwellings series would have risen 1.9%, reflecting demand driven increases in materials and labour costs. 

It is expected that these grants will continue to impact the measurement of new dwelling purchases over the next few quarters as applications are finalised and grants are paid.

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Domestic airfare prices continue to fall

Following the announcement of the Federal government's half price airfares package coupled with increased airline competition, domestic airfare prices have continued to fall in the June 2021 quarter. 

Domestic airfare prices have fallen 14.4% compared to the pre-COVID March 2020 quarter, while accommodation prices have risen 5.3% over the same period following increased demand.

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Two speed rental market across capital cities

While rents for Sydney and Melbourne have fallen when compared to the pre-COVID March 2020 quarter, rents in most cities have increased, which reflects record low vacancy rates in those cities.

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Main contributors to change

CPI groups

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Food and non-alcoholic beverages group (+0.5%)

  • Vegetables (+5.5%) and Fruit (+4.7%) both rose due to a shortage of pickers, extreme rainfall on the east coast of Australia and Cyclone Niran affecting banana crop yields. 
  • Beef and veal rose 3.6% with farmers continuing to re-build herds, reducing meat supply. 
  • Takeaway and fast foods (-0.7%) and Restaurant meals (-0.6%) partially offset the rise, due to the NSW 'Dine & Discover' and City of Melbourne 'Melbourne Money' voucher schemes. These voucher schemes have the effect of reducing out-of-pockets costs.

In seasonally adjusted terms, the group rose 0.8%. The main contributors were Vegetables (+6.6%), Fruit (+5.1%) and Beef and veal (+4.2%). 

Over the past twelve months, the group rose 0.7% due to price rises related to labour shortages, severe weather events and herd re-stocking. Price rises were partially offset by easing of drought conditions and the introduction of voucher schemes.

Alcohol and tobacco group (+0.4%)

  • Alcohol rose 0.3% due to general price rises across both dine-in and takeaway establishments. The effect of the increase in the bi-annual excise tax for alcohol on 1 February 2021 also flowed into this quarter.

In seasonally adjusted terms, the group rose 1.0%. The main contributor was Tobacco (+1.9%).

Over the past twelve months, the group rose 6.7%. The main contributor was Tobacco (+14.3%).

Clothing and footwear group (+0.4%)

  • Garments rose 1.0% due to the introduction of new season winter stock.
  • Accessories fell 2.6% due to promotional activity.

In seasonally adjusted terms, the group fell 0.6%. The main contributor was Accessories (-2.6%).

Over the past twelve months, the group rose 0.3%. The main contributor was Accessories (+3.0%).

Housing group (+0.3%)

  • Electricity rose 3.3%, driven by Perth (+91.2%). The increase in Perth is due to the unwinding of the Western Australian government's $600 electricity credit introduced in the December quarter 2020. Without the impact from the credit, Electricity would have fallen 2.0% as retailers reduced prices across most capital cities.
  • Rents rose 0.1% with falls in Sydney and Melbourne offset by continued strength from the other capital cities. Weak rental conditions in Sydney and Melbourne are reflected by high vacancy rates compared to the other capital cities.
  • New dwelling purchase by owner occupiers fell 0.1%. HomeBuilder and state-based housing construction grants in WA and Tasmania continued to have a significant impact. Without the impact of the government grants, the New dwelling series would have risen 1.9%, reflecting price increases in materials and labour in response to strong demand.

In seasonally adjusted terms, the group rose 0.7%. The main contributor was Electricity (+6.0%).

Over the past twelve months the group fell 0.2%. The main contributor to the fall was Electricity (-5.9%).

Furnishings, household equipment and services group (+1.1%)

This group includes household furnishings and services provided to households, including child care.

  • Furniture rose 3.8% with strong demand for timber and supply constraints contributing to price rises in timber-based furniture.

In seasonally adjusted terms the group rose 0.6%. The main contributor was Child care (+1.7%).

Over the past twelve months the group rose 16.9%. The main contributor was Child care due to the unwinding of free child care introduced in the June 2020 quarter. Excluding the impact of Child care, the group would have risen 1.0% over the past twelve months.

Health group (+1.5%)

  • Medical and hospital services (+2.4%) rose due to increases in private health insurance (PHI) premiums on the 1 April 2021. 

In seasonally adjusted terms the group rose 0.3%. Medical and hospital services (+0.5%) was the main contributor.

Over the past twelve months the group rose 4.8%. Medical and hospital services (+6.7%) was the main contributor.

Transport group (+2.8%)

  • Automotive fuel rose 6.5% due to continued recovery in global oil prices following COVID-19 lockdowns. Fuel prices have surpassed pre-pandemic March 2020 quarter price levels.
  • Motor vehicles rose 2.2% due to continued strength in consumer demand combined with supply constraints such as a global semi-conductor shortage. 

In seasonally adjusted terms, the group rose 2.9%. The main contributor was Automotive fuel (+6.5%).

Over the past twelve months the group rose 10.7%. Automotive fuel (+27.3%) and Motor vehicles (+7.4%) were the main contributors.

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Communication group (-0.6%)

  • Telecommunication equipment and services fell 0.7% due to discounts on phones.

The group is not seasonally adjusted.

Over the past twelve months the group fell 1.3%.

Recreation and culture group (-0.1%)

  • Domestic holiday travel and accommodation fell 1.3% due to lower domestic airfare prices. Increased competition and the Federal government's tourism package, which included subsidised airfares to selected destinations, drove the fall. Domestic accommodation price rises partially offset the fall, with accommodation operators in Queensland experiencing higher demand following the commencement of half-price airfares, particularly the Gold Coast, Cairns and Sunshine Coast regions.
  • International holiday travel and accommodation rose 8.6% following the commencement of quarantine-free travel between Australia and New Zealand from April 2021. International travel was measured using prices for travel to New Zealand in the CPI in the June 2021 quarter, having been imputed since the June 2020 quarter. 

In seasonally adjusted terms, the group rose 0.5%. Domestic holiday travel and accommodation (+1.5%) was the main contributor.

Over the past twelve months the group rose 2.5%. Domestic holiday travel and accommodation (+4.5%) was the main contributor.

Education group (0.0%)

  • The Education group recorded no movement this quarter.

In seasonally adjusted terms, the group rose 0.9% this quarter. The main contributor was Preschool and primary education (+1.1%).

Over the past twelve months, the group rose 3.7%. Preschool and primary education (+18.5%) was the main contributor.

Insurance and financial services group (+0.3%)

  • Insurance (+1.3%) was the main contributor to the rise. 

In seasonally adjusted terms, the group rose 0.4%.

Over the past twelve months the group rose 0.6%.

International trade exposure - tradable and non-tradables

The tradables and non-tradables series measure the contribution of goods and services that are highly exposed to international trade influences (tradables), and those that are mostly influenced by domestic factors (non-tradables), to overall household inflation. Examples of tradables include automotive fuel, most food items, and clothing and footwear. Examples of non-tradables include housing and education.

Tradables (+1.5% quarter, +3.6% annual)

  • Tradable goods component rose 1.5% due to Automotive fuel (+6.5%)
  • Tradable services component rose 2.7%.

Non-tradables (+0.3% quarter, +4.0% annual)

  • Non-tradable goods component rose 0.3% due to Electricity (+3.3%).
  • Non-tradable services component rose 0.4% due to Medical and hospital services (+2.4%).

In seasonally adjusted terms, the tradables component of the All groups CPI rose 1.4% and the non-tradables component rose 0.6%.

Underlying inflation series

The Trimmed mean and the Weighted median provide measures of underlying inflation. These measures reduce the impact of irregular or temporary price changes in the CPI. For more information see Underlying Inflation Measures: Explaining the Trimmed Mean and Weighted Median.

In the June 2021 quarter:

  • The Trimmed mean rose 0.5%, following a revised rise of 0.4% in the March 2021 quarter.
  • Over the past twelve months to the June 2021 quarter, the Trimmed mean rose 1.6%, following a rise of 1.1% over the twelve months to the March 2021 quarter.
  • The Weighted median rose 0.5% following a rise of 0.4% in the March 2021 quarter.
  • Over the past twelve months, the Weighted median rose 1.7%, following a rise of 1.3% over the twelve months to the March 2021 quarter.

Seasonally adjusted analytical series

Seasonal adjustment is the process by which regular, calendar related effects are removed from the original series.

  • All groups CPI seasonally adjusted rose 0.8% for the quarter and 3.7% for the year.
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Mar Qtr 2021 to Jun Qtr 2021 percentage change
 Original (%)Seasonally Adjusted (%)
All groups CPI0.80.8
Food and non-alcoholic beverages0.50.8
Alcohol and tobacco0.41.0
Clothing and footwear0.4-0.6
Housing0.30.7
Furnishings, household equipment and services1.10.6
Health1.50.3
Transport2.82.9
Communication(a)-0.6-0.6
Recreation and culture-0.10.5
Education0.00.9
Insurance and financial services0.30.4
International trade exposure series  
 Tradables1.51.4
 Non-tradables0.30.6

a. Not seasonally adjusted

A detailed explanation of the seasonal adjustment of the All Groups CPI and calculation of the trimmed mean and weighted median measures is available in Information Paper: Seasonal Adjustment of Consumer Price Indexes, 2011 (cat. no. 6401.0.55.003). Revisions to the seasonally adjusted estimates can be the result of the application of concurrent seasonal adjustment, described on the methodology page.

Capital cities comparison

All groups CPI

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All groups CPI, All groups index numbers and percentage changes
 Index number(a)Percentage change
 Jun Qtr 2021Mar Qtr 2021 to Jun Qtr 2021Jun Qtr 2020 to Jun Qtr 2021
Sydney119.40.84.1
Melbourne119.10.32.9
Brisbane119.20.84.9
Adelaide117.80.52.8
Perth116.81.94.2
Hobart119.81.13.6
Darwin115.61.06.1
Canberra118.20.84.8
Weighted average of eight capital cities118.80.83.8

a. Index reference period: 2011-12 = 100.0.

In all capital cities:

  • Automotive fuel rose, driven by the continued recovery of global oil prices following COVID-19 lockdowns. Automotive fuel price rises in the June quarter ranged from Adelaide (+3.0%) to Darwin (+10.1%).
  • Medical and hospital services rose, due to the annual increase in private health insurance premiums. 
  • Fruit and vegetables rose in all capital cities ranging from Perth (+2.8%) to Sydney (+6.3%). Price rises were due to a shortage of pickers, extreme rainfall on the east coast of Australia and Cyclone Niran affecting banana crop yields.

Capital city highlights:

At the All groups level, the CPI rose in all eight capital cities, ranging from 0.3% in Melbourne to 1.9% in Perth. The differences across the capital cities at the All groups level was mainly due to the Housing group.

Sydney (+0.8%)

  • Automotive fuel (+7.1%).

  • New dwelling purchase by owner occupiers (+1.5%).

  • Restaurant meals (-2.3%) and Takeaway and fast foods (-2.5%) both fell due to the NSW Government's 'Dine & Discover' vouchers, which reduces out-of-pocket costs.

  • Rents (-0.6%) fell due to weak demand reflected in high vacancy rates, particularly in attached dwellings.

Sydney recorded an annual rise of 4.1%.

Melbourne (+0.3%)

Melbourne recorded the smallest rise of all capital cities. 

  • Automotive fuel rose 5.9%, which was the second lowest price rise of the eight capital cities in the June quarter.
  • Vegetables (+6.2%)
  • New dwelling purchase by owner occupier fell 2.6% due to price rises being completely offset by the HomeBuilder grant.
  • Rents (-0.5%) fell due to weak demand reflected in high vacancy rates, particularly in attached dwellings.

Melbourne recorded an annual rise of 2.9%.

Brisbane (+0.8%)

  • Automotive fuel (+7.2%) 

  • Domestic holiday and travel accommodation (+4.0%)

Brisbane recorded an annual rise of 4.9%.

Adelaide (+0.5%)

  • Medical and hospital services (+3.4%).

  • Automotive fuel (+3.0%).

  • Electricity (-2.1%)

Adelaide recorded an annual rise of 2.8%, the smallest of all capital cities.

Perth (+1.9%)

  • Perth recorded the strongest rise of all capital cities.

  • Electricity (+91.2%)

  • Automotive fuel (+7.3%)

  • Rents (+2.6%) due to strong demand reflected in low vacancy rates, as well as the end of the moratorium on rental reviews.

Perth recorded an annual rise of 4.2%.

Following the unwinding of the Western Australian government's $600 household electricity credit, introduced in the December 2020 quarter, electricity costs in Perth rose 91% in the June quarter. This comes off the back of a 67% fall in the December 2020 quarter and 42% rise in the March 2021 quarter.

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Hobart (+1.1%)

  • Automotive fuel (+9.1%), which was the second largest price rise in the June quarter.

  • New dwelling purchase by owner occupier (+2.6%).

  • Rents (+1.6%) due to continued strong levels of demand reflected in low vacancy rates.

Hobart recorded an annual rise of 3.6%.

Darwin (+1.0%)

  • Domestic holiday travel and accommodation (+17.5%) due to increased seasonal demand. 
  • Automotive fuel (+10.1%).

Darwin recorded an annual rise of 6.1%, the strongest of all capital cities.

Canberra (+0.8%)

  • Automotive fuel (+6.7%).

  • New dwelling purchase by owner occupier (+0.9%).

  • Fruit (+6.1%).

Canberra recorded an annual rise of 4.8%.

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Quarterly percentage change by capital city
GroupSydneyMelbourneBrisbaneAdelaidePerthHobartDarwinCanberraWeighted average of eight capital cities
All groups0.80.30.80.51.91.11.00.80.8
Food & non-alcoholic beverages-0.11.00.80.90.40.70.80.90.5
Alcohol & tobacco0.50.30.40.20.50.70.10.20.4
Clothing & footwear0.91.2-0.81.0-0.91.3-2.0-0.40.4
Housing0.2-1.30.5-0.46.51.60.50.60.3
Furnishings, household equipment and services1.21.20.91.40.80.20.60.91.1
Health1.91.01.42.21.61.20.90.61.5
Transport3.52.72.51.23.23.94.02.62.8
Communication-0.6-0.5-0.5-0.6-0.7-0.7-0.5-0.4-0.6
Recreation & culture-0.1-0.81.3-0.2-0.2-0.14.50.2-0.1
Education0.10.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.0
Insurance & financial services0.40.01.40.50.20.9-0.80.90.3

Seasonal adjustment review

In the June 2020 quarter release of the CPI, the ABS reviewed the method used to produce seasonally adjusted estimates for CPI series with significant and prolonged impacts from COVID-19. The ABS advised that the method for affected series had changed from the ‘concurrent’ method to the ‘forward factors’ method. This was outlined in Measuring the CPI during a time of COVID-19 under 'Seasonal Adjustment in the CPI'.

The ABS has since conducted an extensive review of the seasonally adjusted estimates in the CPI. The findings from the review have led to the following changes being implemented in the June 2021 quarter CPI release:

  • The concurrent seasonal adjustment method will replace the use of forward factors, which has been in place since the June 2020 quarter. This affects three CPI series: Child care; Medical and hospital services; and Preschool and primary education.
  • The 'Audio, visual and computing equipment and services' series will switch from non-seasonally adjusted to seasonally adjusted.
  • The 'Accessories' series will switch from seasonally adjusted to non-seasonally adjusted.

Review of imputed series

In the June 2020 quarter, estimates for five series (Urban transport fares; Domestic holiday travel and accommodation; International holiday travel and accommodation; Sports participation; and Other recreational, sporting and cultural services) were imputed from the headline CPI.  For the seasonally adjusted estimates, the same approach was used for the five series, which saw the quarterly movement imputed from the aggregate level seasonally adjusted CPI. This approach was used for all subsequent quarters wherever imputation was necessary. 

Following the 2021 seasonal adjustment review, the approach for calculating the seasonally adjusted estimates from the June 2020 quarter for the five series has changed. To calculate the seasonally adjusted estimates, the usual method will be used where the seasonal adjustment factors for these series will now be applied to the original estimates for each series to derive a seasonally adjusted movement. This replaces the method of the quarterly movement being imputed from the aggregate level seasonally adjusted CPI.  

As a result of these changes, there are larger than usual revisions in previous quarters for the affected seasonally adjusted series. Seasonal patterns can be significantly impacted by temporary shocks such as border closures and lockdowns. Caution should be used when interpreting seasonally adjusted estimates during this period.

These changes do not affect the seasonally adjusted estimates in the current quarter or future quarters. Nor do they impact any CPI series in original terms, including the headline CPI.

Selected tables - capital cities

All groups CPI, index numbers(a)

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All groups CPI, Index numbers(a)
PeriodSydneyMelbourneBrisbaneAdelaidePerthHobartDarwinCanberraWeighted average of eight capital cities
2021 June119.4119.1119.2117.8116.8119.8115.6118.2118.8
2021 March118.5118.8118.2117.2114.6118.5114.4117.3117.9
2020 December118.0118.4117.5116.5113.0117.6111.5116.3117.2
2020 September116.8116.7116.2115.7114.1116.7110.8115.4116.2
2020 June114.7115.7113.6114.6112.1115.6109.0112.8114.4
2020 March117.4117.8116.2115.8113.5117.2111.8115.5116.6
2019 December117.1116.9116.3115.4113.1116.7111.5115.0116.2
2019 September116.5115.9115.5114.5112.6114.7111.3114.3115.4
2019 June115.9115.3114.8113.7112.0114.1111.0113.5114.8
2019 March115.1114.7114.1113.1111.2113.4110.1113.2114.1
2018 December115.2114.6114.0113.0111.3113.6111.0113.1114.1
2018 September114.7114.0113.4112.4110.8112.2110.8112.3113.5
2018 June114.0113.8112.9112.1110.2111.5110.1111.6113.0
2018 March113.6113.3112.4111.6110.0111.1109.7111.2112.6
2017 December113.3112.3112.3111.2109.9110.3109.7110.3112.1
2017 September112.5111.5111.4110.4109.5109.2109.4109.6111.4
2017 June111.7111.0111.0109.2109.0108.9108.8108.6110.7
2020-21118.2118.3117.8116.8114.6118.2113.1116.8117.5
2019-20116.4116.6115.4115.1112.8116.1110.9114.4115.7
2018-19115.2114.7114.1113.1111.3113.3110.7113.0114.1
2017-18113.4112.7112.3111.3109.9110.5109.7110.7112.3

a. Unless otherwise specified, reference period of each index: 2011-12 = 100.0.

All groups CPI, percentage changes

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Percentage change (from previous financial year)
PeriodSydneyMelbourneBrisbaneAdelaidePerthHobartDarwinCanberraWeighted average of eight capital cities
2020-211.51.42.11.51.61.82.02.11.6
2019-201.01.71.21.81.32.40.21.21.3
2018-191.71.71.61.51.32.50.92.11.6
2017-182.02.31.72.30.92.11.02.41.9
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Percentage change (from corresponding quarter of previous year)
PeriodSydneyMelbourneBrisbaneAdelaidePerthHobartDarwinCanberraWeighted average of eight capital cities
2021 June4.12.94.92.84.23.66.14.83.8
2021 March0.90.81.71.21.01.12.31.61.1
2020 December0.81.31.01.0-0.10.80.01.10.9
2020 September0.30.70.61.01.31.7-0.41.00.7
2020 June-1.00.3-1.00.80.11.3-1.8-0.6-0.3
2020 March2.02.71.82.42.13.41.52.02.2
2019 December1.62.02.02.11.62.70.51.71.8
2019 September1.61.71.91.91.62.20.51.81.7
2019 June1.71.31.71.41.62.30.81.71.6
2019 March1.31.21.51.31.12.10.41.81.3
2018 December1.72.01.51.61.33.01.22.51.8
2018 September2.02.21.81.81.22.71.32.51.9
2018 June2.12.51.72.71.12.41.22.82.1
2018 March2.12.21.72.30.92.01.12.41.9
2017 December2.22.21.92.30.82.11.02.21.9
2017 September1.92.21.51.80.82.00.62.11.8
2017 June2.22.21.81.60.72.30.52.11.9
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Percentage change (from previous quarter)
PeriodSydneyMelbourneBrisbaneAdelaidePerthHobartDarwinCanberraWeighted average of eight capital cities
2021 June0.80.30.80.51.91.11.00.80.8
2021 March0.40.30.60.61.40.82.60.90.6
2020 December1.01.51.10.7-1.00.80.60.80.9
2020 September1.80.92.31.01.81.01.72.31.6
2020 June-2.3-1.8-2.2-1.0-1.2-1.4-2.5-2.3-1.9
2020 March0.30.8-0.10.30.40.40.30.40.3
2019 December0.50.90.70.80.41.70.20.60.7
2019 September0.50.50.60.70.50.50.30.70.5
2019 June0.70.50.60.50.70.60.80.30.6
2019 March-0.10.10.10.1-0.1-0.2-0.80.10.0
2018 December0.40.50.50.50.51.20.20.70.5
2018 September0.60.20.40.30.50.60.60.60.4
2018 June0.40.40.40.40.20.40.40.40.4
2018 March0.30.90.10.40.10.70.00.80.4
2017 December0.70.70.80.70.41.00.30.60.6
2017 September0.70.50.41.10.50.30.60.90.6
2017 June0.40.10.50.10.00.00.30.00.2

Longer term series: all groups CPI, weighted average of eight capital cities, index numbers

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 31 March no.30 June no.30 September no.31 December no.
2021117.9118.8  
2020116.6114.4116.2117.2
2019114.1114.8115.4116.2
2018112.6113.0113.5114.1
2017110.5110.7111.4112.1
2016108.2108.6109.4110.0
2015106.8107.5108.0108.4
2014105.4105.9106.4106.6
2013102.4102.8104.0104.8
201299.9100.4101.8102.0
201198.399.299.899.8
201095.295.896.596.9
200992.592.993.894.3
200890.391.692.792.4
200786.687.788.389.1
200684.585.986.786.6
200582.182.683.483.8
200480.280.680.981.5
200378.678.679.179.5
200276.176.677.177.6
200173.974.574.775.4
200069.770.272.973.1
199967.868.168.769.1
199867.067.467.567.8
199767.166.966.666.8
199666.266.766.967.0
199563.864.765.566.0
199461.561.962.362.8
199360.660.861.161.2
199259.959.759.860.1
199158.959.059.359.9
199056.257.157.559.0
198951.753.054.255.2
198848.449.350.251.2
198745.346.046.847.6
198641.442.143.244.4
198537.938.839.740.5

a. nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)

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Using price indexes

Price indexes in contracts

Price indexes published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) provide summary measures of the movements in various categories of prices over time. They are published primarily for use in Government economic analysis. Price indexes are also often used in contracts by businesses and government to adjust payments and/or charges to take account of changes in categories of prices (Indexation Clauses).

Use of Price Indexes in Contracts that sets out a range of issues that should be taken into account by parties considering including an Indexation Clause in a contract using an ABS published price index.

Frequently asked questions

The Frequently Asked Questions page that has answers to a number of common questions to do with price indexes and the Consumer Price Index, in particular.

Previous catalogue number

This release previously used catalogue number 6401.0.