TableBuilder: Work-Related Training and Adult Learning, Australia

Provides data about formal and non-formal learning activities undertaken by Australians, with a particular focus on work-related training

Introduction

This product provides a range of information about the release of microdata from the 2016-17 Work-Related Training and Adult Learning (WRTAL) survey, including details about the survey methodology and how to use the microdata product; TableBuilder. A TableBuilder is an online tool for creating tables and graphs. A data item list and information on the conditions of use and the quality of the microdata, as well as the definitions used, are also provided.

Microdata are the most detailed information available from a survey and are generally the responses to individual questions on the questionnaire or data derived from two or more questions.

The WRTAL survey was conducted throughout Australia from July 2016 to June 2017 and is designed to provide annual statistics about the formal and non-formal learning activities of the population.

Further information about this product, and other information to assist users in understanding and accessing microdata in general, is available from the Microdata Entry Page. Before applying for access, users should read and familiarise themselves with the information contained in the TableBuilder, User Guide.

Applying for access

To apply for access to TableBuilder, register and apply in the Registration Centre.

Further information on access steps can be found in How to Apply for Microdata.

Further information about the survey and the microdata can be found in the various pages associated with this product, including:

  • A detailed list of data items for the 2016-17 WRTALTableBuilder, available in the Data downloads section.
  • The Quality Declaration and Abbreviations sections.

Support

For further support in the use of this product, please contact Microdata Access Strategies on 02 6252 7714 or via microdata.access@abs.gov.au.

Data available on request

Data collected in the survey but not included in TableBuilder may be available from the ABS, on request, as statistics in tabulated form.

Subject to confidentiality and sampling variability constraints, special tabulations can be produced incorporating data items, populations and geographic areas selected to meet individual requirements. These are available, on request, on a fee for service basis. Contact the National Information and Referral Service on 1300 135 070 or client.services@abs.gov.au for further information.

Privacy

The ABS Privacy Policy outlines how the ABS handles any personal information that you provide to us.

Survey methodology

General information about the 2016-17 Work-Related Training and Adult Learning (WRTAL) survey, including summary results, are available in the publication Work-Related Training and Adult Learning, Australia (cat. no. 4234.0).

Detailed information about the survey including scope and coverage, survey design, data collection methodology, weighting, estimation and benchmarking, estimate reliability and a glossary can be accessed from the Explanatory Notes page of that publication. All published summary tables, in Excel spreadsheet format, can be accessed from the Data downloads section.

File structure and content

File structure

The 2016-17 Work-Related Training and Adult Learning (WRTAL) survey TableBuilder is structured as a single person level file. This person level includes general demographic information about each survey respondent such as their age, sex, country of birth and labour force status, as well as details about their recent education and training activities.

When tabulating data from TableBuilder, person weights are automatically applied to the underlying sample counts to provide the survey's population estimates.

The data items included in the 2016-17 WRTAL TableBuilder are grouped under broad headings and subheadings as shown in the image below. A complete data item list can be accessed from the Data downloads section.

Example file structure

File content

Multi-response data items

A number of questions included in the WRTAL survey allowed respondents to provide one or more responses. These data items can be identified in the data item list from the Data downloads section by the following label <multiple response>. The sum of individual multi-response categories will be greater than the population or number of people applicable to the particular data item as respondents are able to select more than one response.

For WRTAL the following data items are multiple response:

All reasons for participating in highest formal learning in last 12 months
All reasons for undertaking most recent work-related training
All methods used to deliver most recent work-related training
All reasons for undertaking most recent personal interest learning
All reasons did not participate in (more) non-formal learning
All sources of personal income

Not applicable categories

Most data items included in the TableBuilder file include a 'Not applicable' category. The classification values of these 'Not applicable' categories, where relevant, are shown in the data item list in the Data downloads section. The 'Not applicable' category generally represents the number of people who were not asked a particular question or the number of people excluded from the population for a data item when that data was derived (e.g. Year of Arrival in Australia is not applicable for people born in Australia).

Table populations

The population relevant to each data item is identified in the data item list and should be kept in mind when extracting and analysing data. The actual population estimate for each data item is equal to the total cumulative frequency minus the 'Not applicable' category.

Generally, all populations, including very specific populations, can be 'filtered' using other relevant data items. For example, if the population of interest is 'Employed persons', any data item with that population (excluding the 'Not applicable' category) could be used. While any applicable data item can be used for this filtering process, the WRTAL TableBuilder also includes some data items that have been specifically derived for this purpose. For example, the population data item 'Persons aged 15–24 years' can be used to filter this population rather than the actual age group data item. The specifically derived population data items are listed in the data item list and are included in the 'Populations' folder in the TableBuilder product.

Using TableBuilder

For general information relating to TableBuilder and instructions on how to use the features of the TableBuilder product, please refer to the TableBuilder, User Guide (cat. no. 1406.0.55.005).

More specific information applicable to this 2016-17 Work-Related Training and Adult Learning (WRTAL) survey TableBuilder product, which should enable users to understand, interpret and tabulate the data, is outlined below.

Counting units and weights

Weighting is the process of adjusting results from a sample survey to infer results for the total population. To do this, a 'weight' is allocated to each sample unit. The weight is the value that indicates how many population units are represented by the sample unit.

As the format of the WRTAL TableBuilder file is at the person level, there is only one weight provided - a person weight. That is, all tables produced provide estimates of the number of people with particular characteristics. The Summation Options section in the Customise Table panel in TableBuilder contains this weight. As there is only one weight available the person weights will be automatically applied when producing tables.

Continuous data items

TableBuilder includes a number of continuous variables which can have a response value at any point along a continuum. Some continuous data items are allocated special codes for certain responses (e.g. 000 = 'Not applicable').

When creating ranges in TableBuilder for such continuous items, special codes will automatically be excluded. Therefore the total will show only 'valid responses' rather than all responses (including special codes). Continuous items with special codes have a corresponding categorical item on the Person level that provides the ability to display data for the special code. Any special codes for continuous data items are listed in the Data Item List.

Adjustment of cell values

To minimise the risk of identifying individuals in aggregate statistics, a technique is used to randomly adjust cell values. This technique is called perturbation. Perturbation involves small random adjustment of the statistics and is considered the most satisfactory technique for avoiding the release of identifiable statistics while maximising the range of information that can be released. These adjustments have a negligible impact on the underlying pattern of the statistics. After perturbation, a given published cell value will be consistent across all tables. However, adding up cell values to derive a total will not necessarily give the same result as published totals. The introduction of perturbation in publications ensures that these statistics are consistent with statistics released via services such as TableBuilder. For WRTAL, perturbation was introduced in 2016-17.

Data item list

A complete list of the data items available for use, including relevant population and classification details, can be found in the Excel spreadsheet in the Data downloads section.

The data item list spreadsheet comprises various worksheets including detail on the following topics:

  • Contents
  • Demographics
  • Geography
  • Labour force
  • Income
  • Education
  • Formal learning
  • Non-formal learning
  • Work-related training
  • Cost of work-related training
  • Time on work-related training
  • Personal interest learning
  • Barriers to non-formal learning
  • Population data items

The 'Population data items' worksheet includes those data items that have been specifically derived to enable easy filtering for particular population groups. For example, the population data item 'Persons aged 15-24 years' can be used to filter this specific population in tables rather than using the actual age group data item.

Users intending to purchase the 2016-17 WRTALTableBuilder should ensure that the data they require, and the level of detail needed, are available and applicable for the intended use.

Conditions of use

User responsibilities

The Census and Statistics Act 1905 includes a legislative guarantee to respondents that their confidentiality will be protected. This is fundamental to the trust the Australian public has in the ABS, and that trust is in turn fundamental to the excellent quality of ABS information. Without that trust, survey respondents may be less forthcoming or truthful in answering our questionnaires. For more information, see 'Avoiding inadvertent disclosure' and 'Microdata' on our web page How the ABS keeps your information confidential.

The release of microdata must satisfy the ABS legislative obligation to release information in a manner that is not likely to enable the identification of a particular person or organisation. Therefore, in accordance with the Census and Statistics Act, a confidentiality process is applied to the data in TableBuilder to avoid releasing information that may lead to the identification of individuals, families, households, dwellings or businesses.

Prior to being granted access to TableBuilder users must agree to the following ABS Terms and Conditions of TableBuilder Access.

Conditions of sale

All ABS products and services are provided subject to the ABS Conditions of Sale. Any queries relating to these Conditions of Sale should be emailed to intermediary.management@abs.gov.au.

Price

Microdata access is priced according to the ABS Pricing Policy and Commonwealth Cost Recovery Guidelines. For details refer to ABS Pricing Policy on the ABS website. For microdata prices refer to the Microdata prices web page.

Australian universities

The ABS/Universities Australia Agreement provides participating universities with access to a range of ABS products and services. This includes access to microdata. For further information, university clients should refer to the ABS/Universities Australia Agreement web page.

Citations

Information or data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics must be acknowledged responsibly whenever it is used. Citing, or referencing is important for several reasons, including acknowledging that one has used the ideas, words or data of others. Accurately citing sources used also allows others to find and use the original information. For information on how to cite ABS data refer to Help: How to cite ABS Sources.

Further information

The Microdata Entry Page contains links to microdata related information to assist users in understanding and accessing microdata. For further information users should email microdata.access@abs.gov.au or telephone (02) 6252 7714.

Privacy

The ABS Privacy Policy outlines how the ABS handles any personal information that you provide to us.

Data downloads

TableBuilder data item list

Previous releases

 TableBuilder data seriesMicrodataDownloadDataLab
Work-Related Training and Adult Learning, 2013TableBuilder  

Glossary

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Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF)

The Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) is the national policy for regulated qualifications in Australian education and training. It incorporates the qualifications from each education and training sector into a single comprehensive national qualifications framework. It was first introduced in 1995.

Certificate n.f.d. (Certificate not further defined)

Survey responses are coded to Certificate not further defined (n.f.d.) when there is not enough information to code them to Certificate I, II, III or IV in the Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED), 2001 (cat. no. 1272.0) in the Level of Education classification.

Classroom instruction

Method for delivering work-related training which generally involves a teacher, lecturer or presenter; includes but not limited to seminars, lecturers, hands-on work or practical exercises, group exercises and laboratory work.

Completed (schooling)

For schooling up to and including Year 11, the term 'completed' means attendance of a full year of school enabling the student to progress to the next year of school.

Completed (qualification)

For qualifications (including Year 12 certificate and non-school qualifications) ‘completed’ refers to successfully passing the required assessment(s) or examination(s) to gain an educational qualification.

Consultant

A consultant refers to a person or organisation hired or contracted by an employer to deliver a work-related training course.

Contact activities

Contact activities include direct contact with a teacher or instructor.

Country of birth

Country of birth has been classified according to the Standard Australian Classification of Countries (SACC), 2016 (cat. no. 1269.0).

Current main job

The job which a person was employed in during the survey reference week. In cases where the person was employed in more than one job, the current main job refers to the job in which the person usually works the most hours. However, a person may have undertaken their most recent work-related training in a previous job. Therefore several tables presented in this publication relating to work-related training are presented only for people who have undertaken training as part of their current main job.

Employed

Persons who, during the reference week: 

  • worked for one hour or more for pay, profit, commission or payment in kind in a job or business, or on a farm (comprising employees, employers and own account workers)
  • worked for one hour or more without pay in a family business or on a farm (i.e. contributing family workers)
  • were employees who had a job but were not at work and were:
  • away from work for less than four weeks up to the end of the reference week
  • away from work for more than four weeks up to the end of the reference week and received pay for some or all of the four week period to the end of the reference week
  • away from work as a standard work or shift arrangement
  • on strike or locked out
  • on workers' compensation and expected to return to their job, or
  • were employers or own account workers who had a job, business or farm, but were not at work.
Employed full-time

Employed persons who usually worked 35 hours or more a week (in all jobs) and those who, although usually working less than 35 hours a week, worked 35 hours or more during the reference week.

Employed part-time

Employed persons who usually worked less than 35 hours a week (in all jobs) and either did so during the reference week, or were not at work in the reference week.

Employee

A person who works for an employer and is paid in the form of wages or salaries, commission, commission with a retainer, piece rates or payment in kind.

External training provider

For the purpose of this survey an external training provider is defined as a person or organisation who deliver work-related training and are not classified as either an existing staff member or a consultant hired by the organisation to deliver the training.

Field not determined

Field not determined includes inadequately described responses or where no responses were given.

Field of education

Field of education is defined as the subject matter of an educational activity. It is categorised according to the Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED), 2001 (cat. no. 1272.0) field of education classification. This publication presents the main field of education studied.

Formal Learning

Formal learning activities lead to a qualification recognised by the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) such as a Degree, Diploma or Certificate and also includes study at school. Formal learning is provided in the systems of schools, colleges, universities and other institutions or organisations and is usually associated with a providing body responsible for determining the teaching method and/or curriculum, admission requirements.

Income

Gross current usual (weekly equivalent) cash receipts that are of a regular and recurring nature, and accrue to individual household members at annual or more frequent intervals, from employment, own business, the lending of assets and transfers from Government, private organisations and other households.

Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage

This is one of four Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFAs) compiled by the ABS following each Census of Population and Housing, from various characteristics of persons resident in particular areas. The Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage (IRSD) summaries attributes such as income, educational attainment, unemployment and occupation skill levels. The index refers to the area (the Statistical Area Level 1) in which a person lives, not to the socio-economic situation of the particular individual. The index ranks areas on a continuum from most disadvantaged to least disadvantaged. A low score on the index (i.e. lowest quintile or decile) indicates a high proportion of relatively disadvantaged people in an area. Such areas include many households with low income, people with no qualifications and many people in low skill occupations. It should be noted that it cannot be concluded that an area with a very high score has a large proportion of relatively advantaged ('well off') people, as there are no variables in the index to indicate this. It can only be concluded that such an area has a relatively low incidence of disadvantage. The indexes used in this publication were those compiled following the 2011 Census. For further information about the indexes, see Census of Population and Housing: Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA), 2011 (cat. no. 2033.0.55.001).

Industry

Industry data is classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006 (Revision 2.0) (cat. no. 1292.0).

Level of highest non-school qualification

A person's level of highest non-school qualification is the highest qualification a person has attained in any area of formal study other than school study. It is categorised according to the Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED), 2001 (cat. no. 1272.0) Level of education classification.

Level not determined

Level not determined includes inadequately described responses or where no responses were given.

Non-contact activities

Activities that do not involve contact with a teacher or instructor, for example undertaking research or completing assignments.

Non-formal learning

Non-formal learning activities are structured training or courses that do not form part of an award or qualification (e.g. Degree or Certificate) recognised by the Australian Qualification Framework (AQF).

Non-school qualification

Non-school qualifications are awarded for educational attainments other than those of pre-primary, primary or secondary education. They include qualifications at the Postgraduate Degree level, Master Degree level, Graduate Diploma and Graduate Certificate level, Bachelor Degree level, Advanced Diploma and Diploma level, and Certificates I, II, III and IV levels. Non-school qualifications may be attained concurrently with school qualifications.

Not in labour force

Persons who were not in the categories ‘employed’ or ‘unemployed’.

Occupation

Occupation data are classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classifications of Occupations, 2013, Version 1.2 (cat. no. 1220.0)

On-line instruction

Method for delivering work-related training; includes but not limited to self paced learning and training undertaken via the internet and lectures delivered by a teacher/instructor over the internet.

Organised learning

Consists of both formal and non-formal learning.

Own business

A person who works in their own incorporated or unincorporated business with or without employees. Own business also includes contractors and subcontractors, and people contributing to a family business.

Personal costs

Includes any cost related to the course which were paid for by the participant and not reimbursed by a third party, for example course fees or costs for study materials.

Personal income

This relates to gross income.

Personal interest learning

Structured non-formal learning courses that do not lead to a qualification, undertaken for reasons not related to work.

Qualification

Formal certification, issued by a relevant approved body, in recognition that a person has achieved an appropriate level of learning outcomes or competencies relevant to identified individual, professional, industry or community needs. Statements of attainment awarded for partial completion of a course of study at a particular level are excluded.

Quintile (Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage)

The distribution of the Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage (IRSD) scores are divided into five equal sized groups referred to as quintiles. The lowest scoring 20% of areas are given a quintile number of 1, the second-lowest 20% of areas are given a quintile number of 2 and so on, up to the highest 20% of areas which are given a quintile number of 5.

Reference week

The week preceding the week in which the interview was conducted.

Remoteness area

The Australian Standard Geographical Standard (ASGS): Volume 5 - Remoteness Structure, July 2011 (cat. no.1270.0.55.005) is used by the ABS for the dissemination of a broad range of social and demographic statistics. The classification divides Australia into six broad regions (called remoteness areas), on the basis of their relative access to service.

School study

School study is participation in primary or secondary level education, regardless of the institution or location where the study is or was undertaken. It therefore includes such study undertaken in a Technical and Further Education (TAFE) or other institution. For the purpose of this publication school study is classified as participation in formal learning.

SEIFA

See Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage

Size of business

A measure of the size of business in terms of the number of employees within that business. The business size is measured as the number of employees at the physical location where the employer works as well as the size of the business Australia-wide.

Working hours

Refers to the time when a person would usually be working.

Work-related training

Non-formal learning undertaken to obtain, maintain or improve employment related skills and/or to improve employment opportunities. Work-related training courses have a structured format but do not lead to a qualification.

Unemployed

Persons who were not employed during the reference week, and:

  • had actively looked for full-time or part-time work at any time in the four weeks up to the end of the reference week and were available for work in the reference week, or
  • were waiting to start a new job within four weeks from the end of the reference week and could have started in the reference week if the job had been available then.

Quality declaration

Institutional environment

Data on Work-Related Training and Adult Learning (WRTAL) were collected as part of the 2016–17 Multipurpose Household Survey (MPHS). For information on the institutional environment of the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), including the legislative obligations of the ABS, financing and governance arrangements, and mechanisms for scrutiny of ABS operations, please see ABS Institutional Environment.

TableBuilder files are released in accordance with the conditions specified in the Statistics Determination section of the Census and Statistics Act 1905 (CSA). This ensures that confidentiality is maintained whilst enabling micro level data to be released. TableBuilder files are released in accordance with the conditions specified in the Statistics Determination section of the Census and Statistics Act 1905 (CSA). This ensures that confidentiality is maintained whilst enabling micro level data to be released. Microdata is released using methods and systems that protect the confidentiality of people, households, and businesses. For more information about confidentiality, see the ABS Confidentiality Series and How ABS keeps your information confidential.

Relevance

The WRTAL survey provides data on formal and non-formal learning activities with a particular focus on work-related training. The type of information collected includes the reasons for participation, the personal cost of non-formal learning, and the time spent on the most recent work-related training course. Also collected was information on the barriers that prevented respondents from undertaking non-formal training.

In the MPHS, information is collected from one person selected at random in each selected household. The MPHS is a supplement to the monthly Labour Force Survey (LFS) and is designed to collect annual statistics on a small number of self-contained topics. The scope of the LFS is restricted to persons aged 15 years and over and excludes members of the permanent defence forces; certain diplomatic personnel of overseas governments usually excluded from Census and estimated resident populations; overseas residents in Australia; and members of non-Australian defence forces (and their dependants). Refer to Labour Force, Australia (cat. no. 6202.0) for further information regarding the LFS. In addition, the 2016–17 MPHS excluded persons living in Indigenous communities and persons living in non-private dwellings such as hotels, university residences, students at boarding schools, patients in hospitals, inmates of prisons and residents of other institutions (e.g. retirement homes, homes for persons with disabilities). For the WRTAL survey, the scope is persons aged 15 to 74 years. For further information about the scope of WRTAL, please refer to the Explanatory Notes.

Information from WRTAL will be used by a wide range of public and private sector agencies, in particular the Department of Education and Training, Department of Employment and state government departments with responsibilities for education and training. Data about work-related training is of particular importance as it is not collected elsewhere through administration sources.

Timeliness

The WRTAL survey was enumerated during the period from July 2016 to June 2017. As the survey reference period was the 12 months prior to the survey interview, the data relates to training and learning occurring at some time between July 2015 and June 2017. Data are released approximately six months after the end of the survey enumeration.

Accuracy

The WRTAL survey was designed to provide reliable estimates at the national level and for each state and territory. The number of completed interviews (after taking into account scope and coverage exclusions) was 25,411. This survey had a 72.1% response rate.

Two types of error are possible in an estimate based on a sample survey: non-sampling error and sampling error. Non-sampling error arises from inaccuracies in collecting, recording and processing the data. Every effort is made to minimise reporting error by the careful design of questionnaires, intensive training and supervision of interviewers, and efficient data processing procedures. Non-sampling error also arises because information cannot be obtained from all persons selected in the survey.

Sampling error occurs because a sample, rather than the entire population, is surveyed. One measure of the likely difference resulting from not including all dwellings in the survey is given by the standard error (SE). There are about two chances in three that a sample estimate will differ by less than one SE from the figure that would have been obtained if all dwellings had been included in the survey, and about 19 chances in 20 that the difference will be less than two SEs. Measures of the relative standard errors (RSE) of the estimates for this survey are included with this release.

Only estimates with RSEs less than 25% are considered sufficiently reliable for most purposes. Estimates with RSEs between 25% and 50% have been included and are annotated to indicate they are subject to high sample variability and should be used with caution. In addition, estimates with RSEs greater than 50% have also been included and annotated to indicate they are considered too unreliable for general use.

Another measure is the margin of error (MOE), which describes the distance from the population value of the estimate at a given confidence level, and is specified at a given level of confidence. Confidence levels typically used are 90%, 95% and 99%. For example, at the 95% confidence level the MOE indicates that there are about 19 chances in 20 that the estimate will differ by less than the specified MOE from the population value (the figure obtained if all dwellings had been enumerated). The MOEs in this publication are calculated at the 95% confidence level, and estimates of proportions with an MOE more than 10% are annotated to indicate they are subject to high sample variability. In addition, estimates with a corresponding standard 95% confidence interval that includes 0% or 100% are annotated to indicate they are usually considered unreliable for most purposes. For further information, please refer to the Technical Note.

The microdata generally contains finer levels of detail for data items than what is otherwise published in other formats, for example, in Work-Related Training and Adult Learning, Australia, 2016-17 (cat. no. 4234.0). For information on the level of detail provided, please refer to the data item list in the Downloads tab.

Steps to confidentialise the data made available in TableBuilder are taken in such a way as to maximise the usefulness of the content while maintaining the confidentiality of respondents selected in the survey. As a result, it may not be possible to exactly reconcile all the statistics produced from TableBuilder with other published statistics. Further information about the steps taken to confidentialise the microdata is available in How the ABS keeps your information confidential.

Coherence

The WRTAL survey was previously conducted in April 2013 as a supplement to the monthly LFS. The change of survey vehicle from a supplementary survey in 2013, to the MPHS in 2016-17 does not appear to have affected data comparability, as similar collection methodology was used, i.e. both were primarily personal telephone interviews, conducted after the LFS, with one randomly selected person from the household. The questions were the same for both surveys.

Comparison of WRTAL data and other ABS surveys such as the Survey of Education and Work (6227.0), and the Labour Force Survey should be undertaken with caution due to their different scope and sample sizes. Data from the WRTAL survey should not be directly compared to data collected in the Survey of Education and Training, Australia (cat. no. 6278.0) due to different collection methodologies used. For further information about Data Comparability, please refer to the Explanatory Notes.

Interpretability

To aid in the interpretation of the data, detailed information on concepts, definitions, terminology and other technical aspects of the survey can be found in the relevant web pages included with this release.

Accessibility

Microdata products are available to approved users. Access can be applied for through the Registration page. Users should also familiarise themselves with information available via the Microdata Entry Page.

A full list of all available microdata can be viewed via the List of expected and available Microdata.

Any queries regarding access to microdata can be forwarded to microdata.access@abs.gov.au or phone (02) 6252 7714.

The ABS Privacy Policy outlines how the ABS handles any personal information that you provide to us.

Abbreviations

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ABSAustralian Bureau of Statistics
ANZSCOAustralian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations
ANZSICAustralian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification
AQFAustralian Qualifications Framework
ASCEDAustralian Standard Classification of Education
ASGCAustralian Standard Geographical Classification
ASGSAustralian Statistical Geography Standard
CAIComputer Assisted Interviewing
ERPEstimated Resident Population
IEOIndex of Education and Occupation
IRSDIndex of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage
LFSLabour Force Survey
MOEMargin of Error
MPHSMultipurpose Household Survey
n.f.d.not further defined
RSERelative Standard Error
SA1Statistical Area Level 1
SACCStandard Australian Classification of Countries
SEStandard Error
SEIFASocio-Economic Indexes for Areas
SETSurvey of Education and Training
TAFETechnical and Further Education
WRTALWork-Related Training and Adult Learning

Previous catalogue number

This release previously used catalogue number 4234.0.30.001.