4125.0 - Gender Indicators, Australia, Nov 2019  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 01/11/2019   
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WORK AND FAMILY BALANCE

KEY FINDING

The key finding for Work and Family Balance is:

    1. Proportionally, managers in the non-public sector were more likely than those in non-managerial positions to access parental leave, either in a primary or secondary carer capacity.


DATA

The detailed data supporting the following insights are available from the Downloads tab of this publication:
    • Data Cube 10: Work and Family Balance.


INSIGHTS

Parental leave in the non-public sector

This section presents data provided to the ABS by the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA). The data discussed in this section refers to non-public organisations with 100 or more employees. Under the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012 , non-public sector employers with 100 or more employees must report annually to WGEA on the gender composition of their workforce.

WGEA defines primary parental leave as leave taken by a member of a couple or a single carer, regardless of gender, identified as having greater responsibility for the day-to-day care of a child. Secondary parental leave is defined as leave taken by a member of a couple or a single carer, regardless of gender, who is not the primary carer. Primary parental leave is the type of leave most likely to affect people's career trajectories.

In 2017–18, for non-public sector employees:
    • 94.9% of primary parental leave (paid or unpaid) was taken by women
    • 94.0% of secondary parental leave (paid or unpaid) was taken by men.

Proportionally, managers in the non-public sector were more likely than non-managers to use parental leave, either in a primary or secondary carer capacity. Around one in 14 women who were managers in the non-public sector accessed primary parental leave in 2017–18, compared with one in 24 women in non-managerial positions (a rate of 7.0 and 4.3 per 100 respectively). Primary parental leave rates for male managers and non-managers were 0.5 and 0.2 per 100 respectively.

More men used secondary parental leave (1.5 per 100 compared with 0.1 per 100 for women), with the managerial/non-managerial split for men being 2.4 and 1.4 per 100 respectively.

Overall, 95,000 women employed in the non-public sector used some form of parental leave in 2017-18, compared with 36,500 men.

Industry of employer

In 2017-18, the Mining industry continued to have the highest take up rates of primary parental leave for women: 11.2 and 11.8 women per 100 female managers and non-managers respectively. The Financial and Insurance Services industry also continued to have the highest take up rates of primary parental leave for men, with 1.1 and 1.2 men per 100 managers and non-managers respectively.

The Public Administration and Safety industry had the lowest rates of women taking primary parental leave, with 2.6 and 2.4 women per 100 female managers and non-managers respectively. This is down from 5.4 and 3.1 women per 100 female managers and non-managers in 2016-17.

No new data is available for the below topics. For analytical commentary on these topics please refer to previous versions of this publication, which can be found in the Past & Future Releases tab.
    • Overall life satisfaction
    • Volunteering
    • Providing care
    • Time Stress and Work and Family Balance
    • Time Use.