4430.0.30.002 - Microdata: Disability, Ageing and Carers, Australia, 2018 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 24/10/2019   
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File Structure

Data available by level

The 2018 Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers data is available across ten levels.


LevelInformation contained on level
Basic Microdata
TableBuilder
Detailed Microdata

1. HouseholdHousehold size and structure, including whether there is a carer and/or a person with disability in the household
Y
Y
Y
2. FamilyFamily size and structure, including whether there is a carer and/or a person with disability in the family
Y
Y
Y
3. Income UnitIncome unit size, whether there is a carer and/or a person with disability in the income unit
Y
Y
Y
4. Person (the main level)Demographic, socio-economic and health related characteristics of the survey respondents
Y
Y
Y
5. All conditionsLong-term health conditions reported in the survey
Y
Y
Y
6. RestrictionsRestrictions reported in the survey
Y
Y
Y
7. Specific ActivitiesHow much support people need to perform specific activities, such as moving about their place of residence
Y
Y
Y
8. RecipientRespondents who need help or supervision with everyday activities because of their age or disability, whose carers live in the same household.
Y
N
Y
9. Broad ActivitiesHow much support people need to perform tasks at the broad activity level (eg mobility, communication)
Y
Y
Y
10. Assistance providersPeople providing assistance to others because of age or disability, including the types of assistance they provide
Y
Y
Y


While the survey includes both households and cared-accommodation, only households are included on the Household, Family and Income Unit levels.

Relationship between levels

Datasets from the Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers are hierarchical in nature. A hierarchical data file is an efficient means of storing and retrieving information which describes one to many, or many to many, relationships (e.g. a person may report multiple long term conditions).

The following table shows the hierarchical file structure and the relationship between each level:

Level 1Level 2Level 3Level 4Levels 5-9Level 10Relationship Type

Household
1 record for each household (household only)
|_
Family
1 record for each family in household (household only)
|_
Income unit
1 record for each income unit in household (household only)
|_
Person
1 record for all persons
|_
All conditions
1 record for each condition reported
|_
Restrictions
1 record for each restriction reported
|_
Specific activities
1 record for each specific activity reported
|_
Recipient
1 record for each recipient / carer relationship
|_
Broad activities
1 record for each broad activity reported
|_
Assistance providers
1 record for each provider for each broad activity reported



The first four levels are in a hierarchical relationship, where each level is derived from the previous. A person is a member of an income unit, which is a member of a family, which is a member of a household. A household may have more than one family, while a family may have more than one income unit, and so on.

Levels 5 to 9 relate to conditions, restrictions and activities, with each a sub-level of level 4 (Person). A person can have multiple conditions and restrictions as well as require assistance with one or more activities.

Level 10 is a sub-level of level 9 (Broad activities), as it relates to the assistance provided for activities identified in level 9. An activity can be done with the assistance of one or more providers.

Using repeating datasets

Levels 5 to 10 are known as repeating datasets. They have 'one to many' relationships with the Person level, as one person can have multiple records on these levels.

For example, the All Conditions level will have a record for every condition a person reports, because it is conditions that are being counted. On this level each condition reported has the data item 'Whether reported condition is main condition' associated with it, but only one condition per person will have a value of 1 (Yes). This enables a table to be run on 'All conditions' by 'Whether reported condition is the main condition' to see which condition causes the most problems.

As at the Person level, some data items in a repeating dataset are only applicable to a particular sub-population. For instance, the item 'Whether assistance is always or sometimes required with each activity' from the Specific activities level is only applicable for activities where the respondent needs assistance. In the detailed and basic microdata files, records outside the sub-population are not included in that level of the data. In the TableBuilder records outside the sub-population will appear as ‘not applicable’.

Unit identifiers

Every record on each level of the detailed and basic microdata files is uniquely identified. The identifiers ABSHID, ABSFID, ABSIID, ABSPID, ABSCID, ABSRSID, ABSSAID, ABSRCID, ABSBAID and ABSAPID appear on all levels of the file. Where the information for the identifier is not relevant for a level, it has a value of 0.

For more information about the identifiers, see the Weights and Identifiers section of the relevant Data Item List.

Each household has a unique thirteen digit random identifier, ABSHID. This identifier appears on the Household level and is repeated on each level on each record pertaining to that household. The combination of identifiers uniquely identifies a record at a particular level as shown below:

1. Household = ABSHID
2. Family = ABSHID + ABSFID
3. Income unit = ABSHID + ABSFID + ABSIID
4. Person = ABSHID + ABSFID + ABSIID + ABSPID
5. All conditions = ABSHID + ABSFID + ABSIID + ABSPID + ABSCID
6. Restrictions = ABSHID + ABSFID + ABSIID + ABSPID + ABSRSID
7. Specific Activities = ABSHID + ABSFID + ABSIID + ABSPID + ABSSAID
8. Recipients: See below for a detailed explanation.
9. Broad Activities = ABSHID + ABSFID + ABSIID + ABSPID +ABSBAID
10. Assistance providers = ABSHID + ABSFID + ABSIID + ABSPID + ABSBAID + ABSAPID

Identifiers can be used to copy information from one level of the file to another. Some example SAS code has been provided to assist users transfer data from one level of the file to another. This is available as a SAS program with the detailed and basic microdata SAS files.

Recipient level identifiers

The Recipient level dataset includes identifiers for both the carer and the recipient(s) of care, which allows for data about either the carer or the recipient(s) of care to be copied from other levels. Care needs to be taken to ensure the correct identifiers are used when copying information between levels, to ensure that the correct person's data is copied across. To transfer information about a recipient of care from the Person level to the Recipient level, a common identifier will need to be created on the Person level.

If you require data items about the carer use the identifiers:
1. Carer = ABSHID + ABSFID + ABSIID + ABSPID

If you require data items about the recipient of care use the identifiers:
2. Recipient of care= MAPHHDRX + MAPFAMRX + MAPINCRX + MAPPSNRX

Some example SAS code has been provided to assist users transfer data from the Person level to the Recipient level. This is available as a SAS program with the detailed and basic microdata SAS files.


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