Characteristics of National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participants, 2019: Analysis of linked data

Presents analysis of service use and socio-demographic characteristics of NDIS participants in scope using a selection of key datasets from the MADIP

Released
22/09/2021

Background

ABS recently linked National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) data to the Multi-Agency Data Integration Project (MADIP). The MADIP is a secure data asset combining information on health, education, government payments, income and taxation, employment, and population demographics (including the Census) over time. NDIS data in scope of this linkage included data for all active Scheme participants as at 31 December 2019. The aim of this linkage was to test the feasibility of including NDIS data in the enduring MADIP and to showcase the utility of linked NDIS data. This analysis presents insights about the service use and sociodemographic characteristics of NDIS participants in scope using a selection of key MADIP datasets. For more information on the scope and technical details of the linkage, see the Technical Note.

Data considerations

Key definitions

MADIP Person Linkage Spine

A key piece of linking infrastructure that serves as a base dataset representing the Australian population between 2006 and 2020. Connected to the Spine are several analytical datasets providing information about various aspects of the lives of Australians, some of which have been used in the following analysis.

NDIS participants

Refers to active NDIS participants as at 31 December 2019 who linked to the MADIP spine (for more information on linkage rates, see the Technical Note).

Rest of population

Refers to the estimated Australian population based on 2016 Census data (where the Census record linked to the MADIP spine) excluding NDIS participants (as defined above). Note this population includes people with disability who were not NDIS participants, as well as people without disability.

Age

Age variables have been selected to reflect a person's age during the analytical dataset reference period and therefore differ depending on the analytical dataset.

For more information on the analytical datasets, age and other factors to consider when interpreting results, see the relevant notes at the beginning of each section, along with more detailed information in the Technical Note.

Comparisons across populations

The NDIS largely provides support to people aged under 65 years(1) with permanent and significant disability. 

In comparing NDIS participants to the ‘rest of population’, it is important to note the differing age distributions, especially given the correlation between age and many factors such as health service use and housing circumstances that have been analysed in this publication.

Of the 337,300 NDIS participants as of 31 December 2019 (who linked to the MADIP spine), almost two-thirds (65.5%) were aged under 35 years, compared to 41.0% of the rest of population.

Download
  1. Age as at 31 December 2019 for NDIS participants (based on NDIS data) and for Rest of population 2016 Census age, adjusted by 3 years to reflect age in 2019 and allow for comparability with NDIS age.
  2. Total NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details.
  3. Total population according to the 2016 Census who linked to the MADIP spine (minus those in the NDIS population), see Technical Note for more details.

Almost two-thirds (62.0%) of the 337,300 NDIS participants were male, largely due to the significant number of people among the NDIS population with autism, and the higher prevalence of autism among males(2). In comparison, among the rest of population there were a fairly even number of males and females (48.9% of the rest of population were male).

Comparisons within the NDIS population

Primary disability type

When comparing results within the NDIS population, it is important to understand the population’s profile across primary disability type. While NDIS participants may have one or more disabilities for which they need assistance, their primary disability is the disability that impacts most on a person’s daily life(3).

The most common primary disability types among NDIS participants (in scope of this analysis) were:

  • autism (30.9% of all participants)
  • intellectual disability (20.2%)
  • psychosocial disability (9.1%)

The age profiles differ considerably across primary disability types, with some disability types made up entirely of younger people. This is important to keep in mind when interpreting results.

Download

(a) Total NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details.

(b) Age as at 31 December 2019 (based on NDIS data).

MADIP datasets

The MADIP is a secure data asset combining information on health, education, government payments, income and taxation, employment, and population demographics (including Census) over time.

Analysis in this publication uses linked NDIS data, in conjunction with the following four MADIP datasets to provide a range of high-level insights about NDIS participants’ use of health services and medications, support needs, housing circumstances and sociodemographic characteristics:

  • 2019-20 Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS)
  • 2019-20 Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS)
  • 2016 Census of Population and Housing (Census)
  • 2020 Social Security Related Information (SSRI)

Some comparative analysis for the ‘rest of population’ is also included.

The potential of linked NDIS-MADIP data is far broader than what is included in the following high-level analysis. Interested researchers should visit the ABS website for further details around applying for access to linked NDIS-MADIP data.

Analytical dataset: Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS)

Overview

The Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) lists medical health services subsidised by the Australian Government(4). Information collected in the MBS analytical dataset includes the type (item number) and number of services provided, as well as information on the benefit paid by Medicare for the service.

There are several factors which should be considered when interpreting information presented in this section. Data presented relate to people who used MBS subsidised services only. People seeking assistance in managing or treating health conditions in Australia may have several options available to them. The specific option(s) a person follows may be influenced by a range of factors, such as their diagnosis, the severity of their condition(s), treatment options available as well as personal preference. People may have also obtained other health services from providers not subsidised through the MBS, including (but not limited to) state and territory funded services. MBS subsidised health services are defined in Appendix 1.

The MBS datasets used for the following analysis top-coded number of visits for each service to '20 visits and over'. Therefore, total visit and average visit counts will be an undercount. This should not significantly change the overall story/comparisons across and/or within populations. See Technical Note for more details.

Reference period

MBS subsidised service use in the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020.

Age

Age as at 31 December for NDIS participants (based on NDIS data) and for rest of population 2016 Census age, adjusted by 3 years to reflect age in 2019 and align with NDIS age and data reference period.

For more detailed information on this dataset see the Technical Note.

Overview of MBS subsidised service use

The rest of population has a much older profile than the NDIS population (that is, there are proportionally more people over the age of 65 in the rest of population compared with a younger NDIS population). Given the differing age profiles and the correlation between service use and age, some MBS analysis has been presented for the 0 to 64-year cohort, in addition to analysis for all ages. The intention is for these comparisons to aid interpretation in the way the differing age profiles may influence results.

In 2019-20, of the 337,300 linked NDIS participants of all ages, nearly all (95.6%) accessed an MBS service at least once, compared with 87.1% of the rest of population (when limited to those aged 0 to 64 years, 95.5% of NDIS participants and 86.8% of the rest of population).

The services most likely to be accessed (at least once) by NDIS participants in 2019-20 were:

  • General Practitioner (GP) services (91.1%)
  • Pathology tests (53.3%)
  • Pathology collection (52.7%)
  • Specialists (53.2%)

When compared to the rest of population, the most commonly accessed services were similar for the two populations. While overall a larger proportion of NDIS participants (of all ages) accessed GP services, specialists and GP enhanced primary care services, those in the rest of population were more likely to have used pathology tests and collection services, diagnostic imaging and optometry services.

Download
  1. Based on proportion who used selected MBS subsidised services at least once in the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020.
  2. Total NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details.
  3. Total population according to the 2016 Census who linked to the MADIP spine (minus those in the NDIS population), see Technical Note for more details.
  4. Includes services such as health assessments, medication management reviews, creation and review of treatment plans, and coordination of care for people living with complex health conditions who require multidisciplinary, team-based care from a GP and at least two other providers.

Total and average number of MBS visits

Among NDIS participants (of all ages) who used at least one MBS service in 2019-20, the average number of visits to all MBS services (21.0 visits) was higher than the rest of the population (18.4 visits) (when limited to those aged 0 to 64 years, the average number of visits was 20.5 for NDIS participants and 14.5 for the rest of population).

This was consistent across all age groups. The difference was largest for:

  • those aged 45-54 years where NDIS participants had almost twice the number of average visits to MBS services (33.6 visits) compared with the rest of population (16.9 visits)
  • those aged 35-44 years (average of 29.5 visits for NDIS participants compared with 15.3 visits for the rest of population).

For both populations, the average number of visits to MBS services generally increased with age.

Download
  1. Based on use of MBS subsidised services in the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020.
  2. Total NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details.
  3. Total population according to the 2016 Census who linked to the MADIP spine (minus those in the NDIS population), see Technical Note for more details.

The two most commonly accessed MBS services (GP attendances and pathology tests) were also the most frequently used services. Among NDIS participants (of all ages) in 2019-20:

  • there were almost 2.5 million GP attendances, averaging 8.0 visits per NDIS participant who accessed this service (compared with an average of 6.5 visits for those who used this service in the rest of population)
  • there were almost 1.4 million pathology tests, averaging 7.6 tests per NDIS participant who accessed this service (compared with an average of 6.7 tests for those who used this service in the rest of population).

MBS service use by primary disability type

There was little variation across disability type in terms of overall use of MBS services, with more than 90% of all NDIS participants accessing at least one service in 2019-20, regardless of their primary disability. However, people with some primary disability types were more likely to access specific services compared with others.

Among NDIS participants (of all ages) in 2019-20:

  • those with multiple sclerosis were most likely (of any primary disability type) to have seen a specialist (78.7%), while those with a hearing impairment were least likely to have visited a specialist (42.5%)
  • those with psychosocial disability or stroke were most likely to have accessed GP enhanced primary care (63.2% and 62.5% respectively).

People with psychosocial disability accessed the highest average number of MBS services in 2019-20 (an average of 40.5 visits per person), followed by those with multiple sclerosis (an average of 38.1 visits per person). It is important to take into consideration the different age profiles of primary disability groups when interpreting results (see Comparisons within the NDIS population section).

MBS service use across age

MBS service use generally increased with age among both NDIS participants and the rest of population. However, use of specialists among NDIS participants showed a different pattern.

Specialists

NDIS participants (of all ages) were 1.7 times more likely to attend a specialist at least once (53.2%) than the rest of population (31.7%) (when limited to those aged 0 to 64 years a larger difference was observed, 53.0% of NDIS participants compared with 26.1% of the rest of population). This was particularly the case among young children. In 2019-20:

  • almost two-thirds (63.7%) of NDIS participants aged 0-6 years had seen a specialist at least once, almost 4 times the rate of the rest of population aged 0-6 years (16.7%)
  • over half (58.6%) of NDIS participants aged 7-14 years had seen a specialist at least once, almost 4 times higher than the rest of population aged 7-14 years (15.6%).
Download
  1. Based on proportion who used MBS item number 200 at least once in the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020.
  2. Total NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details.
  3. Total population according to the 2016 Census who linked to the MADIP spine (minus those in the NDIS population), see Technical Note for more details.

Although a higher proportion of young NDIS participants accessed specialist services at least once (compared with the rest of population), the average number of visits to specialists generally increased with age, similar to other services. Of NDIS participants who accessed specialist services in 2019-20:

  • children aged 7-14 years had the lowest average number of specialist visits (2.9 visits per person) followed by children aged 0-6 years (3.1 visits per person)
  • those aged 55-64 years had an average of 5.2 specialist visits per person.
Download
  1. Based on use of MBS item number 200 at least once in the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020.
  2. Total NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details.
  3. Total population according to the 2016 Census who linked to the MADIP spine (minus those in the NDIS population), see Technical Note for more details.

Analytical dataset: Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme

Overview

The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) lists all the medicines available to be dispensed to patients at a government subsidised price. The analytical PBS dataset contains information regarding the type and number of prescriptions people have accessed and the related costs of the prescriptions. PBS subsidised medications included in the following analysis are defined in Appendix 2.

The PBS datasets used for the following analysis top-coded number of scripts for each PBS category to '20 and over'. Therefore, total script and average script counts will be an undercount. This should not significantly change the overall story/comparisons across and/or within populations. See Technical Note for more details.

Reference period

PBS subsidised prescription medications in the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020.

Age

Age as at 31 December for NDIS participants (based on NDIS data) and for Rest of population 2016 Census age, adjusted by 3 years to reflect age in 2019 and align with NDIS age and data reference period.

For more detailed information on this dataset see the Technical Note.

Overview PBS subsidised medicine use

The rest of population has a much older profile than the NDIS population (that is, there are proportionally more people over the age of 65 in the rest of population compared with a younger NDIS population). Given the differing age profiles and the correlation between medicine use and age, some PBS analysis has been presented for the 0 to 64-year cohort, in addition to analysis for all ages. The intention is for these comparisons to aid interpretation in the way the differing age profiles may influence results.

In 2019-20, of the 337,300 NDIS participants (of all ages) 79.7% accessed at least one PBS subsidised medicine, compared with 66.3% of the rest of population (when limited to those aged 0 to 64 years, 79.2% of NDIS participants and 61.7% of the rest of population).

Overall NDIS participants (of all ages) accessed a total of 5.1 million subsidised medicines. Among NDIS participants who accessed at least one PBS medicine in 2019-20, the average number of scripts was 18.9, compared with 14.5 for those in the rest of population (when limited to those aged 0 to 64 years, the average number of scripts was 18.5 for NDIS participants and 9.9 for the rest of population).

PBS medicine use by age

In 2019-20, among NDIS participants:

  • the use of PBS medicines was higher than the rest of population across all age groups
  • the greatest difference was among those aged 7-14 years (70.2% of NDIS participants accessed PBS medicines, compared with 42.1% for the rest of population).

The difference between the two populations in the proportion of people who accessed PBS medicines generally diminished with increasing age.

Download
  1. Based on proportion who used at least one PBS subsidised medicine in the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020.
  2. Total NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details.
  3. Total population according to the 2016 Census who linked to the MADIP spine (minus those in the NDIS population), see Technical Note for more details.

When compared to the rest of population, not only did a greater proportion of NDIS participants access PBS medicines, they also accessed a higher average number of scripts across all age groups. NDIS participants in the age groups from 7 to 44 years had an average number of scripts almost three times higher than those of the same age in the rest of population.

Download
  1. Based on use of PBS subsidised medicines in the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020.
  2. Total NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details.
  3. Total population according to the 2016 Census who linked to the MADIP spine (minus those in the NDIS population), see Technical Note for more details.

PBS medicines accessed

There was some variation in the types of medicines accessed by NDIS participants compared to the rest of population. In 2019-20, of the 337,300 NDIS participants (of all ages), the most common types of PBS medicines by body system accessed (at least once) were:

  • Anti-infectives for systemic use e.g. antibiotics (44.4% compared with 37.0% of the rest of population)
  • Other nervous system medicines e.g. to help quit smoking, and to assist with other nervous system conditions (27.2% compared with 16.5% of the rest of population)
  • Nervous system antidepressants used to alleviate depression (26.4% compared with 13.4% of the rest of population)
  • PBS medicines for the cardiovascular system were accessed by around one-quarter of both NDIS participants (25.0%) and the rest of population (24.5%).

For more information about the PBS body system classification of medicines see the Technical Note.

Download
  1. Based on use of PBS subsidised medicines in the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020.
  2. The term ‘Body System’ is used to describe the body’s anatomy functions and medical conditions that are grouped together, based on World Health Organisation groupings. The Body System is used to classify medicines under the PBS.
  3. Total NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details.
  4. Total population according to the 2016 Census who linked to the MADIP spine (minus those in the NDIS population), see Technical Note for more details.

PBS medicine use by primary disability type

Among NDIS participants (of all ages), people with the following primary disability types were most likely to have accessed at least one PBS medicine in 2019-20:

  • Multiple sclerosis (97.5% of whom accessed at least one PBS medicine in 2019-20)
  • Stroke (96.1%)
  • Psychosocial disability (95.7%)
  • Spinal cord injury (95.5%)

Of those who accessed at least one PBS medicine, those with the following primary disability types had the highest average number of scripts in 2019-20:

  • Stroke (33.6 prescriptions)
  • Psychosocial disability (30.7)
  • Multiple sclerosis (28.4)

It is important to take into consideration the different age profiles of primary disability groups when interpreting results (see Comparisons within the NDIS population section).

Analytical dataset: Census of Population and Housing

Overview

Census data provides a rich snapshot of the nation and helps to inform government, community, and business about the economic, social and cultural make-up of Australia. Of the 337,300 NDIS participants (who linked to the MADIP spine) around 84% had a corresponding 2016 Census record and are therefore in scope of this analysis. There are additional scope considerations depending on the topic being analysed – please refer to the relevant notes in each section. As the variables analysed below can change over time, care should be taken when interpreting results.

Reference period

2016 Census of Population and Housing data.

Age

Age as reported in the 2016 Census (for both NDIS participants and the rest of population).

For more detailed information on this dataset see the Technical Note.

Employment

Disability is generally associated with lower rates of employment and labour force participation(5). Among the 153,600 NDIS participants within the scope of this analysis (living in households/private dwellings) aged 15-64 years:

  • 27.3% were in the labour force, less than half the rate of the rest of population (76.9%)
  • 23.4% were employed, less than one third the rate of the rest of population (71.7%)
  • 4.0% were unemployed, compared to 5.3% of the rest of population.

Volunteering

Of NDIS participants within the scope of this analysis (living in all dwelling types aged 15 years and over), around one in six (15.8%) had volunteered for an organisation or group in the previous 12 months, compared with one in five people (20.3%) of the same age in the rest of population.

Rates of volunteering among NDIS participants varied according to primary disability type:

  • one-quarter (24.4%) of those with visual impairment had volunteered
  • around one in five (21.0%) of those with hearing impairment had volunteered.

Income

NDIS participants generally lived in households with a lower level of equivalised household income.

Among NDIS participants within the scope of this analysis (people of all ages living in households/private dwellings):

  • over half (56.6%) lived in households with an equivalised income under $800 per week, compared with 38.4% of the rest of population
  • 9.2% lived in households with an equivalised income of over $1,500 per week, less than half that of the rest of population (20.5%).
Download
  1. There are economic advantages associated with living with others because household resources, especially housing, can be shared. Equivalised household income adjusts total household income by the application of a modified OECD equivalence scale to facilitate comparison of income levels between households of differing size and composition.
  2. Total NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details
  3. Total population according to the 2016 Census who linked to the MADIP spine (minus those in the NDIS population), see Technical Note for more details.

Household income by age

Results showed some variation in household income across age. The likelihood of living in a household with a low (reported) equivalised weekly income:

  • increased with age for NDIS participants (up to 35 years and then remained relatively stable)
  • decreased with age for the rest of population (up to 54 years).

The disparity between the two populations increased across age (up to 54 years).

Download
  1. Age for both populations taken from Census data, collected on 9 August 2016.
  2. Total NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details
  3. Total population according to the 2016 Census who linked to the MADIP spine (minus those in the NDIS population), see Technical Note for more details.

Household income by primary disability type

Given the range of impacts that different disabilities can have on an individual or carer’s ability to work, certain disabilities were associated with lower household incomes. Of NDIS participants within the scope of this analysis (people of all ages living in households/private dwellings), those with the following primary disability types were more likely than those with other primary disability types to be living in households with an equivalised weekly income under $800:

  • Psychosocial disability (73.4%)
  • Acquired brain injury (63.8%)
  • Intellectual disability (61%).

Housing circumstances

Dwelling type

Of NDIS participants within the scope of this analysis (people of all ages living in all dwelling types) most (94.6%) lived in a private dwelling, with around one in twenty (5.3%) living in non-private dwellings(6) (compared with around 2.6% of the rest of population).

The likelihood of living in a non-private dwelling increased for certain disability types. Of NDIS participants within the scope of this analysis:

  • almost one in seven with psychosocial disability (15.2%) or acquired brain injury (14.7%) lived in non-private dwellings
  • around one in 8 (12.2%) with disability associated with stroke lived in non-private dwellings.

It is important to take into consideration the different age profiles of primary disability groups when interpreting these results (see Comparisons within the NDIS population section).

Download
  1. NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details
  2. Includes dwellings such as hostels for people with disability, accommodation for the retired or aged (not self-contained) such as nursing homes, as well as hospitals, childcare institutions and others.
  3. Refers to the impairment that impacts most on a person’s daily functioning.

 

Tenure type

Linked NDIS-MADIP data showed that NDIS participants were more likely to be living in rental accommodation than the rest of population.

Of NDIS participants within the scope of this analysis (people of all ages living in households/private dwellings):

  • 39.7% were living in a rented home, compared with 28.7% of the rest of population
  • 36.6% were living in a home owned with a mortgage, compared with 41.1% of the rest of population
  • around one in five (19.6%) lived in a home that was owned outright, compared with 26.5% of the rest of population.

In general, the likelihood of living in rental accommodation was higher among those with a low household income and this was particularly pronounced among NDIS participants. Among NDIS participants within the scope of this analysis (people of all ages living in households/private dwellings):

  • almost two-thirds (62.0%) of those in a household with an equivalised weekly income below $400 per week were renting, compared to 45.9% of the rest of population living in a household with an equivalised weekly income below $400 per week
  • almost half (45.8%) of those in a household with an equivalised weekly income between $400-$799 per week were renting, compared to 32.7% of the rest of population with that income.
Download
  1. Total household income adjusted by the application of a modified OECD equivalence scale to facilitate comparison of income levels between households of differing size and composition.
  2. Total NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details
  3. Total population according to the 2016 Census who linked to the MADIP spine (minus those in the NDIS population), see Technical Note for more details.

Tenure type by age

Tenure type also varied across age, in particular the likelihood of living in rental accommodation.

NDIS participants within the scope of this analysis (people of all ages living in households/private dwellings):

  • were more likely to be living in rental accommodation than the rest of population among all age groups (except those aged 15-34 years)
  • those aged 35-44 years were most likely to be living in rental accommodation (45.0%) followed by those aged 45-54 years (44.1%, almost twice as high as the rest of population for this age group, 22.7%).

The disparity between the two populations in the rate of those living in rental accommodation generally increased with age.

Download
  1. Age for both populations taken from Census data, collected on 9 August 2016.
  2. Total NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details
  3. Total population according to the 2016 Census who linked to the MADIP spine (minus those in the NDIS population), see Technical Note for more details.

Housing suitability

Housing suitability(7) is an indicator of whether a private household is living in suitable accommodation for the number of people living there. A home with spare bedrooms suggests the occupants live in relative comfort.

Of NDIS participants within the scope of this analysis (people of all ages living in households/private dwellings):

  • 59.1% were living in a home with spare bedrooms, compared with 66.7% of the rest of population
  • just 7.7% were living in a home where extra bedrooms were needed, compared to 6.7% of the rest of population.
Download
  1. Housing suitability is a measure of housing use based on a comparison of the number of bedrooms in a dwelling with a series of household demographics, such as the number of usual residents, their relationship to each other, their age and sex.
  2. Total NDIS population who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details.
  3. Total population according to the 2016 Census who linked to the MADIP spine (minus those in the NDIS population), see Technical Note for more details.

Analytical dataset: Social Security Related Information (SSRI)

Overview

Social Security Related Information (SSRI) data includes information about Australian government social support pensions and payments. Analysis of these data in conjunction with other data provides insight into a range of socioeconomic issues facing Australians and their families.

It is important to note that a large number of NDIS participants transitioned into the Scheme from December 2019 to December 2020. Analysis of the receipt of social support payments included here reflects NDIS participants who were active in the Scheme at 31 December 2019 and who linked to the MADIP spine (approximately 337,300 out of 339,000). If the same data were to be analysed but for NDIS participants in the Scheme as at 31 December 2020, results may differ.

Reference period

January – December 2020 Social Security Related Information.

Age

Age as at 31 December for NDIS participants (based on NDIS data).

For more detailed information on this dataset see the Technical Note.

People with disability may be eligible for financial support, with varying eligibility requirements for different social support payments. The Disability Support Pension (DSP)(8) is a payment for people with permanent physical, intellectual or psychological disability that stops them working and is limited to people aged 16 years and over. Children under 16 with disability may be eligible for other financial supports paid to their parents/carers.

The following analysis is limited to NDIS participants who were in the Scheme at 31 December 2019 (and who linked to the MADIP spine) and does not include information about social support payments received by parents/carers of people with disability. Therefore, it is likely this analysis does not represent the full picture of income supports provided to NDIS participants, particularly for children under 16 years and for the primary disability groups predominantly made-up of younger people.

Among NDIS participants of all ages who were in the Scheme at 31 December 2019 (and who linked to the MADIP spine), half (50.3%) received some form of social support payment in 2020, comprising:

  • Disability Support Pension (45.3%) - these people may or may not have also received other support payments
  • Other support payment (5.0%)

Given DSP eligibility, the proportion of NDIS participants who received DSP increased to 75.5% when limiting to those aged 16 years and over.

Across primary disability types, the proportion who received a social security payment varied. Of NDIS participants (of all ages) who were in the Scheme at 31 December (and who linked to the MADIP spine), those most likely to be receiving a social security related support payment were:

  • people with psychosocial disabilities (94.6%)
  • people with acquired brain injury (80.6%)
  • people with disabilities associated with stroke (80.9%)
Download

(a) NDIS participants in the Scheme at 31 December 2019 who linked to the MADIP spine, see Technical Note for more details.

(b) Social security related payments include a range of payments supporting people in different circumstances, including people with disability, families, people experiencing unemployment, people experiencing crises and others.

(c) Refers to the impairment that impacts most on a person’s daily functioning, as recorded for NDIS participants.

(d) People receiving Disability Support Pension may or may not be receiving other social security related payments.

(e) ‘Other support payment only’ excludes all people receiving the Disability Support Pension. Includes ABSTUDY, Age pension, AUSTUDY, Carer payment, Carer allowance, Farm household allowance, Family tax benefit parts A and B, Job seeker payment, Low income card, Newstart allowance, Parental leave pay, Parenting payment, Partner allowance, Rent assistance, Senior health card, Sickness allowance, Special benefit, Wife pension, Widow allowance, Youth allowance, and other benefit.

Technical note

Technical note describes the data sources, scope, preparation, and method used to link 2019 National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) administrative data to the Multi-Agency Integration Project (MADIP).

NDIS data was linked to the MADIP spine and then analysed, in conjunction with other MADIP datasets, to provide insights into the sociodemographic characteristics, and use of health services, medicines and receipt of social security payments by NDIS participants.

The following technical information is relevant only to the results published in Characteristics of NDIS participants – analysis of linked data, 2019, and may not necessarily be relevant for other linkages involving NDIS data.

Data

The data for this publication were produced using the following data sources:

National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) administrative data

Administrative data for active participants in the NDIS as at 31 December 2019, including demographic and NDIS plan characteristics. The National Disability Insurance Agency collect information about participants in order to administer the Scheme and disseminate statistics for research and evaluation(9). Data for this linkage was provided by the NDIA to the ABS under a Public Interest Certificate.

MADIP person linkage spine

Linking infrastructure that serves as a base dataset representing the population ever resident in Australia between 2006 and 2020.

2016 ABS Census of Population and Housing

The 2016 Census measured the number and key characteristics of people who were in Australia on Census night, 9 August 2016.

Medicare Benefits Schedule administrative data

Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) administrative data for the 2019-20 financial year.

Department of Human Services collects data on the activity of all persons making claims through the MBS and provides this information to the Department of Health. Information collected includes the type of service provided (MBS item number) and the benefit paid by Medicare for the service. The item numbers and benefits paid by Medicare are based on the MBS which is a listing of the Medicare services subsidised by the Australian Government. Analysis in this publication includes MBS subsidised services, grouped by Broad Type of Service (see Appendix).

Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme administrative data

Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) data for the 2019-20 financial year.

Department of Human Services provides data on prescriptions funded through the PBS to the Department of Health. The PBS lists all medicines available to be dispensed to patients at a Government-subsidised price. Analysis in this publication includes PBS subsidised mental health-related medications, grouped by PBS Body System (see Appendix).

Social Security and Related Information administrative data

Social Security and Related Information administrative data for the 2020 calendar year.

Australia collects information on the benefits claimed through Centrelink and provides this to the Department of Social Services for administration, research and evaluation purposes. Information collected includes type and amount of benefit(s) received.

Scope

The scope of the data is restricted to:

‘NDIS population’: active NDIS participants as at 31 December 2019 where the NDIS record linked to the MADIP spine.

‘Rest of population’: people who responded to the 2016 Census of Population and Housing where the Census record linked to the MADIP spine.

The following exclusions apply where additional administrative data is used:

Medicare Benefits Schedule

  • Services that qualify for a benefit under the Department of Veterans' Affairs National Treatment Account.
  • Persons who accessed services only through programs that do not use the Medicare processing system, for example, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Programs.

Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme

  • The Repatriation Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, subsidised by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs.
  • Persons who were supplied medications through programs not subsidised by the PBS;
  • Persons accessing private prescription drugs, over the counter drugs, and drugs that cost less than the co-payment.

Social Security and Related Information

  • Persons who were indirect beneficiaries, i.e. if a parent received a benefit on behalf of their child, the parent will be included in the dataset while the child will not.

NDIS data preparation

The NDIS variables used for linking were name, geographies, date of birth and sex or gender.

Name

NDIS names were cleaned, standardised and anonymised.

Names were cleaned by removing nonsense values, removing special characters and titles. The cleaned names were then standardised by converting common nicknames, abbreviations, misspellings or variations on a first name to their 'origin name'. Any first name that could not be standardised was retained in its original form. Names were then anonymised.

Geography

The ABS Address Register provides a comprehensive list of all physical addresses in Australia and includes an Address Register ID (ARID) for each physical address. An anonymised version of ARID is used in data linkage projects. Addresses were geocoded to ARID, Mesh block, SA1, SA2, and SA4, according to the ASGS 2016 classification(10).

Date of Birth

Full date of birth, as well as day and year of birth were used in the NDIS linkage.

NDIS linkage methodology

Deterministic Example

NDIS linkage was completed using deterministic linking. Deterministic linkage involves locating record pairs across the two datasets that match exactly or closely (according to pre-defined rules) on common variables. The deterministic linkage employed was designed using a three-stage approach. The matching rules and criteria were gradually broadened with each stage to tolerate greater differences in a field or expanding the geographic area in which a match can occur.

NDIS Linkage Results

A total of 337,347 links were achieved in the NDIS to MADIP spine linkage, resulting in a total NDIS linkage rate of 99.52%.

Linkage rates by sex, age and state are presented in Table 1. Very High linkage rates were achieved across all demographics, with slightly lower rates for persons living in the Northern Territory.

Download
Table 1b: 2019 NDIS to Spine linkage rates by sex(a)
Table 1a: 2019 NDIS to Spine linkage rates by sex(a)
Total recordsLinked recordsLinkage rate (%)
Sex(a)
Male210,150209,30999.60
Female125,046124,51299.57
Total338,976337,34799.52

(a)  3,780 persons missing Sex

Download
Table 1b: 2019 NDIS to Spine linkage rates by age
Total recordsLinked recordsLinkage rate (%)
Under 15 years135,818135,04899.43
15-2454,72654,54099.66
25-3431,35831,22599.58
35-4429,48329,34899.54
45-5436,92536,73399.48
55-6441,65641,48199.58
65-749,0108,97299.58
Total338,976337,34799.52
Download
Table 1c: 2019 NDIS to Spine linkage rates by state(a)
Total recordsLinked recordsLinkage rate (%)
NSW126,281125,65499.50
VIC85,46985,12499.60
QLD58,99858,79899.66
SA27,89027,70999.35
WA23,74323,63599.55
TAS7,0977,05399.38
NT2,6372,55696.93
ACT6,8516,80899.37
Total(b)338,976337,34799.52

(a) Total includes Other Territories

(b) To allocate a single state per person when more than one state was recorded, the minimum value was used, where 1=NSW, 2=Vic, 3=Qld, 4=SA, 5=WA, 6=Tas, 7=NT, 8=ACT, 9=Other Territories (includes Jervis Bay Territory, Territory of Christmas Island, Territory of Cocos (Keeling Isolands), and Territory of Norfolk Island)

MADIP linkage spine and datasets

Information about the MADIP linkage spine and MADIP datasets can be found on the ABS Multi-Agency Data Integration Project (MADIP) website.

Table 2 shows the number of NDIS records (of the 337,347 which linked to the MADIP spine) where a corresponding record in the specified analytical dataset was available.

There are two reasons why NDIS records may not have a corresponding record in an analytical dataset:

  • They did not have a record in the relevant dataset (e.g. Medicare Benefits Schedule – they did not use any MBS subsidised services in the specified reference period); or
  • Their record in that specific dataset (e.g. MBS) did not link to the MADIP spine.

 

Download
Table 2: NDIS participants, corresponding records in other MADIP datasets
Total NDIS participants with a record% of all linked NDIS participants (i.e. of the 337,347)
2016 Census282,60083.80%
2019-20 Medicare Benefits Schedule336,69799.80%
2019-20 Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme331,06998.10%
2020 Social Security Related Information180,72953.60%

Glossary

Glossary

Age

Age has been adjusted to better reflect a person’s age during the analytical data reference period. For analysis using 2016 Census data, a person's age is as of August 2016; for MBS, PBS and SSRI data, the following ages have been used to more closely align with the 2019-20 (MBS and PBS) and 2020 (SSRI) reference periods:

  • NDIS participants - age as at 31 Dec 2019 (based on NDIS data)
  • Rest of population - age at 2016 Census (i.e. 9 August 2016) adjusted by 3 years to reflect age in 2019 and allow for comparability across age with NDIS participants.
NDIS participants

NDIS participants are people with an active NDIS plan as at 31 December 2019, whose record linked with the MADIP spine.

Disability

A physical, intellectual, cognitive, neurological, visual, hearing, or psycho-social impairment that:

  • is (or is likely to be) permanent
  • substantially reduces ‘functional capacity’ in one or more of the following areas: mobility, communication, social interaction, self-management, learning and self-care
  • restricts ability to participate in work/study, engage with peers and/or interact with the wider community (i.e. has a clear social and/or economic impact)

See the NDIS website for more information.

Primary disability

Primary disability refers to the impairment that impacts most on a person’s daily functioning.

Rest of population

People with a Census record which linked with the MADIP spine, excluding people with a linked NDIS record.

Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS)

The Medicare Benefits Schedule (the MBS) is a list of the medical services for which the Australian Government will pay a Medicare rebate, to pro-vide patients with financial assistance towards the costs of their medical services.

Multi-Agency Data Integration Project (MADIP

MADIP is a secure data asset combining information on health, education, government payments, income and taxation, employment, and population demographics (including the Census) over time.

It provides whole-of-life insights about various population groups in Austral-ia, such as the interactions between their characteristics, use of services like healthcare and education, and outcomes like improved health and employment.

MADIP Linkage Spine

The Person Linkage Spine links all MADIP datasets to the Spine once and then datasets are combined via the Spine as needed for multiple projects. The Spine enables more efficient and higher quality linkage. By keeping the spine separate from the main body of the data, we also improve privacy and security.

The spine is based on the combined population from three core datasets:

  • Medicare Consumer Directory (MCD) - Services Australia
  • DOMINO Centrelink Administrative Data (DOMINO CAD) - Department of Social Services
  • Personal Income Tax (PIT) - Australian Taxation Office

The spine aims to cover all people who were resident in Australia at any point during January 2006 to June 2020.

Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS)

The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) is an Australian Government program that subsidises medicines, to provide Australians with financial assistance towards the cost of their treatments.

Social Support and Related Information (SSRI)

Information about people who have interacted with the Australian Government social security system.

Appendix

Appendix 1: MBS items

Broad type of service (11)

General Practitioner attendances

1-4, 13-14, 19-20, 23-26, 33, 35-40, 43-44, 47-51, 193, 195, 197, 199, 585, 594-597, 599, 601-603, 2497-2501, 2503-2504, 2506-2507, 2509, 2517-2518, 2521-2522, 2525-2526, 2546-2547, 2552-2553, 2558-2559, 2574-2575, 2577-2578, 5000, 5003, 5007, 5010, 5020, 5023, 5026, 5028, 5040, 5043, 5046, 5049, 5060, 5063-5064, 5067, 10660, 90001, 90005-90051, 90250-90253, 90264, 90271-90274, 90279-90280, 91721-91790, 91795, 91800-91802, 91809-91811, 91890-91891, 92146-92149, 92154-92157, 92170, 92176, 92182-92184, 92194-92196, 92210, 92216, 92715, 92718, 92721, 92724, 92731, 92734, 92737, 92740, 93624-93625, 93634-93635, 93644-93645, 93653-93654

Specialist attendances

85, 88, 94, 99-100, 102-152, 154-159, 288-289, 291-293, 296-297, 299-338, 342-353, 355-359, 361, 364, 366-367, 369-370, 384-389, 410-417, 501-503, 507, 511, 515, 519-520, 530, 532, 534, 536, 801, 803, 805, 807-809, 811, 813, 815, 820, 822-823, 825-826, 828, 830, 832, 834-835, 837-838, 851-852, 855, 857-858, 861, 864, 866, 871-872, 880, 887-890, 893, 2799, 2801, 2806, 2814, 2820, 2824, 2832, 2840, 2946-2949, 2954, 2958, 2972-2978, 2984-3003, 3005, 3010, 3014-3015, 3018, 3023, 3028-3032, 3040, 3044, 3051-3055, 3062, 3069, 3074-3078, 3083, 3088, 3093, 5001, 5004, 5011-5014, 5016-5017, 5019, 5039, 5041, 5906-5912, 6004, 6007-6009, 6011-6016, 6018-6019, 6023-6026, 6028-6029, 6031-6032, 6034-6035, 6037-6038, 6042, 6051-6052, 6057-6060, 6062-6065, 6067-6068, 6071-6075, 6080-6082, 6084, 10801-10816, 17603-17690, 90260-90263, 90266-90269, 90300, 91822-91841, 92140-92145, 92162-92167, 92172-92173, 92178-92179, 92422-92712

Pathology tests

1001-2094, 2096-2099, 2101-2120, 2123-2124, 2127-2136, 2139-2142, 2145-2146, 2148-2149, 2151-2178, 2181-2192, 2201-2219, 2221-2399, 65001-73844, 74990-74991

Pathology collection

73899-73940, 74992-74999

General Practitioner enhanced primary care

177, 224-233, 235-240, 243-245, 249, 272, 276-277, 279, 281-283, 285-287, 371-372, 699-710, 712-732, 734-736, 738-740, 742-744, 746-747, 749-750, 757-759, 762, 765, 768, 771, 773, 775, 778-779, 900, 903, 941-942, 2700-2702, 2710, 2712-2713, 2715, 2717, 2719, 6087, 91283-91372, 91820-91821, 91844-91845, 92004-92135, 93291-93292, 93306-93311, 93400-93479

Diagnostic imaging

791, 793-794, 910-911, 913, 990-993, 995, 999, 2400-2460, 2502, 2505, 2508, 2512-2516, 2520, 2524, 2528-2545, 2548-2551, 2554-2557, 2560-2573, 2576, 2579-2597, 2599, 2601, 2604, 2607-2609, 2611, 2614, 2617, 2621, 2625-2630, 2634, 2638-2657, 2665, 2672, 2676, 2678-2699, 2703, 2706, 2709, 2711, 2714, 2716, 2718, 2720, 2722, 2724, 2726, 2728, 2730, 2732, 2734, 2736-2798, 2800, 2802-2805, 2807-2813, 2815-2819, 2823, 2825-2831, 2833-2839, 2841-2859, 2960-2971, 2980-2981, 5861, 8712-8713, 8716-8717, 8720-8721, 8723-8724, 8727-8849, 8851-8874, 9066, 9341-9344, 55000-55054, 55056-64991

Other Allied health

10950-10977, 80000-82035, 82300-87777, 90003-90004, 91000-91176, 91181-91188, 93000-93137, 93284-93286, 93312-93386, 93501-93620

Optometry

180, 182, 184, 186, 10900-10948

Operations

924, 3004, 3006, 3012, 3016, 3022, 3027, 3033-3039, 3041, 3046-3050, 3058, 3063, 3073, 3082, 3087, 3092, 3098-3101, 3104-3113, 3116, 3120-3124, 3130, 3135-3142, 3148-3173, 3178-3183, 3194-3226, 3233-3237, 3247-3253, 3261-3265, 3271-3281, 3289, 3295-3330, 3332-3384, 3391, 3399, 3404-3425, 3431-3455, 3459, 3465, 3468-3472, 3477-3480, 3495-3496, 3505, 3509-3516, 3526-3988, 4012-4838, 4844-4860, 4864-4999, 5002, 5006, 5009, 5015, 5018, 5024, 5029, 5034, 5038, 5045, 5048, 5050-5059, 5062, 5066, 5068-5196, 5201, 5205, 5210-5217, 5229-5237, 5241-5242, 5245, 5254, 5264, 5268-5270, 5277-5280, 5284, 5288, 5292-5855, 5864-5905, 5916-6001, 6005-6006, 6010, 6017, 6022, 6027, 6030, 6033, 6036, 6039-6041, 6044-6050, 6053-6056, 6061, 6066, 6069-6070, 6077-6079, 6083, 6085-6086, 6089-6918, 6922-7126, 7129-7133, 7135-7143, 7147-7397, 7410-7483, 7505-7719, 7721-7722, 7725, 7727-7728, 7739-7743, 7749, 7764-7766, 7774-7803, 7808-7809, 7815-7817, 7821-7823, 7828, 7834, 7839, 7844-7847, 7853-7886, 7898-7902, 7911-8003, 8009-8173, 8179-8458, 8462, 8466-8467, 8470-8478, 8480-8481, 8483-8504, 8508-8512, 8515-8519, 8521-8557, 8560, 8564, 8568-8570, 8574, 8578, 8582-8636, 8640, 8644, 8648, 8652, 8655-8658, 8660, 8662, 8664, 8666, 8668, 8670, 8672, 8674-8699, 9401-9409, 9415-9435, 9438, 9441-9449, 9458, 9476-9478, 30000-30524, 30526-30632, 30634-41868, 41870-42824, 42833-51171

Other (non-referred attendances)

5-12, 15-18, 21-22, 27-32, 34, 41-42, 45-46, 52-84, 86-87, 89-93, 95-98, 101, 160-173, 179, 181, 183, 185, 187-189, 191, 202-203, 206, 212, 214-215, 218-223, 251-257, 259-266, 268-271, 444-449, 588-591, 598, 600, 696-698, 733, 737, 741, 745, 761, 763, 766, 769, 772, 776, 788-789, 792, 812, 827, 829, 867-869, 873, 876, 881, 885, 891-892, 894, 896, 898-899, 901, 905-906, 980, 996-998, 2095, 2100, 2121-2122, 2125-2126, 2137-2138, 2143-2144, 2147, 2150, 2179-2180, 2193-2199, 2220, 2461-2483, 2598, 2600, 2603, 2606, 2610, 2613, 2616, 2620, 2622-2624, 2631-2633, 2635, 2664, 2666-2668, 2673-2675, 2677, 2704-2705, 2707-2708, 2721, 2723, 2725, 2727, 2729, 2731, 2733, 2735, 4001, 5021-5022, 5027, 5030-5033, 5035-5036, 5042, 5044, 5200, 5203, 5207-5208, 5220-5228, 5240, 5243, 5247-5248, 5260-5263, 5265-5267, 10661, 17600, 90002, 90092-90212, 90254-90257, 90265, 90275-90278, 90281-90282, 91792-91794, 91797-91799, 91803-91808, 91812-91819, 91842-91843, 91892-91893, 92136-92139, 92150-92153, 92158-92161, 92171, 92177, 92186-92188, 92198-92200, 92211, 92217, 92716-92717, 92719-92720, 92722-92723, 92725-92726, 92732-92733, 92735-92736, 92738-92739, 92741-92742, 93287-93288, 93300-93305, 93626-93627, 93636-93637, 93646-93647, 93655-93656

Practice nurse

711, 10983-10984, 10986-10989, 10993-10999, 93200-93203

Other MBS services

190, 192, 194, 196, 198, 200-201, 204-205, 207-211, 213, 216-217, 234, 241-242, 246-248, 250, 258, 267, 273-275, 278, 280, 284, 290, 295, 298, 354, 360, 362-363, 365, 368, 383, 9011, 15999, 16399-16636, 91850-91858, 401-409, 443, 450-500, 505-506, 509-510, 513-514, 517-518, 521-529, 531, 533, 535, 537-577, 748, 751-756, 760, 764, 767, 787, 790, 9021-9042, 13006-13009, 17500-17506, 17701-18298, 20100-25205, 2951-2953, 2955-2957, 51300-51318, 2861-2945, 8850, 8875-8886, 9381-9392, 15000-15900, 16000-16018, 153, 340, 770, 774, 777, 780-786, 795-800, 802, 804, 806, 810, 814, 816-819, 821, 824, 831, 833, 836, 839-850, 853-854, 856, 859-860, 862-863, 865, 870, 874-875, 877-879, 882-884, 886, 895, 897, 902, 904, 907-909, 912, 915-923, 925-940, 944-979, 981-989, 994, 3059, 3068, 3095, 3103, 3114, 3117, 3128, 3134, 3147, 3175, 3187, 3229-3230, 3245, 3258, 3268, 3284, 3290, 3331, 3386, 3393, 3400, 3427, 3456, 3462, 3466, 3475, 3483, 3500, 3507, 3521, 4003, 4841, 4862, 5249, 5259, 5274, 5282, 5286, 5291, 6920, 7128, 7134, 7146, 7402, 7485, 7720, 7723-7724, 7726, 7729-7731, 7745, 7753, 7770, 7804, 7812, 7818, 7824, 7831, 7836, 7841, 7849, 7888, 7907, 8006, 8175, 8460, 8464, 8468, 8479, 8482, 8506, 8514, 8520, 8558, 8562, 8566, 8572, 8576, 8580, 8638, 8642, 8646, 8650, 8654, 8659, 8661, 8663, 8665, 8667, 8669, 8671, 8673, 8700-8711, 8714-8715, 8718-8719, 8722, 8725-8726, 8901-8990, 9061-9065, 9067, 9410-9414, 9436-9437, 9439, 9450-9457, 9459-9475, 10981-10982, 10985, 10990-10992, 11000-13003, 13012-14288, 18350-18379, 30525, 30633, 41869, 42827-42830, 51700-54004, 55055, 75000-75854, 82100-82225, 91178-91180, 91189-91222, 88000, 88011-88943

Appendix 2: PBS items

PBS body system(12)

Alimentary tract and metabolism

A01 - Stomatological preparations

A02 - Drugs for acid related disorders

A03 - Drugs for functional gastrointestinal disorders

A04 - Antiemetics and antinauseants

A05 - Bile and liver therapy

A06 - Drugs for constipation

A07 - Antidiarrheals, intestinal antiinflammatory/antiinfective agents

A08 - Antiobesity preparations, excl. diet products

A09 - Digestives, incl. enzymes

A10 - Drugs used in diabetes

A11 - Vitamins

A12 - Mineral supplements

A16 - Other alimentary tract and metabolism products

Blood and blood forming organs

B01 - Antithrombotic agents

B02 - Antihemorrhagics

B03 - Antianemic preparations

B05 - Blood substitutes and perfusion solutions

B06 - Other haematological agents

Cardiovascular system

C01 - Cardiac therapy

C02 - Antihypertensives

C03 - Diuretics

C04 - Peripheral vasodilators

C05 - Vasoprotectives

C07 - Beta blocking agents

C08 - Calcium channel blockers

C09 - Agents acting on the renin-angiotensin system

C10 - Lipid modifying agents

Dermatologicals

D01 - Antifungals for dermatological use

D02 - Emollients and protectives

D04 - Antipruritics, incl. antihistamines, anaesthetics, etc.

D05 - Antipsoriatics

D06 - Antibiotics and chemotherapeutics for dermatological use

D07 - Corticosteroids, dermatological preparations

D08 - Antiseptics and disinfectants

D10 - Anti-acne preparations

D11 - Other dermatological preparations

Genito urinary system and sex hormones

G01 - Gynecological anti-infectives and antiseptics

G02 - Other gynaecological

G03 - Sex hormones and modulators of the genital system

G04 – Urologicals

Systemic hormonal preparations, excluding sex hormones and insulins

H01 - Pituitary and hypothalamic hormones and analogues

H02 - Corticosteroids for systemic use

H03 - Thyroid therapy

H04 - Pancreatic hormones

H05 - Calcium homeostasis

Anti-infectives for systemic use

J01 - Antibacterials for systemic use

J02 - Antimycotics for systemic use

J04 - Antimycobacterials

J05 - Antivirals for systemic use

J07 – Vaccines

Musculo-skeletal system

M01 - Antiinflammatory and antirheumatic products

M02 - Topical products for joint and muscular pain

M03 - Muscle relaxants

M04 - Antigout preparations

M05 - Drugs for treatment of bone diseases

M09 - Other drugs for disorders of the musculo-skeletal system

Nervous system

N01 – Anaesthetics

N02 - Analgesics

N03 - Antiepileptics

N04 - Anti-Parkinson drugs

N05 - Psycholeptics

N06 - Psychoanaleptics

N07 - Other nervous system drugs

Respiratory system

R01 - Nasal preparations

R03 - Drugs for obstructive airway diseases

R05 - Cough and cold preparations

R06 - Antihistamines for systemic use

R07 - Other respiratory system products

Sensory organs

S01 - Ophthalmologicals

S02 - Otologicals

S03 - Ophthalmological and otological preparations

Other, including:

Antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents

L01 - Antineoplastic agents

L02 - Endocrine therapy

L03 - Immunostimulants

L04 – Immunosuppressants

Antiparasitic products, insecticides and repellents

P01 - Antiprotozoals

P02 - Anthelmintics

P03 - Ectoparasiticides, incl. scabicides, insecticides and repellents

Various

V01 - Allergens

V03 - All other therapeutic products

V04 - Diagnostic agents

V06 - General nutrients

V07 - All other non-therapeutic products

Endnotes

Endnotes

  1. People who apply to access the NDIS before they turn 65 and who are found eligible can remain in the NDIS beyond age 65. For more information see the NDIS website
  2. ABS ‘Autism in Australia’, Disability, Ageing and Carers Australia: Summary of Findings, 2018,  http://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/health/disability/disability-ageing-and-carers-australia-summary-findings/2018#autism-in-australia, accessed 23 August 2021.
  3. NDIS, 'What is considered good evidence of disability?', www.ndis.gov.au/applying-access-ndis/how-apply/information-support-your-request/providing-evidence-your-disability, accessed 16 September 2021.
  4. Commonwealth Department of Health, 'The Australian health system', https://www.health.gov.au/about-us/the-australian-health-system#medicare-the-foundation-of-our-health-system, accessed 16 September 2021.
  5. ABS Disability, Ageing and Carers, Australia, 2018: Summary of Findings: https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/health/disability/disability-ageing-and-carers-australia-summary-findings/2018, accessed 16 September 2021.
  6. Non-private dwellings are establishments which provide communal or transitory type accommodation and include hostels for people with disability, accommodation for the retired or aged (not self-contained) such as nursing homes, hospitals, childcare institutions and others. For more information see the ABS website.
  7. For more information about housing suitability, see the ABS website.
  8. Services Australia, 'Who can get it', http://servicesaustralia.gov.au/individuals/services/centrelink/disability-support-pension/who-can-get-it, accessed 16 September 2021.
  9. NDIS, 'Research and evaluation', https://www.ndis.gov.au/community/research-and-evaluation, accessed 16 September 2021.
  10. ABS, 1270.0.55.001 - Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS): Volume 1 - Main Structure and Greater Capital City Statistical Areas, July 2016, https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/1270.0.55.001, accessed 21 September 2021
  11. Services Australia, 'Mapping of Medicare items to Broad Type of Service', http://medicarestatistics.humanservices.gov.au/statistics/do.jsp?_PROGRAM=/statistics/std_btos_map&start_dt=0&end_dt=0, accessed 16 September 2021.
  12. Commonwealth Department of Health, The PBS, https://www.pbs.gov.au/browse/body-system?depth=2&codes, accessed 16 September 2021.

Data downloads

Characteristics of National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participants: analysis of linked data