4530.0 - Crime Victimisation, Australia, 2018-19 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 18/02/2020   
   Page tools: Print Print Page Print all pages in this productPrint All RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product

Victims of break-in and attempted break-in

The statistics discussed throughout the commentary refer to incidents of break-in and attempted break-in that occurred in the 12 months prior to interview for the 2018-19 reference period.

Break-in

An estimated 2.4% of Australian households (231,000) experienced a break-in, which was similar to the rate in 2017-18 (2.5%). Of these, the majority experienced a single incident (81% or 187,900).

Households in an area in the lowest quintile (most disadvantage) of the Index of Relative Socio-Economic Advantage and Disadvantage were more likely to experience a break-in compared with households in the highest quintile (3.3% compared with 2.2%).

Police reporting of the most recent incident

An estimated 77% of households (178,400) that experienced a break-in had the most recent incident reported to police.

Common reasons given for not reporting the most recent incident to police:

  • too trivial or unimportant (8.5% or 19,600); and
  • nothing the police could do or would be willing to do (8.1% or 18,800).

Other characteristics of the most recent incident

During the most recent incident of break-in:
  • half of households had property damaged (49% or 113,600);
  • 10% of households had someone confront the perpetrator (23,400); and
  • 73% of households had something stolen (167,500).

Common types of property stolen in the most recent incident of break-in included:
  • personal items, including handbag, jewellery, clothing (26% or 59,900);
  • tools (19% or 44,500); and
  • money, purse or wallet (18% or 40,900).

Attempted break-in

An estimated 1.9% of Australian households (181,900) experienced an attempted break-in, a decrease from 2.2% in 2017-18. Of these, 77% experienced a single incident (139,700).

Households in an area in the lowest quintile (most disadvantage) of the Index of Relative Socio-Economic Advantage and Disadvantage were more likely to experience an attempted break-in compared with households in the highest quintile (2.9% compared with 1.3%).

Common evidence of attempted break-in included damage to or tampering with doors or windows (47% or 85,500) and seeing or hearing someone trying to break-in (21% or 37,900).

Police reporting of the most recent incident

An estimated 44% of households that experienced an attempted break-in (80,100) reported the most recent incident to police.

Common reasons given for not reporting to police were thinking it was too trivial or unimportant (24% or 43,900) and thinking there was nothing the police could do (18% or 33,000).