5232.0 - Australian National Accounts: Finance and Wealth, Mar 2020 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 25/06/2020   
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Credit market summary

Non-financial domestic sectors


Credit market outstandings at end
Demand for credit during
Other changes during
Credit market outstandings at end
Dec Qtr 2019
Mar Qtr 2020
Mar Qtr 2020
Mar Qtr 2020
$b
$b
$b
$b

Non-financial corporations
Investment funds
467.3
0.1
-58.9
408.6
Other private
3 727.2
41.0
-316.0
3 452.2
Public
137.0
5.1
-
142.0
General government
National
647.9
20.2
21.4
689.5
State and local
183.5
18.2
0.1
201.8
Households
2 363.1
1.5
13.8
2 398.5
Total
7 546.0
86.1
-339.5
7 292.6

- nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)


Demand for credit

Demand for credit ($86.1b) was the highest since September quarter 2018, driven by other private non-financial corporations ($41.0b) and general government ($38.4b), while households' demand for credit ($1.5b) continued to be subdued.

Graph 1. Demand for credit
Graph 1 shows Demand for credit


Loan borrowings ($43.7b) by other private non-financial corporations (private trading corporations) were the highest on record in March quarter 2020. Net maturities of corporate bonds ($8.7b), predominantly with the rest of the world, were the highest since March quarter 2017, as companies let existing bonds mature this quarter and issued less due to low investor demand and widening spreads in yields. Equity raising ($5.9b) was the second lowest since December quarter 2012, with equity placements subdued this quarter.

Net bond issuances of $14.5b drove national general government's demand for credit ($20.2b). The RBA increased their holdings of Commonwealth government bonds by a record $42.2b, reflecting the central bank's monetary stimulus measures announced in March in response to COVID-19. State and local general government's demand for credit ($18.2b) was also the highest on record, due to increased funding requirements for bushfire recovery and COVID-19 support packages. This is consistent with strong bond issuance by central borrowing authorities this quarter.

Households' restrained demand for loans continued this quarter ($2.0b). Long term loan borrowing ($7.7b) was the second weakest since September quarter 2012, while the fall in short term loan borrowing (-$5.6b) was the strongest on record.

Graph 2. Annualised demand for credit by sector
Graph 2 shows Annualised demand for credit by sector


Credit market outstanding

Despite the strong increase in demand for credit during the quarter, significant valuation decreases caused credit market outstanding to fall 3.4% (-$253.4b), the largest decrease on record. The fall was driven entirely by valuation losses on shares and other equity of other private non-financial corporations (-$340.7b) and private non-financial investment funds (-$60.9b), reflecting significant falls on the stock market during the quarter, largely in reaction to the evolving and anticipated economic impacts of COVID-19.

Graph 3. Changes in credit market outstanding
Graph 3 shows Credit market outstanding