4316.0 - Apparent Consumption of Selected Foodstuffs, Australia, 2018-19 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 26/06/2020  First Issue
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Dietary energy

Total dietary energy from food and non-alcoholic beverage sales was 8,770 kJ per capita per day. The leading Major food groups contributing to total daily dietary energy included:

  • Cereals and cereal products (e.g. rice, bread, pasta, breakfast cereal) (1,634 kJ or 18.6%)
  • Milk products (1,248 kJ or 14.2%)
  • Meat and poultry products (1,152 kJ or 13.1%)
  • Cereal based products (e.g. biscuits, cakes, pastries) (885 kJ or 10.1%)
  • Fats and oils (722 kJ or 8.2%).


Contribution to dietary energy, leading Major food groups

Contribution to dietary energy, leading Major food groups
Source: Apparent Consumption of Selected Foodstuffs, Australia, 2018–19.


By Sub-major food groups the leading contributors to dietary energy were:
  • Regular breads and bread rolls (586 kJ or 6.7%)
  • Dairy milk (508 kJ or 5.8%)
  • Flours, rice and other grains (461 kJ or 5.3%)
  • Beef, lamb and pork (396 kJ or 4.5%)
  • Plant oils (388 kJ or 4.4%).


Contribution to dietary energy, leading Sub-major food groups

Contribution to dietary energy, leading Sub-major food groups
Source: Apparent Consumption of Selected Foodstuffs, Australia, 2018–19.


Macronutrient contribution to dietary energy

Dietary energy from foods is provided by the macronutrient constituents which include carbohydrate, protein, fat, dietary fibre and alcohol.

The relative contribution of the macronutrients to available dietary energy comprised:
  • Carbohydrate (43.8%)
  • Total Fat (38.8%)
  • Protein (15.5%)
  • Dietary fibre (1.9%)
  • Alcohol (0%) (Alcoholic beverages are not in scope for this data. See paragraph 14 of Explanatory Notes).

An imbalance among the relative proportions of the macronutrients is considered a risk factor for chronic disease and is assessed against recommendations known as Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges (AMDR). Compared with the AMDRs, the proportion of energy from total fat was almost four percentage points higher than the upper limit (38.8% compared with the 35% maximum), while energy from carbohydrate was just below the lower limit (43.8% compared with the 45% minimum). The proportion of energy from protein was within the AMDR, but at the lower end of the range (15.5% compared with the 15% minimum).


Table 1: Energy from macronutrients and Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges(a)


MacronutrientApparent consumption proportion, 2018–19(%)Recommended range(a)(%)

Protein15.515–25
Carbohydrate
Total fat
43.8
38.8
45–65
20–35

Footnote(s): (a) See: Nutrient Reference Values for Australia and New Zealand.
Source: Apparent Consumption of Selected Foodstuffs, Australia, 2018–19.