1297.0 - Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification (ANZSRC), 2020  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 30/06/2020   
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Components of ANZSRC

ANZSRC is comprised of three classifications:

    • Type of Activity (ToA);
    • Fields of Research (FoR); and
    • Socio-Economic Objectives (SEO).

Explanatory notes and guidelines for classifying by each are available in the datacubes under the downloads tab.

ToA allows R&D to be categorised according to the type of research effort. It is a flat classification with four categories:
    • pure basic research;
    • strategic basic research;
    • applied research; and
    • experimental development.

FoR allows R&D activity to be categorised according to common knowledge domains and/or methodologies used in the R&D. FoR is a hierarchical classification and includes three levels: Divisions (at the broadest level), Groups and Fields (at the finest level). This structure is illustrated in the following example:

Division31 Biological sciences
Group 3103 Ecology
Field310301 Behavioural ecology

SEO allows R&D to be categorised according to the intended purpose or outcome of the R&D as perceived by the data provider or researcher. SEO is a hierarchical classification and includes three levels: Divisions (at the broadest level), Groups and Objectives (at the finest level). This structure is illustrated in the following example:

Division20 Health
Group 2003 Provision of health and support services
Objective200307 Nursing

Use of ANZSRC

ANZSRC is a set of three related classifications developed for use in the measurement and analysis of research and experimental development (R&D) undertaken in Australia and New Zealand.

To assist users to understand the detailed structure and content of ANZSRC, and to assist in interpreting statistics classified to it, the following information has been provided:
    • references to the conceptual basis of ANZSRC;
    • description of the principal differences between ANZSRC 2008 and ANZSRC 2020;
    • correspondences between ANZSRC 2008 and ANZSRC 2020;
    • correspondences between ANZSRC and NABS, and ANZSRC and FORD;
    • explanation of the classification structure and codes; and
    • inclusion of ANZSRC definitions and explanatory notes (within the attached datacubes).

StatsNZ makes ANZSRC available in its concept and classification management system, Ariā. Users can download ANZSRC in additional formats to the Excel datacubes published by the ABS.

A high level of comparability has been maintained with ANZSRC 2008 in an effort to minimise disruption to data collection. The framework and conceptual basis of ANZSRC has been strengthened to improve coverage, coherence and consistency. Significant improvements have been made to the classification to capture emerging areas of research.

To support international comparisons, it is important for the classification to relate to those used in other countries, particularly those countries whose stages of social and economic development are similar to that of Australia and New Zealand. Therefore, the definition, scope and classification of R&D activities contained in ANZSRC largely follow the guidelines prescribed in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Frascati Manual 2015: Guidelines for Collecting and Reporting Data on Research and Experimental Development, The Measurement of Scientific, Technological and Innovation Activities.

Definition of R&D

R&D is defined according to the OECD standard as comprising creative and systematic work undertaken in order to increase the stock of knowledge - including knowledge of humankind, culture and society - and to devise new applications of available knowledge. For further information on R&D definitions and classification of its components, refer directly to Frascati Manual 2015: Guidelines for Collecting and Reporting Data on Research and Experimental Development, The Measurement of Scientific, Technological and Innovation Activities.



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