4715.0 - National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey, 2018-19 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 11/12/2019   
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Diabetes


Diabetes is a chronic condition which, if left undiagnosed or poorly managed, can lead to heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, limb amputation, depression, anxiety or blindness [1]. The two most common forms of diabetes are Type 1 and Type 2. Diabetes was the second leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in 2018 [2].

The proportion of people who reported having diabetes remained steady at 8%, the same as in 2012–13.

The proportion of people with diabetes was:

    • the same for males and females (both 8%)
    • higher for people living in remote areas (12%) than in non-remote areas (7%).

The proportion of people with diabetes generally increased with age. By 55 years and over, 35% of people had diabetes, more than 11 times higher than the proportion for people aged 25–34 years (3%).


Diabetes by age, 2012–13 and 2018–19

Graph shows between 2012–13 and 2018–19 the rate of diabetes decreased for people aged 25–34 years (from 4% to 3%) and stayed about the same for people aged 35–44 years (both 11%), 45–54 years (22% and 19%), and 55 years and over (39% and 35%).

(a) The difference between 2012–13 and 2018–19 for 35–44 years, 45–54 years and 55 years and over is not statistically significant.


Source(s): 2018–19 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey


Footnotes
1. Diabetes Australia, What is Diabetes?, <https://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/what-is-diabetes>; last accessed 14/11/2019.
2. Sourced from Causes of Death, Australia, 2018 (cat. no. 3303.0).