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1344.8.55.001 - ACT Stats, 2005  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 14/11/2005   
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Contents >> Tourist Accommodation in the ACT - Nov 2005

This article examines characteristics of tourist accommodation in the ACT, looking at hotels, motels and serviced apartments with 15 or more rooms. The data presents analysis over time (1999-2000 to 2004-05), as well as providing comparisons with other states, and national figures.

As at June quarter 2005, there were 58 tourist accommodation establishments with 15 or more rooms operating in the ACT, 2 less than at June quarter 2000. The most common type of accommodation at June quarter 2005 was motels, private hotels and guest houses (26 locations), accounting for 45% of all locations. This was followed by serviced apartments, then licensed hotels and resorts (17 and 15 locations respectively).

Over the same period examined, the number of available bed spaces in ACT accommodation establishments has decreased from 15,183 to 13,656, a decrease of 10%. The ACT recorded the only decrease of all states and territories. Victoria experienced the highest increase (14%), while nationally there was an increase of 6%.

Number of bed spaces for tourist accommodation - percentage change from June quarter 2000 to June quarter 2005, by state
Graph - Number of bed spaces for tourist accommodation - percentage change from June quarter 2000 to June quarter 2005, by state


Tourist accommodation establishments in the ACT employed 2,472 people at June quarter 2005, 9% or 210 people more than in June quarter 2000. Nationally, there was a 2% decrease in the number of people employed in tourist accommodation for the same period.

Guest arrivals to the ACT in 2004-05 totalled 856,900; similar to the number in 1999-2000 (851,200). All other states and territories experienced increases and nationally, there was an increase of 17% in guest arrivals over the period.
Guest arrivals for tourist accommodation - percentage change 1999-2000 to 2004-05, by state
Graph - Guest arrivals for tourist accommodation - percentage change 1999-2000 to 2004-05, by state


For 2004-05, the number of room nights occupied in ACT tourist accommodation establishments of 15 rooms and over was 1.2 million, an increase of 10% compared with 1999-2000 (1.1 million). This was the second lowest increase recorded for all states and territories over the period, and below the national increase of 16%.

In the ACT, takings from tourist accommodation increased from $111.4 million in 1999-2000 to $145.1 million in 2004-05, an increase of 30%. This was below the national increase of 38%.
Takings for ACT tourist accommodation, 1999-2000 to 2004-05
Graph - Takings for ACT tourist accommodation, 1999-2000 to 2004-05


The room occupancy rate in ACT tourist accommodation was the highest for all states and territories for 2004-2005 (68.1%), 5.3 percentage points above the national rate (62.8%). This represented an increase of 5.1 percentage points for the ACT between 1999-2000 and 2004-2005.
Room occupancy rates for tourist accommodation - 1999-2000 to 2004-2005, by state
Graph - Room occupancy rates for tourist accommodation - 1999-2000 to 2004-2005, by state


For 2004-2005, guests in tourist accommodation in the ACT stayed 2.3 days on average, unchanged from 1999-2000, and similar to the national average. Queensland (2.7 days) experienced the highest average number of days stayed for 2004-2005, of all states and territories.

To find out more about the ACT and ACT statistics see the ACT Theme Page

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