New 2011 Census data reveals more about the Australian Capital Territory

30 October 2012 | ACT/05

New data from the 2011 Census of Population and Housing announced by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) today has added to the snapshot of the Australian Capital Territory revealed by the release of initial Census results in June.

ABS Australian Capital Territory Regional Director Denise Carlton said the latest release of 2011 Census data marked an important time for the ABS, Australia, and the Australian Capital Territory.

“2011 Census data released earlier this year has already shed some light on who we are as a nation and a region, and where we live,” Ms Carlton said.

“The latest tranche of Census data now paints a picture of what we do and how we live, helping to further shape the Australian Capital Territory over the next five years, and providing a brighter future for our region.

“In particular, Census data provides a valuable insight into the growth and development of the Australian Capital Territory, our people and our workforce.”

Today’s second Census release provides data on the following topics at all geographic levels, from Australia and states and territories, to capital cities and suburbs:
• Labour force as reported
• Hours worked
• Industry and occupation
• Method of travel to work
• Highest level of education and fields of study
• Place of work
• State and territory migration.

Ms Carlton encouraged everyone to make use of Australia’s richest statistical resource, which provides a comprehensive snapshot of the Australian Capital Territory and all areas within it.

“Census data is available free online and can be used for a wide range of purposes. Our range of new, easy-to-use tools, including QuickStats, makes searching Census data quick and easy,” she said.

Data from the 2011 Census of Population and Housing is now available on the ABS website. Visit www.abs.gov.au/census.

Key second release Census data for the Australian Capital Territory is detailed below.

2011 Census of Population and Housing second release data – Australian Capital Territory

Labour force and hours worked

The latest figures show the Australian Capital Territory’s total labour force consisted of 203,207 people aged 15 years and over at the time of the last Census on 9 August 2011, an increase of 20,717 people from 182,490 in 2006.

Nearly two thirds (65 per cent) of the Australian Capital Territory’s labour force reported being employed full-time, with 58.4 per cent of this workforce male, similar to 2006. In comparison, of the 25.1 per cent of the Australian Capital Territory’s labour force who reported being employed part-time, 65 per cent were female, a drop from 65.7 per cent in 2006.

In 2011, more than one quarter (25.7 per cent) of the population aged 15 years and over reported not being in the labour force, similar to 25.6 per cent in 2006. This represented an increase of 7,812 people who included retirees, students, and stay at home parents.

Unemployed females looking for work in 2011 increased to 45.4 per cent, up from 43.5 per cent in 2006, while unemployed males looking for work declined from 56.5 per cent to 54.6 per cent in 2011.

There has also been a decline in the proportion of people who reported working 40 hours or more the week before Census night, from 46.8 per cent in 2006, to 45.4 per cent in 2011, a decrease of 1.4 percentage points.

Industry

The Australian Capital Territory has not experienced a shift in its primary employment industry, unlike the rest of Australia, with 32.7 per cent of the Territory’s population working in Public Administration and Safety, an increase from 30.1 per cent in 2006.

The Australian Capital Territory Retail Trade industry accounts for 7.6 per cent of the Territory’s employment, a decline of 1.1 percentage points since 2006, while the Health Care and Social Assistance industry, which was the fourth most reported employment industry in the Australian Capital Territory in 2006, is now the third most reported industry of employment. It accounted for 9.2 per cent in 2011, a 0.4 percentage point decline since 2006.

Occupation

In terms of occupation, the Australian Capital Territory population was still working in the same top five occupations as in 2006: Professionals (29.7 per cent); Clerical and Administrative Workers (19.1 per cent); Managers (15.8 per cent); Technicians and Trades Workers (10.2 per cent); and Community and Personal Service Workers (9.3 per cent).

However, Professionals and Managers showed the largest proportionate increase since 2006, both increasing by 0.4 of a percentage point, reflecting a faster rate of growth compared to other occupations. There was a slight decline in the proportion of people reporting the occupations of Technician and Trades Workers.

Method of travel to work

The latest Census data further revealed that people in the Australian Capital Territory still prefer to travel to work by car than any other means, with 69.3 per cent of the population reporting this as their primary method of travel to work (either as the driver or passenger).

While the household car is still the preferred method of travel to work for most people, there is an increasing proportion of people walking and riding a bicycle to work. In 2011, 763 more people walked to work than in 2006, and 914 more people rode a bicycle to work.

There has been a small decline in the proportion of people who catch a bus to work, with 5.6 per cent of people in 2011 compared to 5.8 per cent in 2006, reflecting a slower rate of growth compared to other methods of travel.

Highest level of education

Turning to education, there has been an increase in the proportion of people in the Australian Capital Territory undertaking additional studies, with increases in the number of people who reported completing Postgraduate and Bachelor Degrees, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates, Advanced Diplomas and Diplomas, and Certificates III/IV.

The number of people who have successfully completed Postgraduate Degrees has risen from 17,860 in 2006 to 25,734 in 2011 – an increase of 44.1 per cent.

Fields of study

Society and Culture (19.4 per cent) and Management and Commerce (19 per cent) were the two most common reported fields of study, as they were in 2006. There has been an increase in both fields of study with an additional 6,731 people studying Society and Culture in 2011 and an additional 7,517 people studying Management and Commerce.

There have been declines in the proportions of people studying both Engineering and Related Technologies (down from 10.2 per cent in 2006 to 9.6 per cent in 2011) and Education (up from 7.2 per cent to 6.8 per cent).

State and territory migration

Internal migration is the movement of people from one place of residence to another within Australia. These figures are traditionally used for infrastructure and community planning.

The latest figures from the 2011 Census have shown a continued decline in the proportion of people in the Australian Capital Territory who moved within the state in the five years prior to Census night. This is consistent with the national trend.

The proportion of people who have moved to the Australian Capital Territory in the five years prior to Census night from interstate has declined from 33.9 per cent in 2006 to 32.1 per cent in 2011. However, of the people who did move to the Australian Capital Territory from interstate, 18.9 per cent came from New South Wales. The proportion of people moving to the Australian Capital Territory from overseas has jumped markedly from 11.5 per cent in 2006 to 16.1 per cent in 2011.

Of the Australian Capital Territory residents who moved in the year prior to the 2011 Census, most moved within the Territory (59.2 per cent), while 12.2 per cent of people had moved to the Australian Capital Territory from overseas in the year prior to 2011.

The Census collects information on where people lived, one year ago and five years ago prior to Census night. This information only reflects movements which coincide with these particular points in time, even though there may have been multiple movements during this period.