1384.6 - Statistics - Tasmania, 2006  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 04/04/2006   
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Contents >> Health >> Health services and research >> Hospitals >> Hospital services

A separation is an episode of care which can be a total hospital stay (from admission to discharge, transfer or death) or a portion of a hospital stay ending in a change of status (for example from acute care to rehabilitation). Hospitals providing acute care services are those in which the treatments typically require short durations of stay (Source: Australian Hospital Statistics, 2000–01, AIHW).

In Tasmania between 1998-99 and 1999-2000 the rate of hospital separations (public and private) was under 260 per 1,000 population, before increasing to 273 per 1,000 population in 2000-01. In 2001-2002, the rate of hospital separations increased further to 313 per 1,000 population.

Hospital beds (per 1,000 population) refers to the total number of beds in all hospitals (public) providing acute care services per 1,000 estimated mean resident population. The Table below shows that the number of hospital beds per 1,000 population increased in 2001- 02 in Tasmania, while the national average fell slightly.


The Table also shows that the average length of stay in hospital is slightly longer in Tasmania in 2001-02 compared to the national average, with a 0.3 of a day difference.

HOSPITAL SERVICES
1999-2000
2000-01
2000-02
2002-03




Tas.
Aust.
Tas.
Aust.
Tas.
Aust.
Tas.
Aust.
Hospital separations (per 1,000 population)
258
298
273
305
313
324
n.p.
334
Hospital beds (per 1,000 population)
4.0
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.5
4.0
n.a.
4.0
Average length of stay in hospital (days)
4.2
3.8
4.3
3.7
3.9
3.6
n.p.
3.5

n.p. = not published
n.a. = not available
Source: Australian Social Trends 2005 (cat. no. 4102.0).



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