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1370.0 - Measures of Australia's Progress, 2013  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 14/11/2013   
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Measures of Australia's Progress

Safety

Australians aspire to a society where people are safe and feel safe
Graph Image for Physical assault victimisation rate

Image: Tilde - Not changed greatly

Safety in Australia has not changed greatly in recent years

    Indicator: Physical assault victimisation rate

    Why is this theme important?

    Australians told us that it is important to be safe and free from physical and emotional violence, danger and harassment in their relationships, in public, while at work or in other areas of their life. People thought that this could be achieved by reducing crime, and through urban planning, workplace regulations, policing and justice systems, safe housing and other mechanisms that ensure public safety. As well as being safe, the consultation revealed that people need to feel safe in order to function well in their lives and to have places where they can take shelter if they are not safe.

    How have we decided things haven't changed greatly?

    We have decided that there has been little change in whether safety is getting better or not in Australia because the victimisation rate for physical assault (our headline progress indicator for safety) hasn't moved much in recent years.

    For progress, we would expect to see the victimisation rate for physical assault decrease.

    Between 2008-09 and 2011-12, the proportion of people who were victims of physical assault remained steady at around 3%. In 2011-12, there were an estimated 539,800 victims of physical assault in Australia, compared to an estimated 527,400 victims in 2008-09.

    Why this headline progress indicator?

    Personal safety is an important part of the aspiration for safety.

    The victimisation rate for physical assault is considered a good measure of progress for safety. This is because it is the most prevalent type of offence against a person experienced in Australia and can have far-reaching consequences. Crimes committed against individuals can impact directly on the physical, financial and emotional wellbeing of the victim, as well as indirectly on the people around them. However, we recognise that personal safety is only one dimension of safety.

    Quality assessment (see key)

    Image: Icon for 'Partial measure' This indicator is a partial measure of the concept of safety as described above (based on Aspirations for our Nation).

    Image: Icon for 'High quality' The data source is of high quality.

    Let's break it down!

    Victimisation rates for physical assault across the states and territories remained fairly stable between 2008-09 and 2011-12, with the exception of the Australian Capital Territory, where victimisation rates for physical assault rose from 2.8% in 2008-09 to 4.7% in 2011-12.

    Use the drop down menu on the graph to look at other breakdowns of the indicator (graphs are also available on the further info page).

    But that is not the whole story...

    There is more to safety than the victimisation rate for physical assault. Look through the other tabs on this page to see if the other elements of safety have progressed.

    Check out our further info page for useful links, a glossary and references relating to this chapter.
Graph Image for Malicious property damage victimisation rate
There has been progress in the reduction of crime at the national level in recent years, when measured by the decrease in malicious property damage

Indicator: Malicious property damage victimisation rate

Why is this element important?

Crime takes many forms and can have a major impact on the wellbeing of victims, their families and friends, and the wider community. Those most directly affected may suffer financially, physically, psychologically or emotionally. Household crimes may affect an individual or family's feelings of safety or security and may result in property damage and/or financial loss.

Go to the overall progress tab and further info page for more information about safety.

How have we decided there has been progress?

We have decided crime in Australia has progressed in recent years because the victimisation rate for malicious property damage (our progress indicator for crime) has decreased.

Between 2008-09 and 2011-12, the victimisation rate for malicious property damage decreased from 11.1% to 7.5%. In 2011-12, an estimated 649,900 Australian households experienced malicious property damage, down from 912,500 Australian households in 2008-09.

Why this progress indicator?

Safety of personal property is an important part of the aspiration for safety.

Malicious property damage is the most prevalent type of household crime experienced in Australia. The victimisation rate for malicious property damage is considered a good measure of progress for crime because it is one of the aspects of crime that shows change over time. In Australia, the prevalence rates for both physical assault and homicide remain fairly static at the national indicator level.

Quality assessment (see key)

Image: Icon for 'Partial measure' This indicator is a partial measure of crime.

Image: Icon for 'High quality' The data source is of high quality.

Let's break it down!

Victimisation rates for malicious property damage significantly decreased across all states and territories between 2008-09 and 2011-12. The most notable decreases were in the Northern Territory and Australian Capital Territory, where rates decreases from 19.6% to 10.3%, and 15.3% to 9.1%, respectively.

Use the drop down menu on the graph to look at other breakdowns of the indicator (graphs are also available on the further info page).

But that is not the whole story...

There is more to safety than crime. Look through the other tabs on this page to see if the other elements of safety have progressed.

Check out our further info page for useful links, a glossary and references relating to this chapter.
A data gap currently exists for safe environments


In MAP there are several types of data gaps where:
1. the concept is not yet developed enough to measure;
2. the concept is important for progress but may not lend itself to meaningful measurement;
3. there is no data of sufficient quality to inform on progress; or
4. there is only one data point, so a progress assessment cannot be made.

We propose to use a social disorder measure as a progress indicator for the safe environments element in the future, when sufficient data becomes available for us to assess whether progress has been made.

But that is not the whole story...

There is more to safety than safe environments. Look through the other tabs on this page to see if the other elements of safety have progressed.

Check out our further info page for useful links, a glossary and references relating to this chapter.

A data gap currently exists for safety regulations and systems


In MAP there are several types of data gaps where:
1. the concept is not yet developed enough to measure;
2. the concept is important for progress but may not lend itself to meaningful measurement;
3. there is no data of sufficient quality to inform on progress; or
4. there is only one data point, so a progress assessment cannot be made.

At the moment we are considering this element to be the second type of data gap listed above, i.e. although the concept is important for progress, it may not lend itself to meaningful measurement. This being the case, while we will continue to consider this area of progress there is no guarantee that we will have a progress indicator for it in the future.

But that is not the whole story...

There is more to safety than safety regulations and systems. Look through the other tabs on this page to see if the other elements of safety have progressed.

Check out our further info page for useful links, a glossary and references relating to this chapter.

A data gap currently exists for refuge


In MAP there are several types of data gaps where:
1. the concept is not yet developed enough to measure;
2. the concept is important for progress but may not lend itself to meaningful measurement;
3. there is no data of sufficient quality to inform on progress; or
4. there is only one data point, so a progress assessment cannot be made.

In order to capture the spirit of this idea in a measure, further development will need to be undertaken. We will continue to explore options for a suitable indicator in the future.

But that is not the whole story...

There is more to safety than refuge. Look through the other tabs on this page to see if the other elements of safety have progressed.

Check out our further info page for useful links, a glossary and references relating to this chapter.

A data gap currently exists for feelings of safety


In MAP there are several types of data gaps where:
1. the concept is not yet developed enough to measure;
2. the concept is important for progress but may not lend itself to meaningful measurement;
3. there is no data of sufficient quality to inform on progress; or
4. there is only one data point, so a progress assessment cannot be made.

We propose to use the proportion of people who feel safe at home alone during the day, at home alone after dark and walking in the local area alone after dark, as a progress indicator for the feelings of safety element in the future, when sufficient data becomes available for us to assess whether progress has been made.

But that is not the whole story...

There is more to safety than feelings of safety. Look through the other tabs on this page to see if the other elements of safety have progressed.

Check out our further info page for useful links, a glossary and references relating to this chapter.



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