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1383.0.55.001 - Measures of Australia's Progress: Summary Indicators, 2009  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 30/04/2009   
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CRIME



Victims of selected personal crimes
Victims of selected household crimes
Column graph: Victims of selected personal crimes - 1998, 2002 and 2005
Column graph: Vicims of selected household crimes - 1998, 2002 and 2005
For technical information see Endnote 1.
Source: Crime and Safety, Australia, 2005
(cat. no. 4509.0).
For technical information see Endnote 2.
Source: Crime and Safety, Australia, 2005
(cat. no. 4509.0).

Though small, the victimisation prevalence rates for selected personal crimes showed an increase between 1998 and 2005 from 4.8% to 5.3%, the same level as in 2002. Most of these people were assaulted. Between 1998 and 2005, the proportion of households that were victims of selected household crimes fell from 9.0% to 6.2%.

ABOUT THESE INDICATORS

Crime takes many forms and can have a major impact on the wellbeing of victims, their families and friends, and the wider community. Those most directly affected may suffer financially, physically, psychologically and emotionally, while the fear of crime can affect people and restrict their lives in many ways. There are other costs as well, including the provision of law enforcement services by the police, courts and associated legal services, and corrective services.

Although it would be desirable to have a single indicator of the cost of crime to society, one does not exist. Instead the headline indicators are two measures of victims of common criminal offences: 'selected personal crimes' and 'selected household crimes'. The former refers to assault, sexual assault or robbery. The latter refers to actual or attempted break-in and motor vehicle theft. Personal crimes are not restricted to crimes committed in the victim's home, and so include crimes at people's place of work or study and so on. The victimisation rates for selected personal crimes are for assault and robbery victims among people aged 15 or over, and sexual assault among people aged 18 and over (Endnote 1). The victimisation rates for selected household crimes are for actual or attempted break-ins and motor vehicle thefts across all households.

SEE ALSO

State and territory spreadsheets
Crime - Measures of Australia's Progress, 2006
Themes - National Centre for Crime and Justice Statistics

ENDNOTES

1. The victimisation rates for personal crimes are for assault and robbery victims among people aged 15 and over, and sexual assault among people aged 18 and over. Completion of the sexual assault questions for the ABS Crime and Safety Survey was voluntary, and some respondents chose not to complete them. For these respondents selected data items were imputed following a standard set of rules based on the assumption that the victimisation rates were equal for respondents and non-respondents alike within age groups and sex categories.

2. The victimisation rates for household crimes are for actual or attempted break-ins and motor vehicle thefts across all households (private dwellings).

LINK TO THE DETAILED SUMMARY

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