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4906.0 - Personal Safety, Australia, 2012  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 11/12/2013   
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Contents >> Demographics of those who have experienced violence >> Prevalence of violence during the last 12 months by current state or territory of residence


PREVALENCE OF VIOLENCE DURING THE LAST 12 MONTHS - CURRENT STATE OR TERRITORY OF RESIDENCE

Table 8 shows men's and women's experience of violence in the 12 months prior to survey by their State or Territory of residence at time of survey. While the survey was not designed to produce reliable State/Territory level data for men, some data was able to be produced for the larger States and has been included where possible in the tables. Note: a person's State or Territory of residence at time of survey is not necessarily the State or Territory in which the violence took place. Refer to Endnote 2 for an explanation of significance testing.

For women aged 18 years and over, there was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of violence for women in each State/Territory compared to the national estimate, with the exception of the Northern Territory where women experienced violence at a higher rate. Of all women aged 18 years and over in the Northern Territory, an estimated 8.1% had experienced violence in the 12 months prior to survey compared to the national estimate for women of 5.3%.

For men aged 18 years and over, there was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of violence for men in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia or Western Australia compared to the national estimate. No data for men is available for Tasmania, the Northern Territory or the Australian Capital Territory. For further information, refer to Survey Design in the Explanatory Notes.


PREVALENCE OF VIOLENCE DURING THE LAST 12 MONTHS - DISABILITY STATUS

The 2012 PSS collected information to determine whether or not someone had a disability or long term health condition (refer to Endnote 3 for further detail). Table 11 shows men's and women's experience of violence in the 12 months prior to survey by their disability status at the time of survey.

There was no statistically significant difference between persons aged 18 years and over with and without a disability or long term health condition and their likelihood of experiencing violence in the 12 months prior to survey (refer Table 11). Refer to Endnote 2 for an explanation of significance testing.


FURTHER INFORMATION

Table 10 also shows men's and women's experience of violence in the 12 months prior to survey by their Broad Country of Birth grouping (refer to Endnote 4 for further detail).


ENDNOTES

Endnote 1
For a comprehensive list of all the demographic characteristics collected in the 2012 PSS, refer to the Data item list. These other data are available, on a fee for service basis, as customised tables through the ABS Information Consultancy or on the Confidentialised Unit Record File which is expected to be released in March 2014.

Endnote 2
All differences and changes mentioned have been tested for statistical significance with a 95% level of confidence that there is a real difference in the two populations being tested. To determine whether there is a statistical difference between any other two estimates, significance testing should be undertaken. For further information, refer to the Technical Note.

Endnote 3
Disability status:
A person was defined as having a disability or long-term health condition if they had one or more conditions which had lasted, or were likely to last, for six months or more, and that restricted every day activities. People were identified as having a profound or severe core activity limitation if they required help or supervision for one or more core activities, such as self-care, mobility or communication. For further information refer to the Glossary.

As noted in the Introduction, a specific requirement of the PSS was that interviews were conducted in private. Where a respondent required the assistance of another person to communicate with the interviewer, interviews were not able to be conducted. Therefore it is likely that the PSS will under represent those with a profound or severe communication disability.

In addition, the scope of the PSS is persons living in a private dwelling. Therefore the PSS also excludes people with a disability who usually reside in non-private dwellings such as care facilities.

Endnote 4
It was a requirement of the survey that all interviews be conducted alone in a private setting, ensuring that other members of the household were not aware of the survey content or the responses given. Interpreters or other family members were not used. A small number of interviewers with foreign language skills were trained for the PSS. Where a respondent required the assistance of another person to communicate with the interviewer (and an interviewer who spoke their language was not available), interviews were not able to be conducted. Therefore it is possible that the PSS may under represent those from a non-English speaking background. For further information refer to Data Collection in the Explanatory Notes.


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