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4913.0 - Pregnancy and Employment Transitions, Australia, Nov 2011 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 16/11/2012   
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GLOSSARY

Away from job/business throughout pregnancy

Women who had a job while pregnant, but who were on leave/away from their job or business for the full period of the pregnancy.

Baby Bonus

Baby Bonus is paid by the Australian Government to eligible families following the birth of a child or for adopted children who enter the families care before they turn 16 years old. A family can not receive both Paid Parental Leave and Baby Bonus for the one birth or adoption.

Birth mother

The natural mother of a child, i.e. the woman who gave birth to that child. Birth mothers residing with at least one child aged under two years were in scope for this survey.

Born in Australia

Includes persons born in Australia, Norfolk Island and Australian External Territories.

Current main job

The main job which the person is currently employed at.

Contributing family worker

A person who works without pay in an economic enterprise operated by a relative.

Employed

People aged 15 years and over who, during the reference week:

  • worked for one hour or more for pay, profit, commission or payment in kind, in a job or business or on a farm (comprising employees, employers and own account workers; or
  • worked for one hour or more without pay in a family business or on a farm (i.e. contributing family workers); or
  • were employees who had a job but were not at work and were:
      • away from work for less than four weeks up to the end of the reference week;
      • away from work for more than four weeks up to the end of the reference week and received pay for some or all of the four week period to the end of the reference week;
      • away from work as a standard work or shift arrangement;
      • on strike or locked out;
      • on workers' compensation and expected to return to their job; or
  • were employers or own account workers who had a job, business or farm, but were not at work.

Employees

People who:
  • worked for a public or private employer; and
  • received remuneration in wages or salary; or are paid a retainer fee from their employer while working on a commission basis, or for tips, piece-rates, or payment in kind; or
  • operated their own incorporated enterprise with or without hiring employees.

Employers

People who operate their own unincorporated economic enterprise or engages independently in a profession or trade, and hires one or more employees.

Employment type

Classifies employed persons according to the following categories on the basis of their job:
  • Employees (excluding OMIEs);
      • With paid leave entitlements;
      • Without paid leave entitlements
  • Owner managers of incorporated enterprises;
  • Owner managers of unincorporated enterprises and
  • Contributing family workers.

Equivalised household income

Total household income that has been adjusted using an equivalence scale. Equivalence scales are used to adjust the actual incomes of households in a way that enables the analysis of the relative well-being of people living in households of different size and composition. For a household comprising more than one person, it is an indicator of the total household income that would need to be received by a lone person household to enjoy the same level of economic well-being as the household in question. If one or more persons in the household has refused to provide income, the household has been excluded from this category.

The equivalence scale is built up by allocating points to each person in a household. Taking the first adult in the household as having a weight of 1 point, each additional person who is 15 years or older is allocated 0.5 points, and each child under the age of 15 is allocated 0.3 points. Equivalised household income is derived by dividing total household income by a factor equal to the sum of the equivalence points allocated to the household members. The equivalised income of a lone person household is the same as its unequivalised income.

Family

Two or more persons, one of whom is at least 15 years of age, who are related by blood, marriage (registered or de facto), adoption, step or fostering, and who are usually resident in the same household. The basis of a family is formed by identifying the presence of a couple relationship, lone parent-child relationship or other blood relationship. Some households will, therefore, contain more than one family.

Family day care

A type of formal care provided in caregivers' homes.

First job started/returned to

The first job in which the person had started or returned to since the birth of child.

Formal care

Regulated care away from the child's home. The main types of formal care are long day care, family day care and occasional care.

Full-time workers

Employed persons who usually worked 35 hours or more a week.

Had a job while pregnant

Women who had a job for some or all of the period during which they were pregnant. This includes women who were away from their job or business throughout their pregnancy.

Household

A group of two or more related or unrelated people who usually reside in the same dwelling.

Incorporated enterprise

A enterprise which is registered as a separate legal entity to its members or owners. Also known as a limited liability company.

Industry

An industry is a group of businesses or organisations that undertake similar economic activities to produce both goods and services. In this publication, industry refers to ANZSIC Division as classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006 (Revision 1.0) (cat. no. 1292.0).

Informal care

Unregulated care either in the child's home or elsewhere. It includes care by (step) brothers or sisters, care by grandparents, care by other relatives (including the other parent) and care by other (unrelated) people such as friends, neighbours, nannies or babysitters. It may be paid or unpaid.

Job

In this survey a 'job' is defined as a set of tasks designed to be performed by one person either:
  • for an employer in return for pay, commission or payment in kind; or
  • as an operator of an enterprise (either incorporated or unincorporated); or
  • when engaging independently in a profession or trade; or
  • as a contributing family worker working without pay in an enterprise operated by a relative.

Job held during pregnancy

The main job in which the person was working in before the birth of child.

Job sharing

Job sharing is an arrangement in which two or more people share the one full-time job, each working part time. Job sharing is available in a wide range of industries, and is in place to help employees achieve a balance between work and other aspects of their life.

Leave

Paid or unpaid time away from work taken by employed persons. An individual's specific work arrangements will determine the particular lengths and types of leave to which they have access.

Length of leave

Total amount of paid or unpaid leave or time away from a job for the child's birth and subsequent care until the mother returns or joins the workforce after the birth of the child or until the date of interview. It refers to the total amount of leave taken by the women or partner up until the date of interview.

Long day care

Regulated care that is provided to children in a dedicated centre.

Long service leave

A period of paid leave granted to an employee in recognition of a long period of service to an employer.

Main job

The job in which the person usually works the most hours.

Married

Marital status relates to a 'social marital status' where married is classified as a person who is living with another person in a couple relationship. This relationship is either a registered marriage, or a de facto marriage.

Mean

The mean is the arithmetic average of a group of values. It is calculated by adding the observed values and dividing by the number of observations.

Not in the labour force

People who were not in the categories employed or unemployed as defined.

Occasional care

A type of formal care provided mainly for families who require short term care for their children.

Occupation

An occupation is a collection of jobs that are sufficiently similar in their title and tasks, skill level and skill specialisation which are grouped together for the purposes of classification. In this publication occupation refers to Major Groups as defines by ANZSCO-Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, Revision 1, 2009 (cat. no. 1220.0).

One parent family

For the purpose of this survey, a family consisting of a lone female parent with at least one natural child aged under two years of age who is also usually resident in the family. The family may also include any number of other dependants, non-dependants and other related individuals.

Other paid leave (women)

For the purpose of this survey, all types of paid leave other than paid maternity leave, paid holiday leave or long service leave.

Other person care

Informal care by people who are not related to the child including friends, babysitters and nannies.

Other relative care

Informal care by relatives of the child excluding parents, not otherwise categorised.

Other unpaid leave

This includes all other types of unpaid leave that has not been stated which the women or their partner took for the birth of child.

Own account workers

People who operate their own unincorporated economic enterprise or engage independently in a profession or trade and hire no employees.

Owner managers

People who work in their own business, with or without employees, whether or not the business in an incorporated enterprise. Comprises owner managers of incorporated enterprises and owner managers of unincorporated enterprises.

Owner managers of incorporated enterprises (OMIE)

People who work in their own incorporated enterprise, that is, a business entity which is registered as a separate legal entity to its members or owners (also known as a limited liability company). These people are classified as employees under 'status in employment'.

Owner managers of unincorporated enterprises (OMUE)

People who operate their own unincorporated enterprise, that is, a business entity in which the owner and the business are legally inseparable, so that the owner is liable for any business debts that are incurred. Includes those engaged independently in a trade or profession. These persons are classified as employers under 'status in employment' if their business has employees, or own account worker if they do not.

Paid maternity leave

Paid leave that a woman receives for the birth of her child. It is generally for a period before the due date and just after the birth of the child. Depending on the woman's workplace, she may be entitled to paid maternity leave for a number of months.

Paid Parental Leave

For the purpose of this survey mothers of children born on or after 1 January 2011, were deemed to be entitled to Paid Parental Leave, subject to government eligibility conditions. The Paid Parental Leave scheme provides financial support to eligible working parents of newborn or recently adopted children. If eligible, persons may receive up to 18 weeks of Parental Leave Pay at the rate of the National Minimum Wage.

Partner

For the purpose of this survey, a person who was:
  • in a couple relationship with the selected respondent (either a registered or de facto marriage; including same-sex couples); and
  • a usual resident of the same household as the respondent; and
  • was the same partner during the women's pregnancy.

Part-time workers

Employed persons who usually worked less than 35 hours a week.

Paternity/parenting leave

Paternity/parenting leave is leave provided to employees to care for their newborn child and during the first year of the child's life. Some workplaces offer this paid leave anywhere from 1-14 weeks. This leave does not break continuity of service.

Permanently left job

Ceasing employment in a particular job with no intention of returning.

Public/private sector

The public/private classification is used to identify whether an enterprise is a public or private unit. The public sector includes all government units, such as government departments, non-market non-profit institutions that are controlled and mainly financed by government, and corporations and quasi-corporations that are controlled by government. All other enterprises are classified to the private sector.

Quintile

A grouping derived by ranking all units in the population in ascending order according to some continuous variable such as income and dividing the ranked population into five equal groups, each comprising 20% of the population.

Status in employment

Employed persons classified by whether they were employees, employers, own account workers or contributing family workers.

Time away from work (partner)

Time away from work taken by owner managers following the birth of a child. Time away from work will generally be unpaid.

Unemployed

Persons aged 15 years and over who were not employed during reference week, and:
  • had actively looked for full-time or part-time work at any time in the four weeks up to the end of the reference week and were available for work in the reference week; or
  • were waiting to start a new job within four weeks from the end of reference week, and could have started in the reference week if the job had been available then.

Unincorporated enterprise

A business entity in which the owner and the business are legally inseparable, so that the owner is liable for any business debt that are incurred.

Unpaid maternity leave

Unpaid maternity leave is leave without pay specifically designed so that women can take time off work to care for their child in their first year, without having to permanently leave their job. This period of time away from work does not count as a break in service, as it would for some other types of unpaid leave such as 'leave without pay'.

Usual weekly hours of work

Usual weekly hours of work refers to a typical period rather than to a specified reference period. The concept of usual hours applies both to people at work and to people temporarily absent from work, and is defined as the hours worked during a typical week. The time includes all regular paid and unpaid overtime.

With paid leave entitlements

Employees who were entitled to either paid holiday leave or paid sick leave (or both) in their main job.

Without paid leave entitlements

Employees who were not entitled to either paid holiday leave or paid sick leave, or did not know whether they were entitled to paid holiday leave or paid sick leave in their main job. For more information, see paragraph 24 of the Explanatory Notes.

Women with children less than two years old

The birth mother of a child living in the same household who was under the age of two years at the date of interview. If the birth mother has more than one child under the age of two years, data relates to the pregnancy and work arrangements for the most recent birth.

Worked in a job while pregnant

Women who worked in a job or business for some or all of their pregnancy. This includes women who took paid or unpaid leave and women who had no leave entitlements for the birth depending on their individual employment status.


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