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1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2004  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 27/02/2004   
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Contents >> Culture and recreation >> National Estate

The term 'the National Estate' was coined by Sir Clough Williams-Ellis, a British architect, in the 1940s. It was introduced into Australia in 1973 when the Commonwealth Government set up a Commission of Inquiry into the National Estate, headed by Hon. Mr Justice RM Hope. The inquiry aimed to 'preserve and enhance the quality of the National Estate'. Following the recommendations of this inquiry, the Australian Heritage Commission Act was passed in 1975 with the support of all political parties.

'The National Estate' is defined in the legislation as:

      ... those places, being components of the natural environment of Australia, or the cultural environment of Australia, that have aesthetic, historic, scientific or social significance or other special value for future generations as well as for the present community.
Both publicly and privately owned places form part of the National Estate. It encompasses places which are important to local communities, as well as those which are of regional or state significance. The National Estate also includes places which have national or international significance. Broad stretches of coastline, desert, forest and national parks, as well as isolated geological monuments and small areas which might provide habitats for endangered plant or animal species are part of the National Estate. It can cover whole villages and suburbs, streetscapes, single mansions, cattlemen's huts, railway yards and other reminders of the historical development of Australia's society and economy. Places of significance to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander peoples, such as rock engravings, rock art galleries, fish traps, carved trees, meeting places and ceremonial sites are also part of Australia's National Estate, as are reminders of early European settlement, such as mission stations.

The Australian Heritage Commission has a statutory obligation to identify the National Estate. It has established the Register of the National Estate to place on public record Indigenous, historic and natural places to assist in their management and conservation, and, in particular, their protection from potentially adverse government actions.

During 2002-03, the number of places on the Register of the National Estate increased by 153 to 13,094. This compares with an increase of 96 in 2001-02. Details by state or territory and type of place, and comparisons with the previous year, are shown in table 12.1.

12.1 PLACES ON THE REGISTER OF THE NATIONAL ESTATE

Indigenous places
Historic places
Natural places
Total




2001-02
2002-03
2001-02
2002-03
2001-02
2002-03
2001-02
2002-03

New South Wales
221
221
3,084
3,125
478
487
3,783
3,833
Victoria
111
111
2,412
2,427
247
254
2,770
2,792
Queensland
155
155
737
738
320
322
1,212
1,215
Western Australia
74
74
964
969
265
284
1,303
1,327
South Australia
150
153
1,204
1,209
389
390
1,743
1,752
Tasmania
65
66
1,201
1,209
253
263
1,519
1,538
Northern Territory
105
105
144
147
62
63
311
315
Australian Capital Territory(a)
28
30
183
195
30
30
241
255
External territories
-
-
39
42
20
25
59
67
Total
909
915
9,968
10,061
2,064
2,118
12,941
13,094

(a) Includes Jervis Bay.
Source: Australian Heritage Commission.

More comprehensive statistics on the types of places on the Register of the National Estate can be obtained from the web site, <http://www.ahc.gov.au>.

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