6102.0.55.001 - Labour Statistics: Concepts, Sources and Methods, Feb 2018  
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This document was added or updated on 26/05/2020.

WORK-RELATED INJURIES


INTRODUCTION

The work-related injuries topic is included in the Multipurpose Household Survey (MPHS) every four years, and was first collected in 2005–06. Data on work-related injuries were previously collected in September 2000 as part of the supplementary survey program (see the section: Multipurpose Household Survey for further details).

The survey topic collects information about persons who worked at some time in the last 12 months, and experienced a work-related injury or illness in that period. The purpose of the survey topic is to provide information on the extent of work-related injuries and the characteristics of workers who experience them. Data collected in the survey topic assists in monitoring programs and formulating policies in relation to workers’ compensation and occupational health and safety.

This section describes only those aspects of the methodology that were unique to this survey topic and should therefore be read in conjunction with the overview part of this section (Multipurpose Household Survey), which outlines the survey methodology used in the MPHS.


SURVEY OUTPUT

Data from the survey topic are published in Work–Related Injuries, Australia (cat. no. 6324.0). Microdata are available in a Confidentialised Unit Record File (CURF) or Table Builder - see Technical Manual: Multipurpose Household Survey, Expanded CURF, Australia (cat. no. 4100.0). Other estimates may be available on request.

The survey topic collects information about persons aged 15 years and over who worked at some time in the last 12 months, and who experienced a work-related injury or illness in that period. For those who experienced multiple work related injuries or illnesses in the 12 month period, the most recent work related injury or illness is reported. Estimates are produced on an original basis only (i.e. not seasonally adjusted), and include:

Socio-demographic information

Sex; age; marital status; relationship in household; state or territory of usual residence, area and region of usual residence; remoteness area; birthplace and year of arrival in Australia, educational attainment; whether attending educational institution (15–24 year olds); and current labour force status.

Income

Current weekly gross personal income from all sources; all sources of income; main source of income; all types of government pension / allowance received; and total gross weekly household income from all sources.

Employment characteristics (including current main job, and job in which most recent work-related injury or illness occurred)

Labour force status; employment type; hours usually worked (also in all jobs); duration of job; full-time or part-time status; status in employment; occupation; industry; whether worked shift work; expected future duration in job; and whether worked on a contract.

Most recent work-related injury or illness information

Length of absence from work; whether received financial assistance for medical expenses or income loss; all sources of financial assistance for medical expenses or income loss; whether applied for and whether received workers compensation; main reason did not apply for workers’ compensation; whether occurred within the first 6 months of starting job; type of illness/injury sustained; how illness/injury occurred; location where occurred; main reason for ceasing job; whether returned to work at any time after; whether received any formal training in OH&S risks in workplace at any time prior; whether received formal training in OH&S risks in the workplace in current or most recent job; and type of training undertaken.


Data collected in the survey topic are compiled according to concepts and definitions outlined in the sections: Institutional Units and Economically Active Population; Labour Force Framework; and, Classification Used in Labour Statistics.

Work-related injuries or illnesses have been classified according to the Type of Occurrence Classifications System (TOOCS), which was developed by Safe Work Australia for coding workers' compensation claims. The classification used in the work-related injuries survey topic is based on the TOOCS nature of injury codes (type of injury or illness) and the TOOCS mechanism of injury codes (how the injury or illness occurred).


SCOPE

The scope of this survey topic is restricted to persons aged 15 years and over. The publication Labour Force, Australia (cat. no. 6202.0) contains information about survey design, scope, coverage and population benchmarks relevant to the monthly LFS, which also applies to the MPHS. It also contains definitions of demographic and labour force characteristics, and information about interviewing relevant to both the monthly LFS and MPHS.


SAMPLE SIZE

The size of the sample for the work-related injuries topic in 2005–06 and 2009–10 was increased through user funding to improve the reliability of the estimate. The increase in sample size was achieved by selecting an additional one-third of households in the outgoing rotation group, resulting in approximately double the standard MPHS sample. The initial total sample was approximately 37,700 private dwellings in 2005–06 and 38,600 private dwellings in 2009–10, which reduced to 32,270 and 32,760 respectively after sample loss. For MPHS 2013-14, the initial sample was approximately 42,100 private dwellings, and the number of completed interviews obtained (after taking into account the scope, coverage and sub-sampling exclusions) was 27,300.


RELATED SURVEYS

Data on work-related injuries were previously collected in September 2000 as part of the supplementary survey program. Data from the supplementary survey and the MPHS topic are not directly comparable as there are differences in the concepts measured, scope, collection methodology and sample design (including sample size). The following is a summary of the methodological differences between the September 2000 supplementary survey and the MPHS survey topic:

  • The MPHS topic collects data through a personal interview with one randomly selected household member. In contrast, the September 2000 supplementary survey collected data for all household members in scope from one adult member of the household (any responsible adult methodology).
  • In the MPHS topic, survey respondents are specifically asked to include any injuries or illnesses that occurred at work, travelling to and from work, or while on any work breaks. In the September 2000 supplementary survey, respondents were not specifically asked to include injuries or illnesses that occurred during these periods.
  • In the MPHS topic, recurring injuries or illnesses were only included if the first occurrence was in the last 12 months. In the September 2000 supplementary survey, aggravation of an existing injury or illness was included if the aggravation was experienced while at work in the last 12 months.
  • The MPHS topic includes any injury or illness suffered by an employee resulting from disciplinary action taken against the employee or failure by the employee to obtain a promotion, transfer or benefit in connection with his or her employment. These were excluded in the September 2000 supplementary survey.
  • For the MPHS topic, the estimates are based on data collected over the 12 months of the financial year, while the September 2000 supplementary survey collected data in one month.

See the sections: Labour Force Supplementary Surveys and Multipurpose Household Survey for more information on the survey methodologies.


DATA COMPARABILITY OVER TIME

In order to provide a degree of consistency and comparability over time, changes to survey methods, survey concepts, data item definitions, frequency of collection, and analysis methods are made as infrequently as possible. Changes affecting the LFS may also affect this survey. Such changes are outlined in the section : Labour Force Comparability Over Time and are not repeated here.

2013-14

The following new data items were available on the work-related injuries topic:
  • Whether reported most recent work-related injury or illness to someone in the work place;
  • Did report most recent work-related injury or illness to someone in the work place;
  • Sector of current main job;
  • Sector of job where most recent work-related injury or illness occurred;
  • Self-assessed health status; and
  • Long term health conditions.

2009–10
  • The following new data items were included: remoteness area; number of days of the week/shifts usually worked in job where most recent work-related injury or illness occurred; whether received formal training in Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) risks in the workplace in current or most recent job; and the type of OH&S training undertaken.
  • The data item 'whether received any formal training in OH&S risks in workplace at any time prior to work-related injury or illness' was determined from responses to questions about whether particular types of training were received. In 2005–06 this item was determined by asking a question only about whether any training had been received, not particular types.

2005–06
  • Survey conducted (July 2005 to June 2006) on MPHS for the first time. Data published in Work–Related Injuries, Australia (cat. no. 6324.0).



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