4727.0.55.005 - Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: Nutrition Results - Food and Nutrients, 2012-13  
ARCHIVED ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 20/03/2015  First Issue
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FOODS CONSUMED

    FOOD GROUPS

    Information on food and beverages consumed by respondents in the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (NATSINPAS) was collected and coded at a detailed level, but for output purposes has been categorised using a food classification with major and sub-major group levels. At the broadest level (the major group) there are 24 groups. These groups were designed to categorise foods that share a major component or common feature. Because many foods are in fact mixtures of different ingredients, the food groups will not only contain the main food of that group. For example, a beef and vegetable casserole will belong within the major group of Meat, poultry and game products and dishes, yet will contain vegetables and sauce or gravy.

    Cereal based products and dishes is an example of a major group where there may be a significant proportion of other (non-cereal) ingredients in the foods. While the common feature of this food group is cereal, the foods belonging to this group are very diverse and include biscuits, cakes, pastries, mixed pasta or rice dishes, burgers, pizza and tacos. The Cereal based products and dishes group should not be confused with the Cereal and cereal products group which contains more basic foods such as bread, plain rice, plain pasta, breakfast cereals, oats and other grains.

    For more information see Appendix 1: Example foods in major food groups and the Nutrition section of the Users' Guide.


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 2 years and over consumed an estimated average of 2.96 kilograms of food and beverages per day, made up of a wide variety of foods across the major food groups (see Table 5.1). A majority of respondents in the NATSINPAS reported consuming Cereals and cereal products (87%), Milk products and dishes (83%), Meat, poultry and game products and dishes (76%), Vegetable products and dishes (65%) and Cereal based products and dishes (62%) (see Table 4.1 and Table 4.3).


Was there a difference by remoteness?

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in non-remote areas were more likely than those in remote areas to consume:
Fruit products and dishes (49% compared with 35%)
Soft drinks, and flavoured mineral waters (39% compared with 32%)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in non-remote areas were less likely than those in remote areas to consume:
Cereals and cereal products (86% compared with 91%)
Meat, poultry and game products and dishes (74% compared with 81%)
    How did this compare with non-Indigenous people?

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were more likely than non-Indigenous people to consume:
    Meat, poultry and game products and dishes (76% compared with 69%)
    Fats and oils (56% compared with 46%)
    Snack foods (20% compared with 15%)
      Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were less likely than non-Indigenous people to consume:
      Vegetable products and dishes (65% compared with 75%)
      Cereal based products and dishes (62% compared with 72%)
      Alcoholic beverages (19% compared with 32%)
      Confectionery and cereal/nut/fruit/seed bars (25% compared with 32%)

      Graph Image for Consumption from selected major food groups(a) by Indigenous status, 2012-13

      Footnote(s): (a) Most commonly consumed major food groups on the day prior to interview. See Appendix 1 for examples of food in major food groups.

      Source(s): Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: Nutrition Results – Foods and Nutrients, 2012-13



      Statistics presented in this publication on foods consumed include:

      the proportion of a population consuming food from a food group

      the average (mean) amount consumed by a population (including non-consumers)

      the median amount consumed by a population (excluding non-consumers).

      Care should be taken when interpreting food and beverage consumption in this publication. Analysis of the 2012-13 NATSINPAS suggests that, like in other nutrition surveys, there has been some under-reporting of food intake by participants in this survey. Given the association of under-reporting with overweight/obesity and consciousness of socially acceptable/desirable dietary patterns, under-reporting is unlikely to affect all foods and nutrients equally. For more information on under-reporting in this survey, see the Under-reporting section of this publication and the Users’ Guide.