4533.0 - Directory of Family and Domestic Violence Statistics, 2013  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 03/10/2013   
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On this page:
Contact details
Purpose
Description
Definition of family and domestic violence
Relationship to Defining the data challenge for family, domestic and sexual violence (cat. no. 4529.0)
Family and domestic violence related content (data items collected)
Collection methodology
Scope/target population
Coverage
Data availability/Dissemination
Publications
Collection history
Other directory data sources held by this agency


LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF AUSTRALIAN CHILDREN (LSAC)

DASHBOARD METADATA

Collection typeGeographic coverageFrequencyData availability
  • Survey
  • National
  • State/territory(all)
  • 2-4 years
  • Detailed publication/report publicly available
  • Not published - may be available on request1
[1] May be subject to release conditions


DETAILED METADATA

Contact details

Data custodianAustralian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS)
Contact Deputy Director (Research)
AddressLevel 20, South Tower, 485 La Trobe St, Melbourne, VIC 3000
Telephone03 9214 7888
Facsimile 03 9214 7839
Emailhttp://www.aifs.gov.au/institute/contact.php
Internethttp://www.aifs.gov.au

Data enquiries

ContactLongitudinal Survey Business Owner, Research and Analysis Branch, FAHCSIA
AddressPO Box 7576 Canberra Business Centre, ACT 2610
Facsimile 02 6206 9545
Emaillongitudinalsurveys@fahcsia.gov.au
PURPOSE

The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC)has been designed to examine the impact of Australia’s unique social, economic and cultural environment on children’s well-being, cognitive and behavioural development, particularly in regard to issues of policy relevance. A major aim is to identify policy opportunities for improving support for children and their families and for early intervention and prevention strategies.

DESCRIPTION

The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) is an ongoing study for tracking children’s development in Australia. It follows the development of 10,000 children born in the late 1990's and 2000's and their families from all parts of Australia. The study follows two cohorts families with 4-5 year old children and families with 0-1 year old infants in 2004. The study will continue to follow these two cohorts of children to the ages of 14-15 years and 18-19 years.

DEFINITION OF FAMILY AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Information on family and domestic violence has not been directly collected within this survey both parents of a study child were asked the following questions:
  • Do you have arguments with your partner that end up with people pushing, hitting, kicking, or shoving?
  • Is there any anger and hostility between you and your partner?
  • Do you and your partner argue?

Aspects of family and domestic violence captured in the data are:
  • physical abuse; and
  • verbal abuse.

RELATIONSHIP TO DEFINING THE DATA CHALLENGE FOR FAMILY, DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE (cat. no. 4529.0)

The summary table below is designed to indicate the amount of information available for each of the six elements outlined in Defining the Data Challenge for Family, Domestic and Sexual Violence, 2013 (cat. no. 4529.0).This is a subjective assessment made by the ABS about the data collected and is not an indication of data quality.

Conceptual Framework
Amount of Information Available
Element/Sub–element
Some
Detailed
Context
Environmental factors
Psycho-social factors
Risk
Community prevalence
Community incidence
Incident/event
Responses
Formal responses
Informal responses
Impacts/Outcomes
Programs, Research & Evaluation
FAMILY AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RELATED CONTENT (data items collected)

The following tables provide a detailed analysis of the availability of specified data elements in the data source. The data items have been grouped into four counting units:
1. Context;
2. Person;
3. Incident/Event; and
4. Transaction.

Tables are absent from the entry in cases where the data source contains no data items which relate to the particular counting unit/s.

Context

Please note: This data source does not contain any data items relevant to this counting unit. Person
Data Items
Respondent
(Victim)1
Perpetrator 1
Secondary
(Victim)1
Residential location
Age
Sex
Indigenous status
Disability status
Country of birth
Language spoken
Employment status
Education
Income
Socio-economic status
Mental illness
2
2
Other: smoking
2
2
[1] Respondent may or may not have experienced family and domestic violence. Information on whether the respondent is the victim or perpetrator is unavailable.
[2] Information collected from respondents who reported having arguments with each other that resulted in pushing, hitting, kicking or shoving.Incident/event

Data Items
Available
Location of incident/event
Residential location
Workplace
Educational institution
Public Place
Other Location
Relationship between parties
Current partner
Previous partner
Boyfriend/girlfriend/date
Parent
Child
Sibling
Other relatives
Other member of household
Personal/financial dependency
Other
Other Characteristics
Weapon used
Type of weapon
Physical injury sustained
Type of injury sustained
Pregnancy
Alcohol/substance use
1
Prior history of victimisation/offending
Change to routine
Time off work/economic costs
Perceptions of behaviour as criminal
Other (child's: school attendance; behaviour; and achievements)
[1] Information collected from respondents who reported having arguments with each other that resulted in pushing, hitting, kicking or shoving.Transaction

Please note: This data source does not contain any data items relevant to this counting unit.

COLLECTION METHODOLOGY

The sample was selected from the Medicare enrolment database held by the Health Insurance Commission. The Health Insurance Commission selected children of the appropriate ages and sent an 'invitation to participate' letter to the Medicare cardholder, along with a brochure on Growing Up in Australia. Families had four weeks to register their withdrawal from the study. At the end of this period, remaining families were sent a letter indicating when an interviewer will be in their area. Interviewers subsequently contacted families to arrange an appointment.

The infant cohort comprised 5106 children aged 3-15 months at the start of the study (2004). The child cohort comprised 4984 children aged 4-5 years at the start of the study (2004).

Field interviewers conduct both face-to-face and telephone interviews with the study child’s parents and face-to-face interviews with the study child. The responses were entered onto a laptop computer. In 2010, the parents and study children also did part of the interview by entering their responses using a laptop. The study child’s teacher, carer and other resident parent (known as Parent 2) were required to complete paper questionnaires. Parents who do not live with the study child were also included in the study and interviewed by telephone.

SCOPE/TARGET POPULATION

Population comprises children who were aged 3-17 months in 2003-2004 and children who were aged 4-5 in 2003-2004.

COVERAGE

Children in remote locations were excluded.

DATA AVAILABILITY / DISSEMINATION

Publications available on line. Access to datasets may also be available for non-profit purposes at the discretion of the Longitudinal Surveys Business Owner, a position held by the Branch Manager of the Research and Analysis Branch in the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA). More details about how to apply for access are at: http://www.aifs.gov.au/growingup/data/dataaccess.html

PUBLICATIONS

A list of publications from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) is available on the AIFS website http://www.aifs.gov.au/growingup/pubs/index.html

COLLECTION HISTORY

Collection commenced: November 2004

Break in series: No

Other details: n/a

OTHER DIRECTORY DATA SOURCES HELD BY THIS AGENCY

Australian Temperament Project (ATP)
Evaluation of the 2006 Family Law Reforms Legislation and Courts Project, Australia
Longitudinal Study of Separated Families (LSSF)
Survey of Family Relationship Service Clients, 2009