4530.0 - Crime Victimisation, Australia, 2012-13 Quality Declaration 
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 12/02/2014   
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CONTRIBUTION OF ALCOHOL OR ANY OTHER SUBSTANCE TO ASSAULT

Since the 2010-11 Crime Victimisation Survey, victims of physical assault and face-to-face threatened assault have been asked whether they believed alcohol or any other substance contributed to their most recent incident of assault. Endnote 1

TO WHAT EXTENT DID VICTIMS BELIEVE THAT ALCOHOL OR ANY OTHER SUBSTANCE CONTRIBUTE TO INCIDENTS OF PHYSICAL ASSAULT AND FACE-TO-FACE THREATENED ASSAULT IN THE 12 MONTHS PRIOR TO INTERVIEW IN 2012-13?

Nationally, 65% of victims of physical assault believed that alcohol or any other substance contributed to their most recent incident (Data cube 3, Table 11). This included:

  • 67% of male victims
  • 62% of female victims
  • Nearly three-quarters of victims aged 20 to 24 years (74%)
  • 82% of victims whose most recent incident occurred at a place of entertainment/recreation.

Nationally, 55% of victims of face-to-face threatened assault believed that alcohol or any other substance contributed to their most recent incident (Data cube 3, Table 11). This included:
  • 58% of male victims
  • 52% of female victims
  • Two-thirds of victims aged 20 to 24 years (66%)
  • 82% of victims whose most recent incident occurred at a place of entertainment/recreation.

HAVE VICTIMS' BELIEFS ABOUT WHETHER ALCOHOL OR ANY OTHER SUBSTANCE CONTRIBUTED TO INCIDENTS OF PHYSICAL ASSAULT AND FACE-TO-FACE THREATENED ASSAULT CHANGED SINCE 2010-11?

There has been no significant change between 2012-13 and either 2011-12 or 2010-11 in the proportion of victims of physical and face-to-face threatened assault who believed that alcohol or any other substance contributed to their most recent incident of assault. Proportions for previous surveys are available in the 2010-11 and 2011-12 issues of Crime Victimisation, Australia (cat. no. 4530.0) respectively.

ENDNOTE

1 While this question was asked of all respondents aged 15 years and over, data has only been published for those 18 years and over. The responses of respondents aged 15 to 17 years may have been provided by a proxy respondent (such as a parent) and as this is a perception based question it was not asked of proxies. See Data Collection section of the Explanatory Notes for more information.