4125.0 - Gender Indicators, Australia, Aug 2015  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 25/08/2015   
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HEALTH


LATEST HIGHLIGHTS

The Health section contains the following sub-topics:
  • Health Status
  • Deaths
  • Risk Factors
  • Services



Gap between male and female death rates from selected causes is declining.

Data for 2013 from the ABS Causes of Death collection shows that males are one and a half times more likely than females to die from cancer (211 compared with 135 standardised deaths per 100,000 males and females respectively).

Between 2004 and 2013, death rates from cancer declined for both males and females, along with the gap between the two. Over this period, the male death rate had dropped by 26 deaths per 100,000 males. The female rate had dropped by 12 deaths per 100,000 females. This resulted in a decline in the gap between males and females from 90 to 76 standardised deaths per 100,000 males/ females respectively.

In 2013, males were almost twice as likely as females to die from Ischaemic heart disease (94 compared with 50 standardised deaths per 100,000 males and females respectively).

However, between 2004 and 2013 death rates from Ischaemic heart disease had dropped by 57 deaths per 100,000 males and 36 deaths per 100,000 females. This resulted in a decline in the gap between males and females from 65 to 44 deaths per 100,000 males/ females respectively.

Graph Image for Death Rate (a)(b) from Cancer, Ischaemic Heart and Cerebrovascular Disease, 2004 to 2013

Footnote(s): (a) Rates have been age standardised to the 2001 Australian standard population to account for differences in the age structure of the population over time. Standardised death rates (SDRs) are expressed per 100,000 males and females of the Estimated Resident Population (ERP) as at 30 June of that year. (b) Deaths per 100,000 of the Estimated Resident Population (ERP) of the same age and sex as at 30 June of the year. (c) Data are presented for 0 year olds onwards, representing when cancer becomes a consistant cause of death. (d) Data are presented for 25–34 year olds onward, representing when ischaemic heart disease becomes a consistant leading cause of death. (e) Data are presented for 45–54 year olds onward, representing when cerebrovascular disease becomes a consistant leading cause of death. (f) Data between 2006 and 2009 are for all males and all females 85 to 94 years of age, but data between 2000 and 2005 are for all males and all females 85 years and over.

Source(s): ABS Causes of Death, Australia, 2013



In 2013, the suicide rate for males was at least three times higher than females (16 compared to five standardised deaths per 100,000 males and females respectively). However, since 2004 the gap declined from 13 to 11 deaths per 100,000 males/ females respectively.

It was a similar story for death rates from motor vehicle accidents. In 2013 male rates were nearly three times higher than females (eight compared with three standardised deaths per 100,000 males and females respectively). But since 2004 the gap declined from approximately eight to five deaths per 100,000 males/ females respectively.

Graph Image for Death Rate (a)(b) from Suicide, Motor Vehicles and Drugs, 2004 to 2013

Footnote(s): (a) Rates have been age standardised to the 2001 Australian standard population to account for differences in the age structure of the population over time. Standardised death rates (SDRs) are expressed per 100,000 males and females of the Estimated Resident Population (ERP) as at 30 June of that year. (b) Deaths per 100,000 of the Estimated Resident Population (ERP) of the same age and sex as at 30 June of the year. (c) Care needs to be taken in interpreting figures relating to suicide. For more information see Explanatory Notes 87-93 in ABS Causes of Death, Australia, 2013 (cat. no. 3303.0). (d) For more information on the list of ICD-10 codes that contribute to the definition of drug induced deaths see Appendix 2: Tabulation of Selected Causes of Death in ABS Causes of Death, Australia, 2013 (cat. no. 3303.0).

Source(s): ABS Causes of Death, Australia, 2013




DATA VISUALISATION

A visual representation of the Overweight and Obesity rate from the Health domain is shown below. Simply go to the graph and click on the 'Play' button to see changes in the data over time.

Details of the data used to create the graphs, and the original data sources, can be found in the relevant Data Cubes on the Downloads tab.

Graph Image for Overweight and Obesity Rate, by Sex and Age