4720.0 - National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey: User Guide, 2014-15  
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SOCIAL CONTACT, NETWORKS AND CHILD SPORTS


Overview

This chapter provides information on the following topics:


Social contact

The 2014–15 NATSISS collected information on community participation for people aged 3 years and over. People were asked about their involvement in any physical, sporting, community or social activities in the 12 months prior to interview. For children aged 3–14 years, this information was provided by a proxy. Response categories included:

Community or interest groups
  • recreational group or cultural group activities;
  • attended a native title meeting;
  • community or special interest group activities;
  • church or religious activities.

Social activities
  • went out to a cafe, restaurant or bar;
  • visited library, museum or art gallery;
  • attended movies;
  • attended theatre or concert;
  • visited park, botanic gardens, zoo or theme park;
  • watched Indigenous TV;
  • listened to Indigenous radio; and
  • none of these.

Sporting activities
  • played sport or took part in physical activities;
  • coach, instructor or teacher;
  • referee, umpire or official;
  • committee member or administrator;
  • attended sporting event as a spectator;
  • other sporting activity; and
  • none of these.

More than one response was allowed. People aged 15 years who said they had played sport or taken part in physical activities were asked what type of organised sport(s) or physical activities they had played or trained for in the 12 months prior to interview. Response categories included:
  • Australian rules football;
  • walking/jogging/running/fitness/gym;
  • basketball;
  • netball (indoor and outdoor);
  • cricket (indoor and outdoor);
  • hockey;
  • softball/baseball;
  • cycling/BMXing;
  • dancing/ballet;
  • golf;
  • martial arts;
  • rugby/rugby league;
  • soccer (indoor and outdoor);
  • swimming/diving/other water sports;
  • tennis (indoor and outdoor); and
  • other.

More than one response could be provided.

Comparison to the 2008 NATSISS

In 2008, the question about involvement in any physical, sporting, community or social activities in the 12 months prior to interview included the category 'attended funerals, ceremonies or Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander festivals'. In 2014–15, this category was removed from the question. This information was collected in the Language and culture topic in the question about involvement in cultural events, ceremonies or organisations, and is included in the following Social contact output data items:
  • Whether participated in selected sporting, social or community activities in last 12 months;
  • Types of selected sporting, social or community activities participated in last 12 months; and
  • Number of selected sporting, social or community activities participated in last 12 months.

The following information relating to people aged 3 years and over was collected in 2008, but was not collected in 2014–15:
  • Whether participated in sporting, social or community activities in last 3 months;
  • Types of sporting, social or community activities participated in last 3 months; and
  • Number of sporting, social or community activities participated in last 3 months.

The following information relating to children aged 3–14 years was collected in 2008, but was not collected in 2014–15:
  • Whether child tends to play by themselves;
  • Frequency child plays with children same age; and
  • Frequency child plays with older children.

The information on adult participation in organised sport or physical activities was collected for the first time in the 2014–15 NATSISS and data is unable to be compared to 2008.

Social networks

Information on social networks was collected for people aged 15 years and over, and covers two main themes:
  • contact with family and friends; and
  • whether people had friends or family they could confide in.

Contact with family and friends

People were asked about the frequency and type of contact they had with family and friends who did not live with them. Information on the frequency of face to face contact was collected by asking respondents if they had seen family or friends who do not live with them, either:
  • everyday;
  • in the week prior to interview;
  • in the month prior to interview; or
  • in the three months prior to interview.

People who responded that they had no family or friends were not asked any further questions about social networks.

People were asked if they had made any of the following types of contact with family or friends who did not live with them, in the three months prior to interview. Response categories included:
  • voice calls (mobile, fixed telephone, internet);
  • text messaging;
  • calls made using a video link (e.g. Skype);
  • web based chat, including phone applications;
  • mail/post;
  • email;
  • other; and
  • no contact.

More than one response could be provided.

For each type of contact reported, people were asked about the frequency of the contact in the three months prior to interview. Response categories included:
  • every day;
  • at least once a week;
  • at least once a month; and
  • at least once a quarter.

Family and friends to confide in

People were asked about family and friends they could confide in. The aim of these questions was to give an indication of the depth and quality of relationships, and the availability of emotional support.

People aged 15 years and over were asked whether they had any friends or family members (not living with them) who they felt they could confide in. In remote areas, people were asked if they had any friends or family members (not living with them) who they could tell secrets to. People who had friends or family members they could confide in were asked how many, based on the following:
  • 1 to 2;
  • 3 to 4; or
  • 5 or more.

Comparison to the 2008 NATSISS

Between 2008 and 2014–15 the information on contact with family and friends (other than face-to-face contact) has been revised. The response categories for the types of contact people may have had were updated to reflect the increase in use of mobile phones and the internet. Additionally, in 2008, the types of contact (other than face-to-face contact) were grouped into three categories, and the frequency of contact was collected for these broad groups, rather than for each type.

Detailed information on how this information was collected in the 2008 NATSISS can be found in the Social capital chapter of National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey: Users' Guide, 2008 (cat. no. 4720.0). The 2008 NATSISS questionnaire and Data item list can be accessed via the Downloads tab.

In 2008, information on whether people could confide in friends or family members living outside the household was collected separately, for friends, and for family. This information was combined in 2014–15.

The following information relating to people aged 15 years and over was collected in 2008, but was not collected in 2014–15:
  • Proportion of friends of a similar age;
  • Proportion of Indigenous friends; and
  • Proportion of friends with similar education levels.
    Child sports

    Information was collected on the physical activities and participation in organised sport by children aged 4–14 years. The child's proxy was asked how many days in the week prior to interview the child was physically active for a total time of at least 60 minutes. Physically active meant the child did an activity of moderate to vigorous intensity. This did not need to be continuous time, but could be made up of shorter bursts of activity. Responses were based on the following:
    • no days;
    • 1 day;
    • 2 days;
    • 3 days;
    • 4 days;
    • 5-6 days;
    • every day; or
    • don't know.

    The proxies of children aged 4–14 years were asked whether the child had played or trained for any organised sport, through either a club or school in the 12 months prior to interview. If the child was currently at school, then this activity was specified as being undertaken outside school hours. If the child did not participate or it was unknown if they had participated, the proxy was sequenced to later questions on barriers to participation. If a child had participated in sport they were asked to nominate the types of sport they had played or trained for, from the following list:
    • Australian rules football;
    • athletics/track and field;
    • basketball (indoor and outdoor);
    • cricket (indoor and outdoor);
    • cycling/BMXing;
    • dance;
    • gymnastics;
    • hockey;
    • martial arts;
    • netball (indoor and outdoor);
    • rugby/rugby league;
    • soccer (indoor and outdoor);
    • softball/baseball;
    • swimming;
    • tennis;
    • touch football; and
    • other.

    More than one response could be provided. If a child had participated in less than four organised sports, they were asked about barriers to participation. The child's proxy was asked what stops the child from playing/playing more organised sport, based on the following:
    • doesn't want to do any(more) sport;
    • too young for preferred sport;
    • more organised sport is not available;
    • health reasons;
    • costs too much;
    • lack of appropriate training or equipment;
    • not enough time;
    • preferred sport is seasonal;
    • transport problems/too far;
    • other; and
    • don't know.

    More than one response could be provided.

    The proxies of children aged 4–14 years who had participated in organised sports in the 12 months prior to interview were also asked how many hours in the previous two weeks the child spent playing or training outside school hours for all organised sports. A response of 0 to 336 hours was possible, where 0 represented less than one hour or no time.

    Comparison to the 2008 NATSISS

    In 2008, the question about barriers to sport participation was asked where a child had participated in fewer than three organised sports in the previous 12 months. In 2014–15, the barriers question was asked about children who participated in fewer than four organised sports.

    Between 2008 and 2014–15, there were minor revisions to the response categories for the types of organised sport a child may have participated in and the barriers to participation. In 2008 the response categories were:

    Types of organised sport
    • swimming;
    • soccer (outdoor);
    • soccer (indoor);
    • netball;
    • tennis;
    • basketball;
    • Australian rules football;
    • cricket (outdoor);
    • cricket (indoor);
    • martial arts;
    • athletics/track and field;
    • rugby league;
    • gymnastics;
    • hockey; and
    • other.

    Barriers to participation
    • don't want to do any/more sport;
    • (more) organised sport is not available;
    • health reasons;
    • costs too much;
    • lack of appropriate training or equipment;
    • not enough time;
    • preferred sport is seasonal;
    • other; or
    • don't know.

    In 2008, information was collected on whether children aged 5–14 years usually spend more than 2 hours per day being inactive. This information was not collected in 2014–15.