1001.0 - Australian Bureau of Statistics - Annual Report, 2018-19  
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Management of human resources

Introduction

The ABS human resource (HR) management function is a key enabler for ensuring the ABS has the right people in the right place at the right time, to meet Australia’s need for quality information to inform important decisions.

As at 30 June 2019, there were a total of 3,200 operative and inoperative staff employed by the ABS, including:

    • 2,652 operative staff employed under the Public Service Act 1999
    • 99 inoperative staff employed under the Public Service Act 1999
    • 440 operative interviewers employed under the Australian Bureau of Statistics Act 1975
    • 8 inoperative interviewers employed under the Australian Bureau of Statistics Act 1975
    • the Australian Statistician, by statutory appointment under the Australian Bureau of Statistics Act 1975.

Tables 7.1 to 7.8 provide a breakdown of ABS staffing levels as at 30 June 2019 and compare them with levels as at 30 June 2018. The tables include information on staff gender, employment type and status, classification, location, and diversity.


Table 7.1: Total ongoing employees by gender, location and employment status, at 30 June 2018 & 2019 (a)

At 30 June 2018
At 30 June 2019
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total

Location
Full-time
Part-time
Full-time
Part-time
Full-time
Part-time
Full-time
Part-time

NSW
77
41
60
84
262
81
46
59
88
274
Vic. (b)
221
31
184
110
546
225
39
173
130
568(c)
Qld
70
23
68
71
232
66
23
54
82
225
SA
64
25
70
73
232
68
27
71
83
249
WA
51
16
25
59
151
49
21
34
65
169
Tas.
40
11
32
41
124
41
13
38
42
134
ACT
463
42
420
135
1060
461
50
412
134
1058(c)
NT
7
7
9
14
37
6
7
11
17
41

Total
993
196
868
587
2644
997
226
852
641
2718(c)

(a) Counts include the Australian Statistician, interviewers and inoperative staff.
(b) Includes staff located in offices in Dandenong, Geelong and Melbourne.
(c) Includes sex indeterminate staff: 1 in Vic and 1 in the ACT. Total (ongoing and non-ongoing) sex indeterminate staff in 2018-19 was 3.


Table 7.2: Total non-ongoing employees by gender, location and employment status, at 30 June 2018 & 2019 (a)

At 30 June 2018
At 30 June 2019

Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total

Full-time
Part-time
Full-time
Part-time
Full-time
Part-time
Full-time
Part-time

NSW
7
17
4
15
43
6
3
4
2
15
Vic. (b)
54
59
67
109
289
51
47
61
74
233
Qld
10
5
10
18
43
4
5
3
4
16
SA
11
1
12
2
26
18
3
14
3
38
WA
26
15
42
9
92
16
3
8
2
29
Tas.
2
0
2
1
5
3
0
2
1
6
ACT
49
17
34
12
112
61
19
54
10
145(c)
NT
0
2
1
3
6
0
0
0
0
0

Total
159
116
172
169
616
159
80
146
96
482(c)

(a) Counts include interviewers and inoperative staff.
(b) Includes staff located in offices in Dandenong, Geelong and Melbourne.
(c) Includes sex indeterminate staff: 1 in ACT. Total (ongoing and non-ongoing) sex indeterminate staff in 2018-19 was 3.


Table 7.3: Ongoing Public Service Act employees by gender, classification and employment status, at 30 June 2018 & 2019 (a) (b) (c)

At 30 June 2018
At 30 June 2019

Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total

Classification
Full-time
Part-time
Full-time
Part-time
Full-time
Part-time
Full-time
Part-time

SES 3
1
0
2
0
3
1(e)
0
3
0
4
SES 2
4
0
6(d)
0
10
5
0
6(e)
0
11
SES 1
17(d)
0
15
1(d)
33
17(e)
0
12(e)
2(e)
31
EL 2
75
3
41
10
129(d)
75
2
48
14
139(e)
EL 1
201
25
154
75
455(d)
196
26
157
80
459(e)
APS 6
285
19
239
110
653(d)
308
23
240
122
693(e)
APS 5
177
14
203
82
476(d)
198
13
221
88
520(e)
APS 4
206
10
183
33
432(d)
164
15
131
35
347(e)(f)
APS 3
25
0
23
7
55(d)
28
0
30
5
63
APS 2
1
1
1
0
3
1
1
1
0
3
APS 1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Other (g)
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
3
0
6

Total
992
72
867
318
2249
996
80
852
346
2276(f)

(a) Includes all operative and inoperative ABS staff employed under the Public Service Act 1999.
(b) Excludes the Australian Statistician and interviewers.
(c) Counts are based on nominal classification.
(d) 2018 includes 99 inoperative ongoing staff (by level: SESB2 – 2 female; SESB1 – 1 male & 1 female; EL2 – 2 male & 4 female; EL1 – 3 male & 17 female; APS6 – 7 male & 32 female; APS5 – 1 male & 17 female; APS4 – 1 male & 10 female; APS3 – 1 male).
(e) 2019 includes 98 inoperative ongoing staff (by level: SESB3 – 1 male; SESB2 – 2 female; SESB1 – 1 male & 2 female; EL2 – 4 male & 3 female; EL1 – 5 male & 17 female; APS6 – 3 male & 24 female; APS5 – 5 male & 17 female; APS4 – 3 male & 10 female; APS3 – 1 female).
(f) Includes sex indeterminate staff: 2 APS4 staff. Total (ongoing and non-ongoing) sex indeterminate staff in 2018-19 was 3.
(g) All staff included in the ‘Other’ category in 2018-19 were cadets.


Table 7.4: Non-ongoing Public Service Act employees by gender, classification and employment status, at 30 June 2018 & 2019 (a)(b)(c)

At 30 June 2018
At 30 June 2019

Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total

Classification
Full-time
Part-time
Full-time
Part-time
Full-time
Part-time
Full-time
Part-time

SES 3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
SES 2
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
SES 1
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
EL 2
3
1
3
1
8
3
2
1
2
8
EL 1
3
4
2
2
11
12
5
4
3
24
APS 6
20
7
8
3
38
29
9
13
1
52(d)
APS 5
17
2
18
4
41
14
0
19
4
37
APS 4
80
6
80
8
174
68
5
72
15
160
APS 3
22
6
26
12
66
27
7
33
12
80(e)
APS 2
1
46
0
77
124
4
51
4
53
112
APS 1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Other
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Total
148
72
137
107
464
159
79
146
90
475(e)

(a) Includes all operative and inoperative ABS staff employed under the Public Service Act 1999.
(b) Excludes interviewers.
(c) Counts are based on nominal classification.
(d) 2019 includes 1 inoperative non-ongoing female APS6.
(e) Includes sex indeterminate staff: 1 APS3. Total (ongoing and non-ongoing) sex indeterminate staff in 2018-19 was 3.


Table 7.5: Public Service Act employees by location and employment type, at 30 June 2018 & 2019 (a)(b)

At 30 June 2018(c)
At 30 June 2019(d)

Location
Ongoing
Non-ongoing
Total
Ongoing
Non-ongoing
Total

NSW
165
12
177
169
14
183
Vic. (e)
473
247
720
478
231
709
Qld
171
14
185
158
13
171
SA
181
17
198
196
38
234
WA
102
66
168
116
28
144
Tas.
98
4
102
102
6
108
ACT
1041
104
1145
1038
145
1183
NT
18
0
18
19
0
19

Total
2249
464
2713
2276
475
2751

(a) Includes all operative and inoperative ABS staff employed under the Public Service Act 1999.
(b) Excludes the Australian Statistician and interviewers.
(c) Includes 99 inoperative ongoing staff at 30 June 2018.
(d) Includes 98 inoperative ongoing staff and 1 inoperative non-ongoing staff at 30 June 2019.
(e) Includes staff located in offices in Dandenong, Geelong and Melbourne.


Table 7.6: Number of interviewers by location and employment type, at 30 June 2018 & 2019 (a)

At 30 June 2018(c)
At 30 June 2019(d)

Location
Ongoing
Non-ongoing
Total
Ongoing
Non-ongoing
Total

NSW
97
31
128
105
1
106
Vic.
73
42
115
90
2
92
Qld
61
29
90
67
3
70
SA
51
9
60
53
0
53
WA
49
26
75
53
1
54
Tas.
26
1
27
32
0
32
ACT
18
8
26
19
0
19
NT
19
6
25
22
0
22

Total
394
152
546
441
7
448

(a) Includes all operative and inoperative interviewers.
(b) Includes 4 inoperative ongoing interviewers at 30 June 2018.
(c) Includes 8 inoperative ongoing interviewers at 30 June 2019.


ABS workforce strategy

The ABS Workforce Strategy 2015–2019 provides a strategic outlook for transforming our workforce and driving high performance. It complements the ABS Corporate Plan and focuses exclusively on the workforce culture and capability. A revised Workforce Strategy is being developed in 2019 to reflect updated ABS strategic priorities.

ABS workforce planning

Workforce planning ensures the ABS can respond to both external and internal changes in its operating environment. At the strategic level, the ABS workforce plan considers talent management, succession planning, employee engagement and organisational and cultural change.

Workforce planning supports the dynamic nature of the ABS work program by ensuring the organisation has the capabilities required to deliver economic and social indicators that support national decision making and inform policy development. As we move to the next phase of our ongoing transformation, workforce plans are being reviewed to focus on building capabilities to support emerging priorities in the areas of information leadership and the delivery of innovative new statistical services

Shaping the culture of the ABS

Since 2015, the ABS has identified organisational culture as one of six critical success factors for organisational transformation. The inclusion of organisational culture was in response to a number of independent reviews which called for cultural change to position the ABS for the future, with a shift to become a more open, engaged and outward-looking agency, working in partnership with others. In 2017, the ABS developed a culture change strategy and conducted a benchmark assessment of its actual and desired future culture using the Organisational Culture Inventory (OCI). This work culminated in the development of ‘ABS: Our Culture 2018–2021’ – a statement which outlines organisational expectations and articulates associated high-performance behaviours.

Leaders have particular responsibility to demonstrate and encourage behaviour that reinforces our cultural intent at all times. ABS SES officers and Directors have committed to uphold this responsibility and embody behaviours that lead to high performance in individuals and teams.

In 2018–19 the Australian Statistician drove leader-led culture change through a range of activities, including:

    • executive leadership coaching, workshops, interviews and 360-degree feedback assessments
    • regular leadership summits themed around the desired behaviours articulated in the ‘ABS: Our Culture 2018–2021’ statement
    • culture action sessions with staff at all levels to identify and act on data-driven local culture change initiatives
    • identification of high performance EL2 behaviours and routines which have been shared with staff and are expected to be displayed across the ABS
    • embedding high performance behaviours, aligned with our cultural aspirations, in the ABS’ new Job Design model.

An evaluation of the culture change work indicates the SES feel well prepared to lead the cultural element of ABS Transformation. Results from the 2018 APS Employee Census indicated improvements in both the internal satisfaction with the organisation’s culture and the processes in place to support this change.

The ABS will repeat the OCI process in 2019 to track progress towards our preferred culture. We will also continue our commitment to recognising behaviours that support the ongoing culture change, via our Recognition Program.


Workplace diversity and inclusion in the ABS

In August 2018, the ABS launched its first ABS Inclusion and Diversity Strategy 2018–21 which sets out our intention to continue to create workplaces that better reflect our community, are more inclusive and benefit from the diverse skills, perspectives and experiences of our employees. The strategy recognises that our people are key to fulfilling the ABS’ purpose and successfully transforming our organisation.

The Australian Statistician, David W. Kalisch, continued to drive inclusion and diversity initiatives in his role as a Male Champion of Change for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) by signing up to the Male Champions of Change Impact Report 2018. This is the first consolidated review of the strategy to accelerate the advancement of women in leadership and achieve gender equality.

Fostering inclusion

To support our commitment to be an inclusive and diverse organisation, some highlights from 2018–19 have included:

    • launching the ABS Reconciliation Action Plan 2018–2021 (RAP) with our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employee network (Youmpla)
    • creating a new role to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment and Development programs within the ABS
    • implementing Disability Confident Managers, Disability Confident Workforce and SBS Cultural Competence Program (CCP) e-learning modules
    • conducting training for SES staff in becoming ‘LGBTI+ Allies’
    • implementing a Reasonable Workplace Adjustments (RWA) passport and RWA employee and manager guides to provide support for people with disability
    • launching the first employee ‘My Story – Talking Disability and Mental Health’ which is available to all staff via an Inclusion and Diversity on-demand video library
    • participating, partnering and utilising a range of diverse recruitment activities and strategies aimed at making our workforce more representative of the Australian population.


Multicultural access and equity

The ABS is committed to improving engagement and responding to the needs of Australians from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Strategies and policies are developed that are inclusive, and specific engagement strategies are developed as required.

For example, the upcoming 2021 Census program has employed Inclusive Strategy Managers to ensure appropriate stakeholder engagement with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) communities and accurate counting of communities during the forthcoming Census.

ABS workforce diversity profile

Table 7.7 provides a breakdown of the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people employed in the ABS. Table 7.8 indicates the number of staff identifying as having a disability.


Table 7.7: Public Service Act Indigenous employees by employment type, at 30 June 2018 & 2019 (a) (b)

At 30 June 2018
At 30 June 2019

Ongoing
23
25
Non-ongoing
2
2

Total
25
27

(a) Includes all operative and inoperative staff employed under the Public Service Act 1999.
(b) Excludes interviewers.


Table 7.8: Number of Public Service Act employees identifying as having a disability by employment type, at 30 June 2018 & 2019 (a) (b)

At 30 June 2018
At 30 June 2019

Ongoing
59
61
Non-ongoing
2
5

Total
61
66

(a) Includes all operative and inoperative staff employed under the Public Service Act 1999.
(b) Excludes interviewers.

Disability reporting mechanism

The National Disability Strategy 2010–2020 sets out a ten-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. The ABS contributes to the whole-of-government two-yearly report which tracks progress against each of the six outcome areas of the Strategy and presents a picture of how people with disability are faring. This report can be found at www.dss.gov.au.

Since 2007–08, the Australian Public Service Commission (APSC) has reported at a whole-of-government level in relation to disability via the State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available at www.apsc.gov.au.

Training and development

In line with the ABS Workforce Strategy 2015–2019, the ABS is reshaping its workforce capability to ensure we have the right people with the right skills to achieve transformation.

Key achievements in 2018–19

    • Forty three graduates commenced the 2019 ABS Graduate Development Program. This program supports graduates to quickly build professional capability and includes workshops, seminars, group projects and SES shadowing opportunities. This year, the ABS ranked 16th in the Top 100 Graduate Employers list produced by the GradAustralia Student Survey (up from 17th in 2018).
    • To support a blended learning model, the ABS hosts a range of eLearning programs on its internal Learning Management System (LMS). The suite of programs includes induction and mandatory training, statistical capability courses, systems training, as well leadership and management courses. Based on data extracted from the LMS, across the 2018–19 financial year, approximately 7,300 hours of this learning was completed by ABS staff. Of these hours, approximately 6,080 were dedicated to induction and mandatory training.
    • Online learning was also made available to ABS staff through the external provider, Lynda.com. Across the 2018–19 financial year, 1,842 hours of online learning was undertaken by staff, around a wide range of topics. The courses that were most accessed were based around Microsoft Excel, project management, and programming.
    • Face to face courses on leadership and management (including adaptive leadership, leading teams through change, personal efficiency and coaching for performance) were delivered across the year to ABS staff representing a total of 440 training days. Over 700 ABS staff took part in the Management Fundamentals face-to-face training courses.
    • New diagnostic assessment tools were introduced to strengthen people leadership and management capabilities across the ABS. These included Hermann Brain Dominance Instrument (HBDI) and Life Styles Inventory (LSI). Investment was made in internal capability development, offering these tools in-house. In excess of 250 staff have engaged with these tools and have been able to use the results to improve communication, decision making and problem solving skills.

Recruitment

The efficiency and effectiveness of the ABS depends on attracting and retaining the right people.


Key achievements in 2018–19

In 2018–19 ABS recruitment processes included recruitment of:

    • 42 graduates, who commenced the Graduate Development Program in February 2019
    • 152 ongoing engagements (with 74 of these being ABS non-ongoing employees who accepted an ongoing position)
    • 279 new temporary staff
    • 289 promotions
    • 58 ongoing Field Interviewers and 131 Community Advisors across Australia.

Workplace health and safety

The ABS is committed to fostering a proactive and collaborative approach to the management of work health, safety and wellbeing in the workplace. Specialist teams of work health and safety (WHS) advisors and rehabilitation specialists focus on wellbeing at work, preventing injury and illness, early intervention if injury or illness occurs, and rehabilitation and return to work programs.

The ABS’ specialist teams work alongside the ABS People Committee, and multiple ABS Health and Safety Committees, to design and implement health and wellbeing initiatives and regulate WHS policy and guidelines. A significant achievement in 2018–19 was the 68% reduction in workers’ compensation premium costs (Table 7.9). The reduced premium rate was achieved through proactive and person-centred services for maintaining employee health at work, early return to work, and durable return to work.

Workplace health and safety regulation

There are a number of specific WHS roles in the ABS filled by trained staff. These include First Aid Officers, Health and Safety Representatives (HSRs) and wardens. These positions have remained occupied with appropriately skilled and trained ABS employees over the period 2018–19.

The ABS has one national, one field-based and eight site-based Health and Safety Committees. These committees met quarterly as required in 2018–19, and in addition to business as usual items, consulted on and finalised a new Work Health and Safety Statement of Commitment.

Provisional Improvement Notices, investigations and inspections

There were no Provisional Improvement Notices (PINs) issued by Health and Safety Representatives (HSRs) under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (WHS Act). Further, there were no improvement notices issued by Comcare (the regulator) under the WHS Act during the period.

Under the WHS Act, the ABS is required to report all ‘notifiable incidents’ that occur in the course of conducting ABS business. A notifiable incident is defined as: a death of a person, a serious illness or injury, or a dangerous incident. The ABS reported one notifiable incident in the period and one safety investigation completed.

The ABS has worked collaboratively with Comcare implementing improved practices to reduce the risk of workplace injury and to reduce workers’ compensation claim numbers and duration. A Comcare verification inspection was finalised.

Rehabilitation and workers’ compensation

The ABS Comcare premium rate for 2018–19 was 0.74% of total salary (excluding GST) (Table 7.9). The 2018–19 premium figure represents a 68% reduction from 2017–18.

Table 7.9: Comcare workers’ compensation premium rate, 2014-15 to 2018-19

2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18
2018-19

ABS premium rate (percentage of total salary)
2.46
2.21
2.2
1.59
0.74

Overall scheme premium rate
1.93
1.85
1.72
1.23
0.85

The ABS Rehabilitation Management System (RMS) is the framework for achieving rehabilitation objectives and compliance with the Comcare scheme. The RMS has been the subject of continuous improvement, with the planned corrective action closed early in 2019. Further to this, the internal audit program returned a 95% compliance result.

Responsive management of rehabilitation has seen a high rate of application of Early Intervention (EI) strategies in 42 cases in order to manage the risk of compensation liability. Outside this, the ABS has had five claims for workers’ compensation accepted by Comcare with a date of injury occurring during the 2018–19 financial year. An additional three claims made by ABS employees were disallowed by Comcare.

Of the claims where liability was accepted by the insurer (Comcare), there were three injury claims (2 lodged by ABS interviewers and one by an office-based employee) and two disease claims (one ABS interviewer and one office-based employee).

Attendance management

In 2018–19, the average number of days of unscheduled absence per full-time equivalent (FTE) was 12 days (Table 7.10), a slight decrease from 2017–18.

Table 7.10: Unscheduled absence: days per FTE, 2016-17 to 2018-19 (a)(b)

2016-17
2017-18
2018-19

ABS
11.8
12.3
12
Australian Government (Large Agency) median
12.3
12.5
n/a(c)

(a) Excludes interviewers, non-ongoing Census Data Processing Centre staff, and Census field staff.
(b) Totals do not include workers compensation.
(c) The Australian Government (Large Agency) median for 2018-19 was not available at the time of preparing this report.


Workplace relations

Executive remuneration

Executive remuneration at the ABS refers to the remuneration of Key Management Personnel (KMP), Senior Executive Service (SES) employees, and Other Highly Paid Staff. Tables 7.11 and 7.12 outline the remuneration paid to KMP and SES employees. During the reporting period ending 30 June 2019, the ABS identified no other Highly Paid Staff.

The Australian Statistician determines the remuneration for all Senior Executive Service (SES) employees at the ABS. In determining SES remuneration arrangements, the Australian Statistician considers:

    • recommendations from the ABS SES Remuneration Committee
    • contemporary remuneration arrangements and pay relativities with reference to the wider Australian Public Service
    • the Australian Public Service Remuneration Survey (conducted by the Australian Public Service Commission)
    • individual performance
    • salary relative to other ABS SES employees
    • the position of individual salaries in the market.

The ABS SES Remuneration Committee makes recommendations to the Australian Statistician on SES Band 1 and 2 employment conditions and remuneration. The ABS SES Remuneration Committee is comprised of:
    • Deputy Australian Statistician, Statistical Services Group
    • Deputy Australian Statistician, Census and Data Services Group
    • Deputy Australian Statistician, Corporate Services and Transformation Group
    • General Manager, People, Capability and Communication Division.

Table 7.11: Information about remuneration for key management personnel, at 30 June 2019(a)

Short-term benefits
Post-employment benefits
Other long-term benefits
Termination benefits(b)
Total remuneration

NamePosition title
Base salary
Bonuses(b)
Other benefits and allowances(c)
Superannuation contributions
Long service leave
Other long-term benefits

David KalischAustralian Statistician
532,576
0
140,276
93,254
75,614
0
0
841,720
Jenet Connell(d)Deputy Australian Statistician
329,991
0
3,155
58,669
25,461
0
0
417,276
Luise McCullochDeputy Australian Statistician
386,688
0
3,723
64,966
24,958
0
0
480,335
Teresa DickinsonDeputy Australian Statistician
331,309
0
3,829
59,551
4,520
0
0
399,209

(a) KMP remuneration is prepared on an accrual basis as required under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (PGPA Rule) (PGPA Rule).
(b) In 2018-19, there were no bonuses nor termination benefits paid to KMP.
(c) Other benefits and allowances include car parking and related fringe benefits tax, and other allowances.
(d) Part-year - appointed 3 September 2018.

Table 7.12: Information about remuneration for senior executives (a)(b)(c)(d)

Short-term benefits (e)
Post-employment benefits
Other long-term benefits(f)
Termination benefits(g)
Total remuneration

Total remuneration bands
Number of senior executives
Average base salary
Average bonuses(h)
Average other benefits and allowances
Average superannuation contributions(i)
Average long service leave
Average other long-term benefits
Average termination benefits
Average total remuneration

$0- $220,000
18
93,538
0
3,437
20,421
5,539
0
-
122,935
$220,001- $245,000
7
182,682
0
5,700
33,779
11,321
0
-
233,482
$245,001- $270,000
16
194,106
0
2,149
35,062
13,982
0
11,587
256,886
$270,001- $295,000
4
222,003
0
2,836
39,896
15,914
0
-
280,649
$295,001- $320,000
1
232,903
0
2,065
43,049
17,657
0
-
295,674
$320,001- $345,000
2
263,845
0
2,118
48,181
25,760
0
-
339,904
$345,001- $370,000
3
266,922
0
17,967
44,217
22,180
0
-
351,287
$370,001- $395,000
3
247,380
0
2,135
41,774
20,098
0
66,583
377,972

(a) This table is prepared on an accrual basis as required under the PGPA Rule.
(b) In 2018-19, there were 26 fortnightly pays.
(c) This table reports the average total remuneration of Senior Executives who received remuneration during the reporting period.
(d) Those ABS officers that have been classified as Key Management Personnel (as per Table 7.9) have not been included in this table disclosure.
(e) The Short-term benefits is comprised of:
      1) the average of Base salary (including: paid and accrued; paid while on annual leave; paid while on sick leave; higher duties allowance; and purchased annual leave); and
      2) the average of Other benefits and allowances (motor vehicle allowance, car parking and related fringe benefits tax, and other allowances).
(f) The Other long-term benefits is the average amount of long services leave accrued and deferred (more than 12 months) for the reporting period. It also includes the average of any salary paid while on long services leave.
(g) The Termination benefits is the average amount of termination payment for the reporting period.
(h) In 2018-19, there were no bonuses paid to Senior Executives.
(i) The Superannuation contributions is the average of the ABS' superannuation contributions, including productivity component, for the reporting period.


Employment arrangements

Table 7.13 present the employment arrangements for the ABS staff employed under the Public Service Act 1999 as at 30 June 2019.

ABS interviewers are engaged under the Australian Bureau of Statistics Act 1975 in accordance with the Census and Statistics Regulation 2016. The ABS Interviewers Enterprise Agreement 2017 is the employment instrument that applies to ABS interviewers (448 as at 30 June 2019).


Table 7.13: ABS employment arrangements, at 30 June 2019 (a)

SES
Non-SES
Total

ABS employees covered by the Australian Bureau of Statistics Enterprise Agreement 2019
n/a
2,703
2,703

Individual Flexibility Arrangements (IFA) made under the Australian Bureau of Statistics Enterprise Agreement 2019 as at June 30 2019
n/a
9
9

SES employees covered by Determination under s. 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999 (Includes SES employees on long term leave, secondment and temporary transfer to other agencies)
48
0
48

Total
48
2,703
2,751

(a) The 9 employees with an IFA are included in the 2,703 ABS employees.

Salary arrangements

The ABS Enterprise Agreement 2019 outlines the salary arrangements for non-SES ABS employees employed under the Public Service Act 1999.

Table 7.14 shows the salary ranges for ABS employees at 30 June 2019.

Table 7.14: Salary ranges by classification as at 30 June 2019


Classification
Minimum ($)
Maximum ($)

SES 3
262,701
n/a (a)
SES 2
210,161
257,447
SES 1
168,129
204,907
EL 2
124,537
149,822 (b)
EL 1
99,756
115,316
APS 6
81,196
91,696
APS 5
72,279
81,188
APS 4
64,256
72,275
APS 3
56,955
64,202
APS 2
53,119
56,372
APS 1
43,719
49,994
Other - Graduate
58,587
72,275

Total
43,719
262,701(a)

(a) There is no maximum salary range for the SES 3 cohort.
(b) EL2 pay point 4 only accessible as detailed in clauses 15.1 and 15.2 of the ABS Enterprise Agreement 2019.

There are no performance pay arrangements in the ABS.


Performance management in the ABS

The ABS is committed to being a high performing public agency, promoting a people oriented culture through focus on leadership, communication, innovation and engagement.

Office-based staff

Where there are concerns about employee performance, specialist teams work with employees and managers, implementing early strategies to improve performance. Where concerns remain, ABS managers work with their employees by implementing an informal Performance Improvement Plan (PIP).

The ABS initiated three PIPs for ongoing office-based staff during 2018–19, with four in total completed in the period. Of these four, one employee improved performance, and one voluntarily reduced their classification prior to the end of the PIP. Where an employee’s performance has not improved through a PIP, a formal underperformance process commences. Two employees were the subject of formal processes to manage underperformance following a PIP. Of the two formal underperformance processes commenced, one employee resigned, and one employee was reassigned duties at the same level.

During 2018–19, the ABS commenced four investigations into suspected breaches of the APS Code of Conduct by ongoing ABS office-based employees. None involved privacy breaches. One employee resigned prior to finalisation of the investigation, while three investigations are yet to be finalised. One investigation that had commenced in 2017–18 was completed in 2018–19, which resulted in a breach finding and no sanction being applied.

No non-ongoing contracts for office-based employees were terminated early during 2018–19.

ABS interviewers

As with office-based employees, where there are concerns about an ABS interviewer’s performance, the employee and manager work together to implement an informal PIP. During 2018–19, one ABS interviewer commenced a PIP, and one ABS interviewer moved from a PIP into a formal underperformance process. This underperformance process was completed within the period, which resulted in an ABS interviewer having their employment terminated.

There were no misconduct investigations instigated for ABS interviewers during the period, and no non-ongoing employment contracts were ceased early.