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1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2006  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 20/01/2006   
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Contents >> Chapter 30 - International accounts and trade >> International merchandise trade

INTERNATIONAL MERCHANDISE TRADE

International merchandise trade statistics cover all movable goods which add to (imports) or subtract from (exports) Australia's stock of material resources. The statistics are compiled from information submitted by importers and exporters to the Australian Customs Service. Some goods are excluded for conceptual or practical reasons, for example, those goods temporarily brought to Australia for subsequent forwarding to foreign destinations, and low-value imports and exports in the parcel post system.

The merchandise exports and imports data are used in the compilation of the balance of payments. However, various adjustments relating to coverage, timing, classification and valuation are necessary to put international merchandise trade statistics on a balance of payments basis. Consequently, the merchandise exports and imports statistics, and the excess of exports (+) or imports (-), shown in this section differ from those shown in the International accounts section.

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

Australia's international merchandise trade statistics are compiled in broad agreement with the United Nations (UN) recommendations for the compilation of international merchandise trade statistics. More information on the concepts, sources and methods used is included in International Merchandise Trade, Australia: Concepts, Sources and Methods (5489.0).

The UN recommendations state that merchandise trade covers all movable goods which add to (imports) or subtract from (exports) the stock of material resources of a country as a result of their movement into or out of the country.

The UN definition excludes:

  • direct transit trade, that is, goods being transhipped or moved through Australia for purposes of transport only
  • ships and aircraft moving through Australia while engaged in the transport of passengers or goods between Australia and other countries
  • non-merchandise trade, consisting primarily of goods moving on a temporary basis (e.g. mobile equipment, goods under repair and goods for exhibition).

International merchandise trade statistics are compiled from information submitted by exporters and importers or their agents to the Australian Customs Service.

CLASSIFICATION

International merchandise trade is classified by commodity, by country of origin/destination, by Australian state of production/destination, and by industry of origin.

The international standard for the classification of internationally traded goods by commodity is the Harmonized System, a World Customs Organization classification which groups goods according to their component materials, from raw materials through to processed and manufactured products.

The ABS adopts this as the basis for exports classification using the Australian Harmonized Export Commodity Classification and for imports classification using the Combined Australian Customs Tariff Nomenclature and Statistical Classification (Customs Tariff).

The ABS also classifies export and import statistics according to:
  • the UN Standard International Trade Classification (SITC Rev. 3) which groups goods according to the degree of processing they have undergone, from food and crude raw materials through to highly transformed manufactures
  • the UN Classification Broad Economic Categories which classifies international trade for the purposes of general economic analysis according to the main end use of the commodities traded.

Commodity statistics in this section are presented according to SITC Rev. 3.

VALUATION

For exports, the point of valuation adopted is free-on-board (f.o.b.) at the Australian port of shipment, while the basis of valuation is 'transactions value', that is, the actual price at which the goods are sold.

For imports, the point of valuation is the point of containerisation (in most cases), or f.o.b. at the customs frontier of the exporting country or the port of loading, whichever comes first. The basis of valuation is the customs value. For transactions between independent buyers and sellers, this will generally be the price actually payable. Where traders are not independent (e.g. if they are related or affiliated in some way), an appropriate customs value may be determined.

TOTAL MERCHANDISE EXPORTS AND IMPORTS

Australia's international merchandise trade balance in 2004-05 was a record deficit of $22.8b. This followed deficits of $21.9b in 2003-04 and $17.7b in 2002-03. In 2004-05 there was a substantial rise in imports, up $18.5b (14%) to $149.5b, and a slightly smaller rise in exports, up $17.7b (16%) to $126.7b. Table 30.20 and graph 30.21 show the value of total merchandise exports and imports since 1999-2000.

30.20 TOTAL MERCHANDISE EXPORTS AND IMPORTS

Exports
Imports
Merchandise
trade balance(a)
$m
$m
$m

1999-2000
97,286
110,078
-12,792
2000-01
119,539
118,317
1,222
2001-02
121,108
119,649
1,459
2002-03
115,479
133,129
-17,650
2003-04
109,049
130,997
-21,948
2004-05
126,719
149,520
-22,801

(a) A negative sign indicates that merchandise imports exceed merchandise exports.

Source: International Trade in Goods and Services, Australia (5368.0).


Graph 30.21: TOTAL MERCHANDISE EXPORTS AND IMPORTS


MERCHANDISE EXPORTS AND IMPORTS BY COMMODITY

In 2004-05 exports increased by $17.7b (16%) to $126.7b. The SITC sections with the largest increases were:
    • Mineral fuels, lubricants and related materials, up $8.8b (43%)
    • Crude materials, inedible, except fuels, up $4.8b (23%)
    • Food and live animals, up $1.2b (7%)
    • Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material, up $1.0b (9%).

In 2004-05 imports increased by $18.5b (14%) to $149.5b. The SITC sections with the largest increases were:
    • Machinery and transport equipment, up $6.7b (11%)
    • Mineral fuels, lubricants and related materials, up $5.0b (50%)
    • Chemical and related products n.e.s., up $2.4b (16%)
    • Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material, up $2.0b (13%).

Slightly offsetting these increases in imports was a decrease in commodities and transactions not elsewhere classified in the SITC, down $0.1b (5%).

The value of merchandise exports and imports by commodity for 2003-04 and 2004-05, and their share of total merchandise trade for 2004-05, are shown in table 30.22.

30.22 MERCHANDISE EXPORTS AND IMPORTS, By commodity(a)

Exports
Imports


2003-04
2004-05
Share of total
for 2004-05
2003-04
2004-05
Share of total
for 2004-05
SITC section
$m
$m
%
$m
$m
%

Food and live animals
18,340
19,550
15.4
5,014
5,594
3.7
Beverages and tobacco
2,717
2,934
2.3
902
989
0.7
Crude materials, inedible, except fuels
20,900
25,717
20.3
1,931
1,947
1.3
Mineral fuels, lubricants and related materials
20,474
29,300
23.1
10,100
15,118
10.1
Animal and vegetable oils, fats and waxes
358
329
0.3
368
376
0.3
Chemical and related products, n.e.s.
5,302
5,937
4.7
15,059
17,482
11.7
Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
11,368
12,335
9.7
15,740
17,725
11.9
Machinery and transport equipment
11,956
12,426
9.8
60,345
67,058
44.8
Miscellaneous manufactured articles
4,288
4,377
3.5
18,703
20,528
13.7
Commodities and transactions not classified elsewhere in the SITC(b)
13,346
13,813
10.9
2,835
2,705
1.8
Total
109,049
126,718
100.0
130,997
149,522
100.0

(a) Commodities subject to a confidentiality restriction are included in Commodities and transactions not classified elsewhere in the SITC.
(b) Includes small value export entries that cannot yet be allocated by commodity.

Source: International Trade in Goods and Services, Australia (5368.0).


Australia's most valuable export commodities for 2004-5 and their contribution to total exports were: coal, $17.1b (14%); iron ore, $8.1b (6%); crude petroleum products, $5.7b (5%); and non-monetary gold, $5.6b (5%).


Between 2003-04 and 2004-05 the commodities that recorded the largest rises in the value of exports were coal, up $6.2b (57%); iron ore, up $2.8b (53%); and crude oil, up $1.1b (23%).

Table 30.23 lists the highest value commodities exported (by SITC 3-digit code) for 2003-04 and 2004-05, and their share of total merchandise exports for 2004-05.

30.23 MERCHANDISE EXPORTS OF MAJOR COMMODITIES(a)
2003-04
2004-05
Share of total
merchandise
exports 2004-05
SITC 3-digit code
$m
$m
%

Coal, not agglomerated (321)
10,916
17,117
13.5
Iron ore and concentrates (281)
5,278
8,084
6.4
Petroleum oils and oils obtained from bituminous minerals, crude (333)
4,642
5,692
4.5
Gold, non-monetary (excl. gold ores and concentrates) (971)
5,652
5,643
4.5
Meat of bovine animals, fresh, chilled or frozen (011)
3,926
4,878
3.8
Aluminium ores and concentrates (incl. alumina) (285)
3,722
4,432
3.5
Aluminium (684)
3,808
4,127
3.3
Wheat (incl. spelt) and meslin, unmilled (041)
3,399
3,395
2.7
Natural gas (343)
2,173
3,200
2.5
Alcoholic beverages (112)
2,611
2,808
2.2
Motor vehicles principally designed for transport of persons (excl. public-transport type, incl. racing cars) (781)
2,927
2,791
2.2
Medicaments (incl. veterinary medicaments) (542)
2,170
2,554
2.0
Wool and other animal hair (incl. wool tops) (268)
2,490
2,490
2.0
Petroleum oils, oils from bituminous minerals (not crude); preparations, with 70% or more by weight of these oils (334)
1,995
2,373
1.9
Ores and concentrates of base metal (excl. iron, copper, nickel, aluminium, uranium and thorium) (287)
1,330
2,034
1.6
Meat and edible meat offal (excl. bovine), suitable or fit for human consumption, fresh, chilled or frozen (012)
1,711
1,931
1.5
Copper ores and concentrates; copper mattes, cement copper (283)
1,246
1,718
1.4
Copper (682)
1,280
1,709
1.3
Milk and cream and milk products (excl. butter and cheese) (022)
1,239
1,300
1.0
Total of all other commodities(b)
46,534
48,444
38.2
Total
109,049
126,720
100.0

(a) Some commodities are subject to a confidentiality restriction. Refer to 5372.0.55.001 on the ABS web site <http://www.abs.gov.au> for the confidentiality restriction listing.
(b) Includes commodities subject to a confidentiality restriction.

Source: International Trade in Goods and Services, Australia (5368.0).


Australia's most valuable commodity imports for 2004-05, and their contribution to total imports were: passenger motor vehicles, $11.6b (8%); crude petroleum oils, $9.7b (6%); computing equipment, $5.8b (4%); and medicaments, $5.7b (4%).


Between 2003-04 and 2004-05 the commodities that recorded the largest rises in the value of imports were crude petroleum oils, up $3.4b (53%); other petroleum oils, up $1.5b (47%); and non-passenger motor vehicles, up $0.9b (30%). These falls were partly offset by falls in aircraft, down $0.1b (4%).

Table 30.24 lists the highest value commodities imported (by SITC 3-digit code) for 2003-04 and 2004-05, and their share of total merchandise imports for 2004-05.

30.24 MERCHANDISE IMPORTS OF MAJOR COMMODITIES (a)

2003-04
2004-05
Share of total
merchandise
imports 2004-05
SITC 3-digit code
$m
$m
%

Motor vehicles principally designed for transport of persons (excl. public-transport type, incl. racing cars) (781)
11,216
11,597
7.8
Petroleum oils and oils obtained from bituminous minerals, crude (333)
6,322
9,703
6.5
Automatic data processing machines and units thereof, magnetic, optical readers; data transcribers and processors (752)
5,126
5,792
3.9
Medicaments (incl. veterinary medicaments) (542)
4,897
5,719
3.8
Telecommunications equipment, n.e.s.; parts, and accessories of radio, television, video and similar apparatus, n.e.s. (764)
4,360
5,031
3.4
Petroleum oils, oils from bituminous minerals (not crude); preparations, with 70% or more by weight of these oils (334)
3,318
4,861
3.3
Motor vehicles for the transport of goods and special purpose motor vehicles (782)
3,112
4,037
2.7
Aircraft and associated equipment; spacecraft (incl. satellites and spacecraft launch vehicles; parts thereof) (792)
3,819
3,685
2.5
Gold, non-monetary (excl. gold ores and concentrates) (971)
2,563
2,468
1.7
Parts, n.e.s. and accessories of the motor vehicles of Groups 722, 781, 782 and 783 (784)
2,107
2,286
1.5
Measuring, checking, analysing and controlling instruments and apparatus, n.e.s. (874)
1,960
2,161
1.4
Parts and accessories (excl. covers, cases and the like) for use with office and automatic data processing mach. (759)
2,149
2,143
1.4
Civil engineering and contractors' plant and equipment (723)
1,731
2,096
1.4
Paper and paperboard (641)
2,028
2,071
1.4
Electrical machinery and apparatus, n.e.s. (778)
1,800
1,910
1.3
Furniture and parts thereof; bedding, mattresses, mattress supports, cushions and similar stuffed furnishings (821)
1,586
1,908
1.3
Heating and cooling equipment, and parts thereof, n.e.s. (741)
1,553
1,766
1.2
Baby carriages, toys, games and sporting goods (894)
1,581
1,670
1.1
Internal combustion piston engines, and parts thereof, n.e.s. (713)
1,573
1,555
1.0
Sound recorders or reproducers; television image and sound recorders or reproducers; prepared unrecorded media (763)
1,319
1,555
1.0
Household type, electrical and non-electrical equipment, n.e.s. (775)
1,484
1,537
1.0
Televisions (incl. video monitors and projectors) (761)
1,304
1,480
1.0
Total of all other commodities(b)
64,090
72,489
48.5
Total
130,998
149,520
100.0

(a) Some commodities are subject to a confidentiality restriction. Refer to 5372.0.55.001 on the ABS web site <http://www.abs.gov.au> for the confidentiality restriction listing.
(b) Includes commodities subject to a confidentiality restriction.

Source: International Trade in Goods and Services, Australia (5368.0).


MERCHANDISE EXPORTS AND IMPORTS BY COUNTRY

For exports, country refers to the country to which the goods were consigned at the time of export. For imports, country refers to the country of origin of the goods, that is, where the majority of processing of the goods took place.

In 2004-05 Australia recorded a merchandise trade deficit of $22.8b, which was an increase of $0.9b on the deficit of $21.9b in 2003-04. The following major trading partners contributed to this increased deficit:
    • Singapore - trade deficit of $3.9b, an increase of $1.9b on the previous year's deficit due to a $2.2b increase in imports partially offset by a $0.3b increase in exports. The main commodities contributing to the increase in imports were, petroleum, petroleum products and related materials (up $1.6b), non-monetary gold (up $0.3b), and telecommunications and sound recording and reproducing apparatus and equipment (up $0.2b). The increase in exports was spread across many commodities.
    • China - trade deficit of $6.8b, an increase of $1.4b on the previous year's deficit due to a $4.5b increase in imports partially offset by a $3.0b increase in exports. The main commodities contributing to the increase in imports were office machines and automatic data processing machines (up $0.9b), and telecommunications and sound recording and reproducing apparatus and equipment (up $0.7b) The increase in exports was mainly due to metalliferous ores and metal scrap (up $2.4b).
    • United States of America - trade deficit rose by $1.4b to $11.8b due to a $1.3b increase in imports. For imports, increases were recorded for general industrial machinery and equipment, n.e.s. and machine parts, n.e.s (up $0.3b), and road vehicles (incl. air-cushion vehicles) (up $0.3b), which were partially offset by an increase in exports of meat and meat preparations (up $0.1b), and special transactions and commodities not classified according to kind (up $0.1b).

The largest improvements in the balance of trade were recorded with the following countries:
    • Japan - trade surplus of $7.8b, up $4.0b due to a $5.1b increase in exports partially offset by a $1.1b increase in imports. Contributing to the increase in exports were coal, coke and briquettes (up $2.4b), meat and meat preparations (up $0.8b) and metalliferous ores and metal scrap (up $0.8b). Partially offsetting the increase in exports was an increase in imports of road vehicles (incl. air-cushion vehicles) (up $0.4b).
    • Republic of (South) Korea - trade surplus of $4.7b, up $1.1b due to a $1.2b increase in exports partially offset by a $0.1b increase in imports. Coal, coke and briquettes (up $0.8b) was the major contributor to the increase in exports.

Graph 30.25 shows Australian merchandise exports and imports by value for Australia's top trading partners.

Table 30.26 provides details of total merchandise exports and imports for the last two financial years and the merchandise trade balance for 2004-05 for Australia's top trading partners. Statistics are also provided for the following country groupings:
    • APEC - Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, China, Hong Kong (SAR of China), Indonesia, Japan, Republic of (South) Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United States of America and Vietnam.
    • ASEAN - Brunei Darussalam, Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam.
    • EU - Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Republic of Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom. The countries of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovak Republic and Slovenia are included from July 2004.
    • OECD - Austria, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Republic of Ireland, Italy, Japan, Republic of (South) Korea, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom and United States of America.

Graph 30.25: MERCHANDISE EXPORTS AND IMPORTS, Selected countries - 2004-05


30.26 MERCHANDISE EXPORTS AND IMPORTS, By country and country group(a)

Exports
Imports
Balance of trade



2003-04
2004-05
2003-04
2004-05
2004-05
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m

Belgium
676
884
1,237
1,179
-295
Brazil
512
633
494
643
-10
Canada
1,828
1,896
1,818
1,904
-8
China (excl. SARs and Taiwan Prov.)
9,935
12,980
15,338
19,812
-6,832
Denmark
167
170
856
1,044
-874
Egypt (b)
649
286
36
14
272
Fiji
430
394
210
212
182
Finland
575
571
651
815
-244
France
939
1,010
3,816
4,437
-3,427
Germany
1,309
1,315
7,985
8,644
-7,329
Hong Kong (SAR of China)
2,754
2,709
1,202
1,210
1,499
India
4,865
6,049
1,000
1,220
4,829
Indonesia
2,984
3,410
3,765
3,318
92
Iran
125
169
43
24
145
Iraq
315
383
-
6
377
Ireland
172
179
1,686
1,917
-1,738
Israel
160
173
470
584
-411
Italy
1,375
1,544
4,215
4,496
-2,952
Japan
19,821
24,917
16,101
17,157
7,760
Korea, Republic of (South)
8,490
9,701
4,877
5,004
4,697
Kuwait
580
463
110
164
299
Malaysia
2,224
2,582
4,707
5,920
-3,338
Mexico
341
686
603
776
-90
Netherlands
1,368
1,790
1,197
1,261
529
New Zealand
8,094
9,160
5,056
5,340
3,820
Pakistan
438
587
161
146
441
Papua New Guinea
809
1,195
1,422
1,735
-540
Philippines
938
868
762
699
169
Saudi Arabia
1,992
1,816
757
1,409
407
Singapore
3,061
3,344
5,112
7,280
-3,936
South Africa
1,427
1,653
1,246
1,328
325
Spain
659
914
1,103
1,327
-413
Sweden
228
280
1,739
1,964
-1,684
Switzerland
181
249
1,190
1,481
-1,232
Taiwan
3,705
4,883
3,396
3,612
1,271
Thailand
2,463
3,900
3,669
4,202
-302
Turkey
277
279
262
365
-86
United Arab Emirates
1,185
1,275
742
822
453
United Kingdom
5,147
4,813
5,429
5,934
-1,121
United States of America
9,481
9,434
19,929
21,273
-11,839
Vietnam
512
708
2,019
3,098
-2,390
Other countries (c)
5,858
6,468
4,587
5,747
721
Total
109,049
126,719
130,997
149,520
-22,801
APEC
77,838
92,913
91,075
103,758
-10,845
ASEAN
12,273
14,952
20,551
25,196
-10,244
Developing countries
52,823
62,297
52,071
63,799
-1,502
Least developed countries
1,183
1,488
213
223
1,265
European Union
12,951
13,804
31,500
35,085
-21,281
OECD
61,426
70,125
81,841
88,895
-18,770

(a) A negative sign indicates that merchandise imports exceed merchandise exports.
(b) Exports of alumina to Egypt are excluded from its country total and included in the 'Other countries' category.
(c) Other countries include: all countries not displayed in the table; Zone of Co-op A-Timor Gap; Destination or Origin Unknown; International Waters; No country details; Confidentialised alumina exports; and Ship and aircraft stores.

Source: International Trade in Goods and Services, Australia (5368.0).


MERCHANDISE EXPORTS AND IMPORTS BY INDUSTRY OF ORIGIN

Table 30.27 shows Australia's merchandise trade statistics classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC). The statistics are compiled by allocating international trade data for a commodity to an ANZSIC industry of origin category, based upon the industry which predominantly produces that commodity in Australia, as defined by the ANZSIC.

The majority of exports in 2004-05 were classified to the Manufacturing division, $67.4b (53% of total exports) and the Mining division, $41.0b (32% of total exports). Most ANZSIC subdivisions recorded increases in 2004-05 with the largest being in Coal mining, up $6.2b (57%); Metal ore mining, up $4.1b (41%); Oil and gas extraction, up $2.2b (30%); and Metal products, up $1.8b (10%). Slightly offsetting these rises was a fall in Textiles, clothing, footwear and leather, down $0.2b (11%).

The majority of imports were classified to the Manufacturing division, $138.0b (92% of total imports), an increase of $15.2b (12%) from 2003-04. The Mining division increased to $10.3b and the Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting division increased marginally to $0.8b. The ANZSIC subdivisions recording the largest increases were Machinery and equipment, up $7.1b (11%); Petroleum, coal, chemical and associated product manufacturing, up $4.4b (20%); and Oil and gas extraction, up $3.4b (52%).

30.27 MERCHANDISE EXPORTS AND IMPORTS, By industry of origin

Exports
Imports


2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
Industry of origin
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m

Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting
Agriculture
8,544
8,415
8,520
870
678
686
Services to agriculture; hunting and trapping
1,249
1,058
840
8
8
8
Forestry and logging
116
125
89
7
6
7
Commercial fishing
929
724
628
181
141
143
Total
10,838
10,322
10,077
1,066
832
844
Mining
Coal mining
11,943
10,920
17,119
13
13
18
Oil and gas extraction
9,346
7,466
9,697
7,893
6,488
9,849
Metal ore mining
9,716
9,924
13,975
191
228
232
Other mining
255
255
251
163
202
173
Total
31,261
28,565
41,043
8,260
6,932
10,272
Manufacturing
Food, beverage and tobacco
15,721
15,495
17,075
5,961
5,905
6,551
Textile, clothing, footwear and leather
2,759
2,174
1,925
7,842
7,369
8,071
Wood and paper products
1,883
1,872
2,016
3,759
3,709
3,819
Printing, publishing and recorded media
585
551
543
2,193
2,048
2,102
Petroleum, coal, chemical and associated products
8,028
7,849
8,977
21,247
22,064
26,501
Non-metallic mineral products
325
301
304
1,630
1,608
1,632
Metal products
19,518
18,839
20,637
9,925
9,608
11,178
Machinery and equipment
15,814
14,141
14,659
66,285
66,132
73,265
Other manufacturing
1,176
1,221
1,305
4,199
4,400
4,924
Total
65,810
62,442
67,442
123,041
122,844
138,043
Other(a)(b)
7,571
7,721
8,158
763
389
360
Total
115,479
109,049
126,719
133,129
130,997
149,520

(a) Includes exports which cannot yet be allocated by industry of origin.
(b) Includes commodities subject to a confidentiality restriction.

Source: International Trade in Goods and Services, Australia (5368.0).


INTERNATIONAL TRADE PRICE INDEXES

The export price index for goods (All groups) increased by 13.6% in 2004-05 (table 30.28). The largest increases were in the index numbers for the Mineral fuels, lubricants and other related materials (32.6%), and Manufactured goods (20.4%) SITC sections.

Between 2000-01 and 2004-05 the All groups export price index increased by 1.4%. The largest increases were in the index numbers for the Mineral fuels, lubricants and related materials (13.6%), and Crude materials, inedible, except fuels (7.7%) SITC sections.

30.28 EXPORT PRICE INDEX(a)
SITC section
2000-01
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05

Food and live animals
109.6
118.9
109.3
100.7
106.8
Beverages and tobacco
137.8
142.8
143.8
124.4
126.4
Crude materials, inedible, except fuels
95.7
99.0
97.0
90.0
103.1
Mineral fuels, lubricants and other related materials
162.7
164.7
160.9
139.4
184.9
Chemicals and related products, n.e.s.
119.9
113.0
100.4
97.2
108.3
Manufactured goods classified chiefly by materials
116.7
105.1
102.1
100.6
121.1
Machinery and transport equipment
104.1
105.6
100.6
89.8
88.4
Miscellaneous manufactured articles
118.4
119.2
104.5
90.8
89.2
All groups
114.8
116.7
111.7
102.5
116.4

(a) Reference year 1989-90 = 100.0.

Source: International Trade Price Indexes, Australia (6457.0).


The import price index for goods (All groups) increased by 0.4% in 2004-05 (table 30.29). The largest increases were in the index numbers for the Mineral fuels, lubricants and other related materials (up 29.5%) and Animal and vegetable oils, fats and waxes (5.4%) SITC sections. Offsetting these increases were decreases in the index numbers for the Machinery and transport equipment (down 4.8%) and Beverages and tobacco (4.4%) SITC sections.


Between 2000-01 and 2004-05 the All groups import price index decreased by 16.0%. The largest decreases were in index numbers for the Machinery and transport equipment (31.9%) and Miscellaneous manufactured articles (25.2%) SITC sections.

For further information concerning the definition and compilation of international trade price indexes see the Prices chapter.

30.29 IMPORT PRICE INDEX(a)

SITC section
2000-01
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05

Food and live animals chiefly for food
121.4
122.5
125.1
116.9
120.0
Beverages and tobacco
128.5
132.9
139.9
134.1
128.2
Crude materials, inedible, except fuels
139.9
124.9
123.1
112.2
115.1
Mineral fuels, lubricants and other related materials
188.0
158.4
174.9
156.2
202.3
Animal and vegetable oils, fats and waxes
122.6
122.1
141.0
134.9
142.2
Chemicals and related products n.e.s.
128.1
128.5
120.2
113.2
116.8
Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
131.3
133.9
129.2
118.9
123.2
Machinery and transport equipment
129.7
128.2
118.7
103.3
98.3
Miscellaneous manufactured articles
140.0
143.0
132.1
114.4
111.8
Commodities and transactions n.e.s.
99.6
110.8
115.4
110.2
113.3
All groups
134.3
132.3
126.0
112.3
112.8

(a) Reference year 1989-90 = 100.0.

Source: International Trade Price Indexes, Australia (6457.0).


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