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3218.0 - Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2012 Quality Declaration 
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 30/08/2013   
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MAIN FEATURES


Population change

State and territory highlights

Capital city growth

Outer suburban growth

Inner-city growth

Urban infill

Growth along the coast

Growth in inland areas

Population decline

Population change by Remoteness Areas

Population density

Centre of population


POPULATION CHANGE

Australia's estimated resident population (ERP) reached 22.7 million at 30 June 2012, increasing by 1.9 million people or 9.0% since 30 June 2007.

All states and territories experienced population growth between 2007 and 2012, with the largest increases in Australia's three most populous states. Victoria had the greatest growth (up 475,600 people), followed by New South Wales (467,000) and Queensland (454,500).

Western Australia had the fastest growth, increasing by 16%, followed by Queensland (11%) and the Northern Territory (10%). The Australian Capital Territory and Victoria grew at similar rates, up 9.4% and 9.2% respectively. The remaining states had growth below the Australian rate, with New South Wales at 6.8%, South Australia at 5.5%, and Tasmania at just 3.9%.

Population growth was most prominent in outer suburbs, inner cities, urban infill areas, along the coast, and mining areas. Areas that have seen decline include well-established suburbs within capital cities, and inland rural areas as can be seen in the following map which shows the population change of Statistical Areas Level 2 (SA2s) over this period.

SA2 POPULATION CHANGE, Australia - June 2007 to June 2012
Diagram: SA2 POPULATION CHANGE, Australia—June 2007 to June 2012


STATE AND TERRITORY HIGHLIGHTS

New South Wales
  • Population growth in Greater Sydney accounted for 74% of the state's total growth in the five years to June 2012.
  • Parklea - Kellyville Ridge was the largest and fastest-growing SA2 in New South Wales, up 11,400 people or 81%.


Victoria
  • Greater Melbourne had the largest growth of any capital city in Australia, with an increase of 406,600 people in the five years to June 2012.
  • The four SA2s with the largest growth in Australia were on the outskirts of Greater Melbourne, including South Morang (up 25,800 people) and Point Cook (19,900).


Queensland
  • Within Greater Brisbane, the inland SA4 of Ipswich experienced the largest growth in the five years to June 2012 (up 43,200 people), while Moreton Bay - South had the fastest growth (18%).
  • The population in the rest of Queensland increased by 221,400 people. The southern coastal SA4s of Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast accounted for 42% of this growth.


South Australia
  • Pooraka in Greater Adelaide's north, had the largest growth in South Australia in the five years to June 2012, up 5,000 people.
  • Munno Para West - Angle Vale was the fastest-growing SA2 in the state, increasing by 73% to 8,500 people.


Western Australia
  • Greater Perth was the fastest-growing capital city in Australia, increasing by 17% in the five years to June 2012.
  • The fastest-growing SA2 in Western Australia was Forrestdale - Harrisdale - Piara Waters on the southern outskirts of Greater Perth, increasing from 1,800 to 9,600 people.


Tasmania
  • Greater Hobart grew by 10,300 people between June 2007 and June 2012, while the rest of Tasmania increased by 8,700 people.
  • The SA2s with the fastest growth were Margate - Snug (up 21%) in Hobart's south, and Brighton - Pontville (20%) in Hobart's north.


Northern Territory
  • The northern suburb of Lyons in Greater Darwin was the fastest-growing SA2 in the Northern Territory in the five years to June 2012, increasing from 270 to 2,300 people.
  • The SA2s with the largest growth were Rosebery - Bellamack (up 2,300 people) and Darwin City (2,100).


Australian Capital Territory
  • The combined population of the Australian Capital Territory's northern SA3s increased by 31,400 people in the five years to June 2012, while the southern SA3s grew by just 820.
  • The SA3 with the largest growth was Gungahlin, increasing by 18,500 people.
CAPITAL CITY GROWTH

At 30 June 2012, just over 15 million people, close to two-thirds of Australia's population, resided in a capital city. The combined population of capital cities increased by 1.4 million people in the five years to 2012.

Greater Melbourne recorded the largest growth of all capital cities, increasing by 406,600 people, followed by Greater Sydney (up 347,100 people), Greater Perth (271,500) and Greater Brisbane (233,200). Greater Melbourne grew by an average of more than 1,500 people per week, while the population of Greater Sydney increased by over 1,300 people per week.

The population of Australia's capital cities grew by 10.2% from 2007 to 2012, faster than the rest of Australia (6.8%). Greater Perth had the fastest growth of all capital cities at 17%, ahead of Greater Darwin (13%) and Greater Brisbane (12%). The slowest growth was in Greater Hobart (5.0%).

OUTER SUBURBAN GROWTH

Many areas which experienced strong growth were located on the fringes of capital cities, where more land tends to be available for subdivision and housing development. The four SA2s with the largest growth in the country between 2007 and 2012 were all on the outskirts of Greater Melbourne. The population of South Morang increased by 25,800, followed by Point Cook (19,900), Tarneit (15,300) and Craigieburn - Mickleham (12,900).

The SA2 in New South Wales with both the largest and fastest population increase was Parklea - Kellyville Ridge, in the north-west growth corridor of Greater Sydney (up 11,400 people, or 81%).

In Western Australia, the SA2s of Baldivis, on the southern outskirts of Greater Perth, and Ellenbrook in the north-east, recorded the largest growth in the state, increasing by 11,000 and 10,600 people respectively.

In Queensland, the largest growth occurred in the outer suburban SA2 of North Lakes - Mango Hill (up 10,300 people) in the north of Greater Brisbane. Redbank Plains in the south-west also had large growth, increasing by 6,300 people.

Outer suburban areas in the smaller capital cities also had some of the strongest growth in their states or territories in the five years to 2012. The areas with the largest population increases in South Australia were the outer-Adelaide SA2s of Pooraka (up 5,000 people) and Aldinga (4,100). In the Australian Capital Territory, Franklin, Harrison and Forde, on the territory's northern fringe increased by 4,000, 3,500 and 3,200 people respectively, while on the outskirts of Greater Darwin, Rosebery - Bellamack increased by 2,300 people. In Tasmania, the outer suburban Margate - Snug had the largest growth in the state, increasing by 1,300 people.

INNER-CITY GROWTH

The inner-city SA2s of Perth City and Melbourne had population increases among the largest in Australia between June 2007 and June 2012, increasing by 7,700 and 7,600 people respectively. Other inner-city areas to experience large growth included Waterloo - Beaconsfield (up 4,700 people) and nearby Sydney - Haymarket - The Rocks (3,000), Southbank and nearby North Melbourne (both up 2,800), and Adelaide (2,700).

Darwin City was the fastest-growing of all inner-city SA2s, increasing by 68% to 5,100 people. Inner-city Melbourne and adjoining Docklands also grew rapidly, up 47% and 45% respectively.

URBAN INFILL

Urban infill is the development of a site within an already-developed area, either by building housing on land that was previously vacant or used for non-residential purposes, or by replacing low-density housing with higher-density dwellings. Infill development is becoming more common on transport corridors, near commercial hubs and in suburbs where there are older houses on large blocks of land.

In addition to some inner-city areas, urban infill contributed to strong population growth in SA2s such as Concord West - North Strathfield (up 6,400 people) and Parramatta - Rosehill (4,200) in New South Wales, and Dandenong (4,200) and Clayton (2,500) in Victoria. Other areas where urban infill contributed to large growth included Cannington - Queens Park (4,100) and Nollamara - Westminster (4,000) in Western Australia, and The Parks (2,800) in South Australia.

GROWTH ALONG THE COAST

Generally, the most prominent growth outside of capital cities occurred along the coast of Australia, particularly in Queensland. The SA2 of Upper Coomera - Willow Vale on the Gold Coast had the largest increase outside of Greater Brisbane in the five years to 2012, up 8,900 people. This was followed by Deeragun, west of Townsville's central business district, which grew by 7,400 people. Several other SA2s on Queensland's Gold Coast experienced large growth, including Coomera (up 4,700 people), Pacific Pines - Gaven (4,700) and Ormeau - Yatala (4,600). Pimpama and Coomera on the Gold Coast had rapid growth, increasing by 92% and 91% respectively.

On Australia's western seaboard, Busselton in the south grew by 4,000 people. Nearby Gelorup - Dalyellup - Stratham and Australind - Leschenault, both in Bunbury, had the next largest growth, increasing by 3,600 and 3,400 people respectively.

In Victoria, the coastal SA2 of Torquay in Geelong had the largest growth outside of Greater Melbourne, up 3,800 people or 30%. The nearby SA2s of Grovedale (up 2,300 people) and Highton (2,200) also had strong growth.

On the New South Wales coast, Wollongong and Shellharbour - Flinders, both in the Illawarra region, increased by 3,600 and 2,200 people respectively.

GROWTH IN INLAND AREAS

Some inland SA2s outside of capital cities had strong growth in the five years to June 2012. In Victoria, large inland growth occurred in Drouin (up 3,000 people) in the state's west Gippsland, and Ballarat - South (2,700), while in New South Wales, Orange - North in the state's Central West increased by 2,600. Other inland areas to experience large growth included the Queensland SA2s of Emerald (up 2,200 people) in the Fitzroy region, and Highfields (2,100) to the north of Toowoomba, and Murray Bridge (2,000) in South Australia.

Rapid growth also occurred in some of the country's inland SA2s, including the mining regions of East Pilbara (up 67%), Leinster - Leonora (40%), Murray (38%) and Ashburton (33%) in Western Australia. Drouin (up 27%) and Alfredton (26%) in Victoria, and Chinchilla (22%) in Queensland also grew rapidly.

POPULATION DECLINE

Many of the largest population declines between June 2007 and June 2012 were in well-established areas within Australia's capital cities. One possible explanation for this is that the population of these areas has aged and households have moved through the life cycle. The SA2 of Mill Park - South on the north-eastern outskirts of Greater Melbourne had the largest decline in the country, down 760 people. Also on the outskirts of Greater Melbourne, Mill Park - North and Eltham decreased by 570 and 420 people respectively. Other SA2s with large declines included Minto - St Andrews in Greater Sydney's south-west (down 610 people), and Modbury Heights in Greater Adelaide's north (down 560).

Within the Australian Capital Territory, a number of older suburbs decreased in population. SA2s with large declines included Kambah (down 510 people), neighbouring Wanniassa (down 410), and Kaleen (down 380) while there were fast declines in the adjoining southern SA2s of Macarthur (down 7.2%), Gowrie (down 7.0%) and Fadden (down 6.6%).

Outside of Australia's capital cities, a number of inland, rural areas declined, including Broken Hill (down 610 people) and Deniliquin Region (down 420) in New South Wales, and the neighbouring SA2s of Gannawarra (down 540), Buloke (down 500), Yarriambiack (down 400) and Loddon (down 390) in Victoria's north-west.

POPULATION CHANGE BY REMOTENESS AREAS

The Remoteness Structure of the Australian Statistical Geography Standard identifies five Remoteness Area (RA) categories for Australia, ranging from Major Cities to Very Remote. As at June 2012, 70% of the population resided in Australia's major cities. In comparison, just 2.3% lived in remote or very remote Australia. Very remote areas and major cities were the fastest-growing RAs in Australia, both up 10% in the five years to June 2012. The remaining RAs grew slower than Australia as a whole (9.0%), with remote areas growing at the slowest rate (4.8%).

The state or territory (excluding the Australian Capital Territory) with the highest proportion of it's population living in the major cities RA was Western Australia at 77%, while Tasmania was the state with the highest proportion living in the inner regional RA (66%), which includes Hobart. Of all the states and territories, the Northern Territory had the highest proportions in the outer regional RA (56%), which includes Darwin, as well as the remote (21%) and very remote (23%) RAs.

Within the states and territories (excluding the Australian Capital Territory), the major cities RA had the fastest growth between 2007 and 2012 in Queensland, Victoria and New South Wales. In South Australia and Tasmania, the inner regional RA was the fastest-growing, while in the Northern Territory, the outer regional RA grew the fastest. In Western Australia, the very remote RA, which includes many of the state's mining regions, grew the fastest.

ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION BY REMOTENESS STRUCTURE(a)

ERP AT 30 JUNE
CHANGE
2007
2012r
2007-2012r
no.
no.
no.
%

NSW
Major Cities
5 013 915
5 403 360
389 445
7.8
Inner Regional
1 343 656
1 414 178
70 522
5.2
Outer Regional
437 171
444 541
7 370
1.7
Remote
30 929
30 596
-333
-1.1
Very Remote
8 485
8 459
-26
-0.3
Total
6 834 156
7 301 134
466 978
6.8
Vic.
Major Cities
3 886 385
4 294 000
407 615
10.5
Inner Regional
1 017 792
1 084 544
66 752
6.6
Outer Regional
244 399
245 850
1 451
0.6
Remote
4 946
4 728
-218
-4.4
Total
5 153 522
5 629 122
475 600
9.2
Qld
Major Cities
2 525 523
2 828 456
302 933
12.0
Inner Regional
843 326
927 070
83 744
9.9
Outer Regional
610 957
671 853
60 896
10.0
Remote
75 777
79 458
3 681
4.9
Very Remote
55 435
58 692
3 257
5.9
Total
4 111 018
4 565 529
454 511
11.1
SA
Major Cities
1 144 692
1 214 013
69 321
6.1
Inner Regional
165 661
179 544
13 883
8.4
Outer Regional
201 494
202 427
933
0.5
Remote
44 421
45 459
1 038
2.3
Very Remote
14 351
14 856
505
3.5
Total
1 570 619
1 656 299
85 680
5.5
WA
Major Cities
1 598 927
1 862 676
263 749
16.5
Inner Regional
186 978
218 830
31 852
17.0
Outer Regional
173 776
185 184
11 408
6.6
Remote
93 918
101 216
7 298
7.8
Very Remote
52 540
64 800
12 260
23.3
Total
2 106 139
2 432 706
326 567
15.5
Tas.
Inner Regional
321 805
335 925
14 120
4.4
Outer Regional
160 216
165 639
5 423
3.4
Remote
8 657
8 363
-294
-3.4
Very Remote
2 584
2 406
-178
-6.9
Total
493 262
512 333
19 071
3.9
NT
Outer Regional
116 935
131 938
15 003
12.8
Remote
45 727
49 149
3 422
7.5
Very Remote
51 086
54 095
3 009
5.9
Total
213 748
235 182
21 434
10.0
ACT
Major Cities
342 154
374 245
32 091
9.4
Inner Regional
490
667
177
36.1
Total
342 644
374 912
32 268
9.4
Australia(b)
Major Cities
14 511 596
15 976 750
1 465 154
10.1
Inner Regional
3 880 078
4 161 150
281 072
7.2
Outer Regional
1 944 948
2 047 432
102 484
5.3
Remote
304 375
318 969
14 594
4.8
Very Remote
186 625
206 051
19 426
10.4
Total
20 827 622
22 710 352
1 882 730
9.0

(a) See paragraphs 19, 20 and 22 of the Explanatory Notes.
(b) Includes Other Territories.


POPULATION DENSITY

Population density varies greatly across Australia, ranging from very low in very remote areas to very high in inner-city areas. Australia's population density at 30 June 2012 was 3.0 people per square kilometre (sq km), up from 2.7 at June 2007. Among the states and territories, the Australian Capital Territory had the highest population density at 160 people per sq km, followed by Victoria with 25, New South Wales with 9.1 and Tasmania with 7.5. The remaining states and territories all had population densities below the Australian figure, with the Northern Territory having the lowest at just 0.2 people per sq km.

Population density at June 2012 was highest within capital cites, particularly in Greater Sydney. Eight of the country's top ten most densely-populated SA2s were in Greater Sydney, including Pyrmont - Ultimo, which had the highest population density in Australia, at 13,900 people per sq km, Potts Point - Woolloomooloo (13,600), Darlinghurst and Surry Hills (both 13,100). These areas all surround Sydney's central business district.

Within Greater Melbourne, the SA2s with the greatest population densities were inner-city Melbourne (10,100 people per sq km) and neighbouring Carlton (8,400). In Greater Brisbane, New Farm (6,000 people per sq km) and nearby Kangaroo Point (5,900) had the highest population densities.

At the other end of the scale, 200 SA2s in Australia had population densities of less than one person per sq km, the majority of which were in Queensland, Western Australia and New South Wales.

The SA2 with the largest increase in population density in the five years to 2012 was inner-city Melbourne, which added an extra 3,200 people per sq km. This was followed by Franklin (up 1,800 people per sq km) in the Australian Capital Territory, Pyrmont-Ultimo (1,700) in inner-Sydney, and Forde (1,700), also in the Australian Capital Territory.

POPULATION DENSITY BY SA2, Australia - June 2012
Diagram: POPULATION DENSITY BY SA2, Australia—June 2012


CENTRE OF POPULATION

The centre of population is one way in which the spatial distribution of Australia's population can be described. This point marks the average latitude and longitude around which the population is distributed.

Australia's centre of population at 30 June 2012 was 34 kilometres east of the small service locality of Ivanhoe, in western New South Wales. This location reflects the concentration of population in south-east Australia. The centre of population moved 17 kilometres north-west between 2007 and 2012. This shift reflects rapid population growth in Queensland and Western Australia over this period.

CENTRE OF POPULATION, Australia - June 2007 and June 2012
Diagram: CENTRE OF POPULATION, Australia—June 2007 and June 2012

ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION, States and Territories - Greater Capital City Statistical Areas (GCCSAs)

ERP AT 30 JUNE
CHANGE
2007
2012r
2007-2012r
GCCSA
no.
no.
no.
%

NSW
Greater Sydney
4 325 525
4 672 619
347 094
8.0
Rest of NSW
2 508 631
2 628 515
119 884
4.8
Total
6 834 156
7 301 134
466 978
6.8
Vic.
Greater Melbourne
3 841 760
4 248 344
406 584
10.6
Rest of Vic.
1 311 762
1 380 778
69 016
5.3
Total
5 153 522
5 629 122
475 600
9.2
Qld
Greater Brisbane
1 958 907
2 192 065
233 158
11.9
Rest of Qld
2 152 111
2 373 464
221 353
10.3
Total
4 111 018
4 565 529
454 511
11.1
SA
Greater Adelaide
1 204 210
1 278 432
74 222
6.2
Rest of SA
366 409
377 867
11 458
3.1
Total
1 570 619
1 656 299
85 680
5.5
WA
Greater Perth
1 628 467
1 899 999
271 532
16.7
Rest of WA
477 672
532 707
55 035
11.5
Total
2 106 139
2 432 706
326 567
15.5
Tas.
Greater Hobart
206 649
216 981
10 332
5.0
Rest of Tas.
286 613
295 352
8 739
3.0
Total
493 262
512 333
19 071
3.9
NT
Greater Darwin
116 935
131 938
15 003
12.8
Rest of NT
96 813
103 244
6 431
6.6
Total
213 748
235 182
21 434
10.0
Australian Capital Territory
342 644
374 912
32 268
9.4
Other Territories
2 514
3 135
621
24.7
Australia(a)
Greater Capital City
13 625 097
15 015 290
1 390 193
10.2
Rest of Australia
7 202 525
7 695 062
492 537
6.8
Total
20 827 622
22 710 352
1 882 730
9.0

(a) Includes Other Territories.

SA3s WITH LARGEST AND FASTEST POPULATION GROWTH IN 2007-2012

ERP AT 30 JUNE
Change
2007
2012r
2007-2012r
National rank & SA3(a) GCCSA
no.
no.
no.
%

LARGEST GROWTH

1 Wyndham Greater Melbourne
128 109
184 253
56 144
43.8
2 Wanneroo Greater Perth
125 837
169 258
43 421
34.5
3 Whittlesea - Wallan Greater Melbourne
143 524
182 415
38 891
27.1
4 Melton - Bacchus Marsh Greater Melbourne
100 671
134 097
33 426
33.2
5 Casey - South Greater Melbourne
108 677
137 845
29 168
26.8
6 Ormeau - Oxenford Rest of Qld
74 759
101 963
27 204
36.4
7 Stirling Greater Perth
172 623
197 416
24 793
14.4
8 Rockingham Greater Perth
92 235
114 553
22 318
24.2
9 Townsville Rest of Qld
163 542
184 597
21 055
12.9
10 Melbourne City Greater Melbourne
85 141
105 360
20 219
23.7
11 Cardinia Greater Melbourne
60 534
80 244
19 710
32.6
12 Sydney Inner City Greater Sydney
173 898
192 898
19 000
10.9
13 Gosnells Greater Perth
98 035
116 548
18 513
18.9
14 Gungahlin Australian Capital Territory
34 972
53 447
18 475
52.8
15 Swan Greater Perth
95 300
113 729
18 429
19.3
16 Tullamarine - Broadmeadows Greater Melbourne
123 459
141 654
18 195
14.7
17 Springfield - Redbank Greater Brisbane
53 664
71 671
18 007
33.6
18 Mandurah Greater Perth
73 439
91 211
17 772
24.2
19 North Lakes Greater Brisbane
38 593
56 269
17 676
45.8
20 Cockburn Greater Perth
79 007
96 563
17 556
22.2

FASTEST GROWTH(b)

1 Gungahlin Australian Capital Territory
34 972
53 447
18 475
52.8
2 North Lakes Greater Brisbane
38 593
56 269
17 676
45.8
3 Wyndham Greater Melbourne
128 109
184 253
56 144
43.8
4 Serpentine - Jarrahdale Greater Perth
14 126
20 048
5 922
41.9
5 Ormeau - Oxenford Rest of Qld
74 759
101 963
27 204
36.4
6 Wanneroo Greater Perth
125 837
169 258
43 421
34.5
7 Springfield - Redbank Greater Brisbane
53 664
71 671
18 007
33.6
8 Melton - Bacchus Marsh Greater Melbourne
100 671
134 097
33 426
33.2
9 Cardinia Greater Melbourne
60 534
80 244
19 710
32.6
10 Kwinana Greater Perth
24 960
32 712
7 752
31.1
11 Armadale Greater Perth
53 735
69 260
15 525
28.9
12 Fyshwick - Pialligo - Hume Australian Capital Territory
1 196
1 530
334
27.9
13 Whittlesea - Wallan Greater Melbourne
143 524
182 415
38 891
27.1
14 Casey - South Greater Melbourne
108 677
137 845
29 168
26.8
15 Caboolture Greater Brisbane
50 054
62 885
12 831
25.6
16 Pilbara Rest of WA
51 165
63 950
12 785
25.0
17 Mandurah Greater Perth
73 439
91 211
17 772
24.2
18 Rockingham Greater Perth
92 235
114 553
22 318
24.2
19 Melbourne City Greater Melbourne
85 141
105 360
20 219
23.7
20 Blacktown - North Greater Sydney
65 183
80 255
15 072
23.1

(a) National Rank based on population change between June 2007 and June 2012. See paragraphs 27 and 28 of the Explanatory Notes.
(b) Excludes SA3s with a population of less than 1,000 at June 2007.

SA3s WITH LARGEST AND FASTEST POPULATION DECLINES IN 2007-2012

ERP AT 30 JUNE
Change
2007
2012r
2007-2012r
National rank & SA3(a) GCCSA
no.
no.
no.
%

LARGEST DECLINES

1 Tuggeranong Australian Capital Territory
90 465
88 144
-2 321
-2.6
2 Murray River - Swan Hill Rest of Vic.
39 040
37 730
-1 310
-3.4
3 Glenelg - Southern Grampians Rest of Vic.
37 025
36 237
-788
-2.1
4 Lower Murray Rest of NSW
13 279
12 752
-527
-4.0
5 Broken Hill and Far West Rest of NSW
22 447
21 923
-524
-2.3
6 West Coast Rest of Tas.
19 114
18 606
-508
-2.7
7 Mid North Rest of SA
28 149
27 696
-453
-1.6
8 Bourke - Cobar - Coonamble Rest of NSW
26 946
26 558
-388
-1.4
9 Grampians Rest of Vic.
60 212
59 906
-306
-0.5
10 Loddon - Elmore Rest of Vic.
11 537
11 304
-233
-2.0

FASTEST DECLINES

1 Lower Murray Rest of NSW
13 279
12 752
-527
-4.0
2 Murray River - Swan Hill Rest of Vic.
39 040
37 730
-1 310
-3.4
3 West Coast Rest of Tas.
19 114
18 606
-508
-2.7
4 Tuggeranong Australian Capital Territory
90 465
88 144
-2 321
-2.6
5 Broken Hill and Far West Rest of NSW
22 447
21 923
-524
-2.3
6 Glenelg - Southern Grampians Rest of Vic.
37 025
36 237
-788
-2.1
7 Loddon - Elmore Rest of Vic.
11 537
11 304
-233
-2.0
8 Mid North Rest of SA
28 149
27 696
-453
-1.6
9 Bourke - Cobar - Coonamble Rest of NSW
26 946
26 558
-388
-1.4
10 Innisfail - Cassowary Coast Rest of Qld
34 955
34 751
-204
-0.6

(a) National rank based on population change between June 2007 and June 2012. See paragraphs 27 and 28 of the Explanatory Notes.



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