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3218.0 - Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2009-10 Quality Declaration 
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 31/03/2011   
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MAIN FEATURES


Population change

State and territory highlights

Capital city growth

Inner-city growth

Outer suburban growth

Urban infill

Growth along the coast

Growth in inland areas

Population declines

Population change by Remoteness Areas

Population density

Centre of population


POPULATION CHANGE

Australia's estimated resident population (ERP) reached 22.33 million at 30 June 2010, increasing by 377,100 people since 30 June 2009. This represents an annual growth rate of 1.7%, the lowest since the year ended 30 June 2006. This is the first time since 2003-04 that Australia's annual growth rate has been lower than its annual average growth rate for the last five years.

All states and territories experienced population growth in 2009-10, with the largest population increases continuing to be recorded in Australia's three most populous states. New South Wales experienced the greatest growth (up by 105,400 people), followed by Victoria (99,300) and Queensland (89,100). This is only the second time in the last nine years that Queensland has not had the largest growth of all states and territories.

For the fourth consecutive year, Western Australia recorded the fastest population growth rate at 2.2% in 2009-10, ahead of Queensland (2.0%), Victoria (1.8%) and the Australian Capital Territory (1.8%). The remaining states and territories had population growth rates below the Australian average, with Tasmania experiencing the slowest growth at 0.9%.

Population growth continued to be most prominent in inner-city areas, outer suburbs, some urban infill areas and along the coast. Areas that have seen decline include inland, rural areas that have been affected by drought in the last few years or mining areas.

SLA POPULATION CHANGE, Australia - 2009-10
Diagram: SLA POPULATION CHANGE, Australia—2009-10


The following commentary refers mainly to population changes in Local Government Areas (LGAs). However, in some cases selected Statistical Local Areas (SLAs) are referred to, particularly where LGAs cover multiple SLAs, such as in Brisbane (C), or don't exist, such as in the Australian Capital Territory.


STATE AND TERRITORY HIGHLIGHTS

New South Wales
  • Sydney SD reached 4.58 million people, an increase of 75,600 (1.7%), and continued to be the most populated capital city in Australia.
  • In 2009-10, nine of the ten fastest-growing LGAs in New South Wales were within Sydney SD, including Canada Bay (A) (3.7%) in the inner west, Parramatta (C) (3.0%) in central western Sydney and Camden (A) (2.9%) in outer south-western Sydney.


Victoria
  • Melbourne SD's growth of 79,000 people was the largest of all the Australian capital city SDs in 2009-10.
  • The LGA of Wyndham (C), located on the western suburban fringe of Melbourne SD, experienced the largest and fastest growth (12,600 people or 8.8%) of all Victorian LGAs.
  • The fastest population growth outside of the Melbourne SD occurred in the coastal LGA of Bass Coast (S) (4.6%).


Queensland
  • The three most populous LGAs in Australia, Brisbane (C), Gold Coast (C) and Moreton Bay (R), recorded three of the four largest increases in population in 2009-10. Brisbane (C) increased by 14,800 people, Gold Coast (C) by 12,900, and Moreton Bay (R) by 11,100.
  • Outside of south-east Queensland, the LGA of Townsville (C) reported the largest growth in the year to June 2010, with an increase of 4,000 people (2.2%).


South Australia
  • Playford (C), in the northern suburbs of Adelaide SD, and Alexandrina (DC) on the Fleurieu Peninsula, were the fastest-growing LGAs in the state, both increasing by 3.0%.
  • During 2009-10, the LGAs with the largest population growth in the state were Onkaparinga (C) in Adelaide's southern suburbs and Salisbury (C) in the north, which both increased by 2,400 people.


Western Australia
  • Strong population growth continued in the outer suburban fringes of Perth SD.
  • South West SD was the state's fastest-growing region (3.0%), followed by Pilbara SD and Perth SD (both 2.3%).
  • Together, just five LGAs (Wanneroo (C), Rockingham (C), Stirling (C), Swan (C) and Armadale (C)) accounted for more than one-third of the growth across the state in the year to June 2010.


Tasmania
  • Tasmania's population grew by 4,400 people in 2009-10 to 507,600. All four Tasmanian SDs experienced population growth.
  • Latrobe (M) (up 4.2%) in the north and Brighton (M) (3.5%) in the south were the fastest-growing LGAs. The LGAs with the largest growth were Clarence (C) (up 800), Kingborough (M) (710) and Brighton (M) (550), all within commuting distance of Hobart.


Northern Territory
  • Litchfield (M) and Palmerston (C) were the fastest-growing LGAs in the Northern Territory, increasing by 2.9% and 2.6% respectively.
  • Outside of Darwin SD, the fastest-growing LGAs were Victoria-Daly (S) (2.2%), East Arnhem (S) (1.8%) and Roper Gulf (S) (1.8%).


Australian Capital Territory
  • In 2009-10, population growth was largest in northern suburban Canberra, especially in the SLAs of Franklin (870 people), Macgregor (800), Forde (380) and Harrison (380).
  • For the third year in a row, the combined population of the northern SSDs (185,000 people) was greater than that of the combined southern SSDs (173,500).


CAPITAL CITY GROWTH

At 30 June 2010, more than 14.30 million people, close to two-thirds of Australia's population, resided in a capital city Statistical Division (SD). The combined population of capital city SDs increased by 257,800 in the 12 months to June 2010.

In 2009-10, Melbourne recorded the largest growth of all capital city SDs, increasing by 79,000 people, followed by Sydney (75,600), Brisbane (39,000) and Perth (37,500). Population growth in Melbourne SD equated to an average increase of over 1,500 people per week, while the population of Sydney SD increased by over 1,400 people per week.

Population growth in Australia's capital city SDs occurred at a rate of 1.8% in 2009-10, faster than that in the remainder of Australia (1.5%). Adelaide SD and Greater Hobart SD had the lowest growth rates at 1.3%.


INNER-CITY GROWTH

In 2009-10, the inner-city LGAs of Sydney (C) and Melbourne (C) had population increases among the largest in Australia, increasing by 4,500 and 3,400 people respectively. Perth (C) was the fastest-growing of all the inner capital city LGAs, increasing in population from 17,100 to 18,000 people or 5.1%.

The 2009-10 growth rates in the inner capital city LGAs of Perth (C) (5.1%), Melbourne (C) (3.6%), Sydney (C) (2.5%) and Adelaide (C) (2.2%) were lower than their average annual growth rates over the five years to June 2010. Previous construction of multistorey apartment buildings in these capital city LGAs had led to higher rates of population growth in earlier years.


OUTER SUBURBAN GROWTH

In the 12 months to June 2010, many LGAs which experienced large and/or rapid growth were located on or near the boundaries of capital city SDs, where more land tends to be available for subdivision and housing development. In Melbourne SD, the population in outer suburban Wyndham (C) increased by 12,600 (8.8%), which was both the largest and fastest increase of all Victorian LGAs. Strong growth was also experienced in Whittlesea (C) (up 8,900 people or 6.1%) and Casey (C) (8,100 people or 3.3%).

Among the LGAs with the largest population increases in New South Wales in 2009-10 were outer suburban Blacktown (C) (up 8,300 people), The Hills Shire (A) and Liverpool (C) (both 3,400).

The LGAs of Wanneroo (C) and Rockingham (C), on the northern and south-western outskirts of the Perth SD recorded strong growth in 2009-10, increasing by 6,000 and 3,900 people respectively.

In the Brisbane SD, the largest growth occurred in the outer suburban SLAs of Ipswich (C) - East (3,200 people), Griffin-Mango Hill (2,100) and Ipswich (C) - Central (2,000) for the 12 months to June 2010.

Outer suburban areas in the smaller capital city SDs also experienced some of the strongest growth in their states or territories. In 2009-10, the largest population increases of all LGAs in South Australia were in the outer Adelaide LGAs of Onkaparinga (C) (up 2,400 people), Salisbury (C) (2,400) and Playford (C) (2,300). On the outskirts of Darwin, the population in the SLAs of Lee Point-Leanyer Swamp increased by 730 and in Palmerston (C) Bal by 580. In Greater Hobart, the outer LGA of Clarence (C) increased by 800 people, the largest increase in Tasmania; and in Canberra, the SLAs of Franklin and Macgregor had the largest growth, increasing by 870 and 800 people respectively. The SLAs of Forde and Harrison also had large growth increasing by 380 people each.


URBAN INFILL

Urban infill is the development of a site within an already-developed area, either by building housing on land that was previously vacant or used for non-residential purposes, or by replacing low-density housing with higher-density dwellings. Infill development is becoming more common on transport corridors, near commercial hubs and in suburbs where there are older houses on large blocks of land.

In 2009-10, urban infill contributed to a large population increase in Parramatta (C), Canada Bay (A) and Auburn (C), all located along the Parramatta River in western Sydney, where the population increased by 5,100, 2,800 and 2,200 respectively.


GROWTH ALONG THE COAST

Outside of capital city SDs, the largest population growth generally occurred along the Australian coast in 2009-10. Several LGAs on Queensland's seaboard had large population increases including the Gold Coast (C) (up 12,900 people) and Sunshine Coast (R) (7,500) in south-east Queensland, and Townsville (C) (4,000) and Cairns (R) (3,900) in the north.

In 2009-10, the seaside LGA of Wollongong (C) in NSW experienced the largest growth outside of Sydney SD (up 2,300 people), followed by Lake Macquarie (C) (1,800) and Newcastle (C) (1,500), both on the coast to the north of Sydney.

Many coastal LGAs in Western Australia were also among the fastest-growing in Australia. Rapid population growth occurred in 2009-10 in Capel (S) (5.4%) and Busselton (S) (4.1%).


GROWTH IN INLAND AREAS

Some LGAs in inland areas outside of capital city SDs also experienced rapid growth in the 12 months to June 2010. Chittering (S), which is north of Perth SD experienced the fastest increase of all inland LGAs (up 4.9%).

Other fast growing inland LGAs in 2009-10 include Somerset (R) (4.2%) to the north-west of Brisbane, and Yass Valley (A) (2.8%) and Palerang (A) (2.2%) in New South Wales near the Australian Capital Territory border.


POPULATION DECLINES

Population losses in 2009-10 mainly occurred in inland rural Australia, particularly in north-eastern and south-eastern parts of Australia and in rural Western Australia. These are areas that may have been affected by drought in the last few years or mining areas.

Broken Hill (C) in New South Wales experienced the largest population decline in the year to June 2010 (120 people). Other LGAs with population declines were Yarriambiack (S) (down 70 people), Hindmarsh (S) (60) and Gannawarra (S) (60), all in Victoria.

The fastest declines in population in 2009-10 occurred in Ravensthorpe (S) and Moora (S) in Western Australia, down 2.2% and 1.2% respectively. These were followed by the LGAs of Yarriambiack (S) (0.9%) and Hindmarsh (S) (0.9%) in Victoria.
POPULATION CHANGE BY REMOTENESS AREAS

As at June 2010, 68.7% of the population resided in Australia's major cities, as defined in the Remoteness Structure of the Australian Standard Geographical Classification (cat. no. 1216.0). In comparison, just 2.3% lived in remote or very remote Australia. Major cities and inner regional areas were the fastest-growing remoteness areas (RAs) in Australia (both 1.8%) in the 12 months to June 2010. The remaining RAs grew slower than Australia as a whole (1.7%), with remote areas growing at the slowest rate (0.8%).

The Australian Capital Territory had the greatest proportion of its population living in the major cities RA (99.8%) at June 2010, while Tasmania had the highest percentage (64.8%) living in inner regional Australia, which includes Hobart. The Northern Territory had the highest proportion of its population living in outer regional Australia (56.0%), which includes Darwin, as well as remote (21.2%) and very remote (22.8%) Australia.

In 2009-10, major cities were the fastest-growing RAs in Victoria (1.9%) and New South Wales (1.6%), while inner regional areas were the fastest-growing in Western Australia (3.7%), South Australia (1.8%) and Tasmania (1.0%). In Queensland, major cities and inner regional areas experienced the equal fastest growth (both 2.1%). Outer regional RAs experienced the fastest growth in the Northern Territory (2.1%).

ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION BY REMOTENESS STRUCTURE(a)

ERP at 30 June
Change
2009r
2010p
2009r-10p
no.
no.
no.
%

NSW
Major Cities
5 195 849
5 279 542
83 693
1.6
Inner Regional
1 442 816
1 461 618
18 802
1.3
Outer Regional
451 094
453 948
2 854
0.6
Remote
32 922
32 991
69
0.2
Very Remote
4 487
4 490
3
0.1
Total
7 127 168
7 232 589
105 421
1.5
Vic.
Major Cities
4 093 699
4 171 765
78 066
1.9
Inner Regional
1 089 727
1 109 580
19 853
1.8
Outer Regional
258 452
259 869
1 417
0.5
Remote
4 734
4 718
-16
-0.3
Total
5 446 612
5 545 932
99 320
1.8
Qld
Major Cities
2 644 191
2 699 182
54 991
2.1
Inner Regional
970 977
991 310
20 333
2.1
Outer Regional
672 876
685 272
12 396
1.8
Remote
86 522
87 221
699
0.8
Very Remote
50 201
50 865
664
1.3
Total
4 424 767
4 513 850
89 083
2.0
SA
Major Cities
1 181 789
1 196 731
14 942
1.3
Inner Regional
198 620
202 195
3 575
1.8
Outer Regional
183 920
185 061
1 141
0.6
Remote
46 200
46 494
294
0.6
Very Remote
13 983
14 101
118
0.8
Total
1 624 512
1 644 582
20 070
1.2
WA
Major Cities
1 598 608
1 632 570
33 962
2.1
Inner Regional
296 159
307 122
10 963
3.7
Outer Regional
203 175
205 472
2 297
1.1
Remote
97 388
98 686
1 298
1.3
Very Remote
49 106
49 660
554
1.1
Total
2 244 436
2 293 510
49 074
2.2
Tas.
Inner Regional
325 487
328 815
3 328
1.0
Outer Regional
167 378
168 380
1 002
0.6
Remote
7 830
7 865
35
0.4
Very Remote
2 597
2 583
-14
-0.5
Total
503 292
507 643
4 351
0.9
NT
Outer Regional
125 967
128 607
2 640
2.1
Remote
48 464
48 668
204
0.4
Very Remote
51 776
52 436
660
1.3
Total
226 207
229 711
3 504
1.5
ACT
Major Cities
351 766
357 931
6 165
1.8
Inner Regional
519
640
121
23.3
Total
352 285
358 571
6 286
1.8
Australia (b)
Major Cities
15 065 902
15 337 721
271 819
1.8
Inner Regional
4 324 696
4 401 672
76 976
1.8
Outer Regional
2 062 862
2 086 609
23 747
1.2
Remote
324 060
326 643
2 583
0.8
Very Remote
174 216
176 202
1 986
1.1
Total
21 951 736
22 328 847
377 111
1.7

(a) See paragraphs 21 to 23 and paragraph 30 of the Explanatory Notes.
(b) Includes Other Territories.


POPULATION DENSITY

Population density varies greatly across Australia, ranging from very low in remote areas to very high in inner-city areas. Australia's population density at June 2010 was 2.9 people per square kilometre (sq km). Among the states and territories, the Australian Capital Territory had the highest population density at 152.5 people per sq km, followed by Victoria with 24.4, New South Wales with 9.0 and Tasmania with 7.5. The remaining states and territories all had population densities below the Australian figure, with the Northern Territory having the lowest at just 0.2 people per sq km.

Population density at June 2010 was highest in capital city SDs, particularly in Sydney SD. Six of the top ten most densely-populated SLAs were in Sydney SD, including Sydney (C) - East, which had the highest population density in Australia (8,800 people per sq km), the neighbouring Sydney (C) - West (7,900) and Waverley (A) (7,500), which contains the eastern beach-side suburbs of Bondi and Bronte. Within Melbourne SD, the SLAs with the greatest population densities were Melbourne (C) - Inner (8,000 people per sq km) and nearby Port Phillip (C) - St Kilda (6,400). In Brisbane SD, New Farm (5,900) and Kangaroo Point (5,600) had the highest population densities.

At the other end of the scale, there were over 240 SLAs in Australia which had population densities of less than one person per sq km at June 2010, almost one-third of which were located in Western Australia.

Between June 2009 and June 2010, the SLA which recorded the largest increase in population density was Franklin in the Australian Capital Territory (an extra 380 people per sq km), a relatively newly developed area. This was followed by Melbourne (C) - Inner (an extra 270 people per sq km) and Melbourne (C) - Southbank - Docklands (up 220 people per sq km), both inner-city areas.

POPULATION DENSITY BY SLA, Australia - June 2010
Diagram: POPULATION DENSITY, Australia—2009-10




CENTRE OF POPULATION

The centre of population is one way in which the spatial distribution of Australia's population can be described. This point marks the average latitude and longitude around which the population is distributed.

Australia's centre of population at June 2010 was approximately 47 kilometres east of the small service town of Ivanhoe, in the western New South Wales LGA of Central Darling (A). The centre of population moved approximately 11.5 kilometres north-west in the five years from June 2005 to June 2010. This shift reflects strong population growth in northern New South Wales, Queensland and Western Australia.

CENTRE OF POPULATION, Australia - June 2005 and June 2010
Diagram: CENTRE OF POPULATION, Australia—June 2005 to June 2010

ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION, States and Territories - Capital City and Balance of State/Territory

ERP at 30 June
Change
2009r
2010p
2009r-10p
Part of S/T
no.
no.
no.
%

NSW
Sydney SD
4 499 888
4 575 532
75 644
1.7
Balance of state
2 627 280
2 657 057
29 777
1.1
Total
7 127 168
7 232 589
105 421
1.5
Vic.
Melbourne SD
3 998 022
4 077 036
79 014
2.0
Balance of state
1 448 590
1 468 896
20 306
1.4
Total
5 446 612
5 545 932
99 320
1.8
Qld
Brisbane SD
2 004 225
2 043 185
38 960
1.9
Balance of state
2 420 542
2 470 665
50 123
2.1
Total
4 424 767
4 513 850
89 083
2.0
SA
Adelaide SD
1 188 139
1 203 186
15 047
1.3
Balance of state
436 373
441 396
5 023
1.2
Total
1 624 512
1 644 582
20 070
1.2
WA
Perth SD
1 658 520
1 696 065
37 545
2.3
Balance of state
585 916
597 445
11 529
2.0
Total
2 244 436
2 293 510
49 074
2.2
Tas.
Hobart SD
212 019
214 705
2 686
1.3
Balance of state
291 273
292 938
1 665
0.6
Total
503 292
507 643
4 351
0.9
NT
Darwin SD
124 909
127 532
2 623
2.1
Balance of territory
101 298
102 179
881
0.9
Total
226 207
229 711
3 504
1.5
ACT
Canberra SD
351 964
358 222
6 258
1.8
Balance of territory
321
349
28
8.7
Total
352 285
358 571
6 286
1.8
Other Territories
2 457
2 459
2
0.1
Australia
Capital City
14 037 686
14 295 463
257 777
1.8
Balance of Australia(a)
7 914 050
8 033 384
119 334
1.5
Total
21 951 736
22 328 847
377 111
1.7

(a) Includes Other Territories.

LGAs WITH LARGEST POPULATION CHANGES IN 2009-10

ERP at 30 June
Change
2009r
2010p
2009r-10p
National rank & LGA(a) Part of S/T
no.
no.
no.
%

LARGEST INCREASES

1 Brisbane (C) Brisbane
1 052 438
1 067 279
14 841
1.4
2 Gold Coast (C) Qld Bal
514 885
527 828
12 943
2.5
3 Wyndham (C) Melbourne
143 969
156 573
12 604
8.8
4 Moreton Bay (R) Brisbane
371 155
382 280
11 125
3.0
5 Whittlesea (C) Melbourne
146 223
155 113
8 890
6.1
6 Blacktown (C) Sydney
299 492
307 816
8 324
2.8
7 Casey (C) Melbourne
247 511
255 659
8 148
3.3
8 Sunshine Coast (R) Qld Bal
323 419
330 934
7 515
2.3
9 Melton (S) Melbourne
100 062
107 150
7 088
7.1
10 Wanneroo (C) Perth
144 107
150 106
5 999
4.2
11 Ipswich (C) Brisbane
162 381
168 131
5 750
3.5
12 Logan (C) Brisbane
277 560
282 673
5 113
1.8
13 Parramatta (C) Sydney
167 261
172 333
5 072
3.0
14 Cardinia (S) Melbourne
68 684
73 318
4 634
6.7
15 Sydney (C) Sydney
177 738
182 226
4 488
2.5
16 Hume (C) Melbourne
167 644
171 996
4 352
2.6
17 Townsville (C) Qld Bal
181 740
185 768
4 028
2.2
18 Rockingham (C) Perth
100 203
104 130
3 927
3.9
19 Cairns (R) Qld Bal
164 354
168 251
3 897
2.4
20 Greater Geelong (C) Vic. Bal
216 465
220 068
3 603
1.7
21 The Hills Shire (A) Sydney
176 308
179 716
3 408
1.9
22 Liverpool (C) Sydney
182 076
185 481
3 405
1.9
23 Melbourne (C) Melbourne
93 163
96 552
3 389
3.6
24 Brimbank (C) Melbourne
186 006
189 386
3 380
1.8
25 Stirling (C) Perth
198 746
202 014
3 268
1.6

LARGEST DECLINES

1 Broken Hill (C) NSW Bal
19 940
19 818
-122
-0.6
2 Yarriambiack (S) Vic. Bal
7 686
7 614
-72
-0.9
3 Hindmarsh (S) Vic. Bal
6 206
6 150
-56
-0.9
4 Gannawarra (S) Vic. Bal
11 672
11 617
-55
-0.5
5 Buloke (S) Vic. Bal
7 082
7 028
-54
-0.8
6 Deniliquin (A) NSW Bal
7 685
7 633
-52
-0.7
7 Ravensthorpe (S) WA Bal
2 401
2 349
-52
-2.2
8 Dundas (S) WA Bal
1 204
1 159
-45
-3.7
9 Narrogin (S) WA Bal
909
865
-44
-4.8
10 Southern Grampians (S) Vic. Bal
17 574
17 531
-43
-0.2
11 Loddon (S) Vic. Bal
8 084
8 047
-37
-0.5
12 Circular Head (M) Tas. Bal
8 300
8 263
-37
-0.4
13 Wakool (A) NSW Bal
4 422
4 389
-33
-0.7
14 Mount Marshall (S) WA Bal
686
653
-33
-4.8
15 Lake Grace (S) WA Bal
1 482
1 450
-32
-2.2
16 Northern Grampians (S) Vic. Bal
12 347
12 316
-31
-0.3
17 Moora (S) WA Bal
2 574
2 543
-31
-1.2
18 Three Springs (S) WA Bal
732
704
-28
-3.8
19 Northern Areas (DC) SA Bal
4 869
4 843
-26
-0.5
20 Broomehill-Tambellup (S) WA Bal
1 282
1 256
-26
-2.0
21 West Wimmera (S) Vic. Bal
4 616
4 591
-25
-0.5
22 Brookton (S) WA Bal
1 031
1 006
-25
-2.4
23 Mount Magnet (S) WA Bal
664
639
-25
-3.8
24 Cue (S) WA Bal
302
278
-24
-7.9
25 The Coorong (DC) SA Bal
5 828
5 805
-23
-0.4

(a) National rank based on numerical change in population between June 2009 and June 2010. See paragraphs 18 and 19 of the Explanatory Notes.

LGAs WITH FASTEST POPULATION CHANGES IN 2009-10

ERP at 30 June
Change
2009r
2010p
2009r-10p
National rank & LGA(a) Part of S/T
no.
no.
no.
%

FASTEST INCREASES

1 Wyndham (C) Melbourne
143 969
156 573
12 604
8.8
2 Melton (S) Melbourne
100 062
107 150
7 088
7.1
3 Cardinia (S) Melbourne
68 684
73 318
4 634
6.7
4 Whittlesea (C) Melbourne
146 223
155 113
8 890
6.1
5 Capel (S) WA Bal
12 684
13 370
686
5.4
6 Perth (C) Perth
17 089
17 955
866
5.1
7 Armadale (C) Perth
58 136
60 983
2 847
4.9
8 Chittering (S) WA Bal
4 309
4 519
210
4.9
9 Northern Peninsula Area (R) Qld Bal
2 282
2 389
107
4.7
10 Bass Coast (S) Vic. Bal
29 603
30 974
1 371
4.6
11 Serpentine-Jarrahdale (S) Perth
16 487
17 212
725
4.4
12 Murray (S) WA Bal
14 759
15 401
642
4.3
13 Somerset (R) Qld Bal
21 608
22 519
911
4.2
15 Latrobe (M) Tas. Bal
9 616
10 020
404
4.2
14 Wanneroo (C) Perth
144 107
150 106
5 999
4.2
16 Busselton (S) WA Bal
30 505
31 767
1 262
4.1
17 Port Hedland (T) WA Bal
14 068
14 624
556
4.0
18 Rockingham (C) Perth
100 203
104 130
3 927
3.9
19 Baw Baw (S) Vic. Bal
41 351
42 921
1 570
3.8
20 Canada Bay (A) Sydney
75 922
78 735
2 813
3.7
21 Melbourne (C) Melbourne
93 163
96 552
3 389
3.6
22 Yarrabah (S) Qld Bal
2 628
2 722
94
3.6
23 Kwinana (T) Perth
28 036
29 029
993
3.5
24 Ipswich (C) Brisbane
162 381
168 131
5 750
3.5
25 Brighton (M) Greater Hobart
15 807
16 358
551
3.5

FASTEST DECLINES

1 Ravensthorpe (S) WA Bal
2 401
2 349
-52
-2.2
2 Moora (S) WA Bal
2 574
2 543
-31
-1.2
3 Yarriambiack (S) Vic. Bal
7 686
7 614
-72
-0.9
4 Hindmarsh (S) Vic. Bal
6 206
6 150
-56
-0.9
5 Southern Mallee (DC) SA Bal
2 190
2 172
-18
-0.8
6 Buloke (S) Vic. Bal
7 082
7 028
-54
-0.8
7 Wakool (A) NSW Bal
4 422
4 389
-33
-0.7
8 Deniliquin (A) NSW Bal
7 685
7 633
-52
-0.7
9 Broken Hill (C) NSW Bal
19 940
19 818
-122
-0.6
10 West Wimmera (S) Vic. Bal
4 616
4 591
-25
-0.5
11 Hay (A) NSW Bal
3 367
3 349
-18
-0.5
12 Northern Areas (DC) SA Bal
4 869
4 843
-26
-0.5
13 Gannawarra (S) Vic. Bal
11 672
11 617
-55
-0.5
14 Loddon (S) Vic. Bal
8 084
8 047
-37
-0.5
15 Circular Head (M) Tas. Bal
8 300
8 263
-37
-0.4
16 The Coorong (DC) SA Bal
5 828
5 805
-23
-0.4
17 Lachlan (A) NSW Bal
6 865
6 844
-21
-0.3
18 Dorset (M) Tas. Bal
7 377
7 355
-22
-0.3
19 Northern Grampians (S) Vic. Bal
12 347
12 316
-31
-0.3
20 Southern Grampians (S) Vic. Bal
17 574
17 531
-43
-0.2
21 Carrathool (A) NSW Bal
2 961
2 954
-7
-0.2
22 Wellington (A) NSW Bal
8 895
8 875
-20
-0.2
23 Roxby Downs (M) SA Bal
4 487
4 478
-9
-0.2
24 Queenscliffe (B) Vic. Bal
3 320
3 314
-6
-0.2
25 Waratah/Wynyard (M) Tas. Bal
14 117
14 096
-21
-0.1

(a) National rank based on percentage change in population between June 2009 and June 2010, excluding LGAs with a population of less than 2,000 at June 2009. See paragraphs 18 and 19 of the Explanatory Notes.



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