Australian Bureau of Statistics

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6254.0 - Career Experience, Australia, Nov 2002  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 22/09/2003   
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SUMMARY OF FINDINGS

OVERVIEW

In November 2002, there were 7,726,000 employees in the Australian labour force.

Approximately 3,392,800 (44%) employees had been with their current employer for one year or more and had experienced some change in their work in the previous 12 months. There were 2,952,100 (42%) employees in this category in 1998, and 2,772,300 (40%) in 1996.

Thirty-three per cent (2,583,900) of employees had been with their current employer for one year or more and had no change in their work. This compares with 2,444,400 (35%) in 1998 and 2,382,800 (35%) in 1996.

There were 1,749,400 (23%) employees who had been with their current employer for less than one year, compared with 1,610,100 (23%) in 1998, and 1,702,300 (25%) in 1996.


CHANGES IN WORK

Information on changes in work in the last 12 months is available for the estimated 5,976,600 employees who had worked with their current employer for one year or more.

The most commonly reported changes were: 'more responsibility' (reported by 40% of these employees); 'new, different or extra duties' (38%) and 'change in hours' (19%). Approximately 43% reported no change at all.

Female employees were more likely to have had 'more responsibility' (41%), 'new, different or extra duties' (40%) and 'change in hours' (24%), than male employees (38%, 35% and 15% respectively). Approximately 8% of females and 7% of males had been promoted.

The proportion of full-time employees who were 'promoted' (7%) or 'transferred' (5%) was higher than that of part-time employees (both 3%).

Full-time employees were more likely to have had 'more responsibility' (34%) and 'new, different or extra duties' (32%) than part-time employees (21% and 20% respectively).

The most common change for part-time employees was a 'change in hours'. More than one in five (22%) part-time employees had a 'change in hours' compared with only 12% of full-time employees.

Being given 'more responsibility' was one of the most common changes reported by employees in all age groups except those aged 65 years and over. Employees aged 20–24 years and 25–30 years were most likely to have been given 'more responsibility' (48% and 47% respectively), compared with 34% for those aged 45–54 years and 27% for those aged 55–64 years.

A higher proportion of associate professionals were promoted (11%) than employees in any other occupation group. This group was also the one most likely to change location (11%).


LENGTH OF TIME WITH CURRENT EMPLOYER

In November 2002, 5,976,600 employees had been with their current employer for one year or more and 1,749,400 had been with their current employer for less than one year.

Full-time employees were more likely to have worked for their current employer for a greater length of time than those working part-time. An estimated 43% of full-time employees had worked for five years or more for their current employer compared with 30% of part-timers. In contrast, 30% of part-time employees had worked less than one year for their current employer compared with 20% of full-time employees.

Employees with leave entitlements were more likely to have worked five years or more for their current employer (46%) than employees without leave entitlements (23%).


EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Approximately 3,310,200 (43%) employees studied or attended formal education in the last 12 months while working with their current employer. Of these:

  • 86% had leave entitlements in their main job
  • 84% had been with their current employer for more than one year
  • 43% had a bachelor degree or higher, advanced diploma, or diploma as their level of highest educational attainment
  • 19% had year 12 as their level of highest educational attainment.

Of the 5,976,600 employees who had worked with their current employer for one year or more, 3,757,000 (63%) had some study or training in the last 12 months, including formal study or training as well as on-the-job and other informal training. This compares with 59% in 1998 and 57% in 1996.


CAREER BREAKS

Of the 6,736,500 employees who had worked with their current employer for six months or more, 268,400 (4%) had taken a break of six months or more while working with their current employer, and 29,400 (less than 1%) were 'currently away from work'.

Of the employees who took a break of six months or more while working with their current employer, 200,000 were females, 73% of whom cited 'family reasons' as the main reason for their most recent break. The majority (32,200 or 47%) of males took their most recent break from work of six months or more for 'personal reasons', compared with 16% of females.


LEAVE TAKEN ON MOST RECENT BREAK OF SIX MONTHS OR MORE

The most common leave types taken by females for their most recent break of six months or more were 'unpaid parental' (37%); 'leave without pay' (32%); and 'paid parental' (26%).

Among the 64,800 males who took a break of six months or more while working with their current employer, the most common leave types were 'leave without pay' (38%) and 'long service' (17%).


LEAVE TAKEN FOR THE BIRTH OF YOUNGEST CHILD

Around 690,700 employees with children aged under six years took a break from work when their youngest child was born. Of these, 393,900 (57%) were males, and 296,700 (43%) were females. Approximately 54,400 (8%) of these employees ceased work when their youngest child was born, the vast majority of whom were females (96%).

The most common leave types taken by females when the youngest child was born were 'unpaid parental' (39%) and 'paid parental' (32%). For males, the most common leave types were 'recreational/holiday/annual' (68%) and 'paid parental' (19%).

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