4530.0 - Crime Victimisation, Australia, 2011-12 Quality Declaration 
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 19/02/2013   
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Contents >> Household Crime >> Break-in and Attempted Break-in



BREAK-IN AND ATTEMPTED BREAK-IN

BREAK-IN

Break-in is an act of unauthorised forced entry into a home. It includes break-ins to garages, sheds or any detached secure buildings such as games/hobby rooms and granny flats. Caravans were only included if they were a permanent residence. Break-in incidents relating to cars or front or rear yards are excluded. Also excluded are any incidents of attempted break-in, as these are counted elsewhere in the survey.

There were an estimated 372,400 break-in incidents in the 12 months prior to interview in 2011–12 experienced by 249,800 (2.9%) Australian households. Nearly four in five (79%) of victims of break-in reported the most recent incident they experienced to the police.

The break-in victimisation rates for the Northern Territory (6.0%) and Western Australia (4.5%) were both higher than the national average (2.9%) and higher than all other states and territories.

The break-in victimisation rates for South Australia (2.3%) and ACT (1.7%) were both lower than the national average (2.9%) and lower than for the Northern Territory (6.0%), Western Australia (4.5%) and Queensland (3.0%). The break-in victimisation rate for the ACT was also lower than for NSW (2.8%).

2011-12 Break-in Victimisation Rate, by State and Territory
Graph Image for 2011-12 BREAK-IN VICTIMISATION RATE, By state and territory


The rate at which incidents of break-in were reported to police for Western Australia (88%) was statistically significantly higher than the national average (79%). Victims in Western Australia and Victoria (85%) were more likely to have the most recent incident they experienced reported to the police than those in NSW (75%), Queensland (75%) and Tasmania (69%).

2011-12 Rate of Reporting of Break-ins to Police, by State and Territory
Graph Image for 2011-12 BREAK-IN REPORTING RATE, By state and territory

Footnotes
(a) ACT and NT break-in reporting rates are not available for publication.

ATTEMPTED BREAK-IN

Attempted break-in is an incident where an attempt was made to forcibly enter a home. It also includes attempts to forcibly enter a caravan (if the caravan was the respondent’s permanent residence), garage, shed or any detached secure building such as games/hobby rooms or granny flat. It includes incidents where a person saw someone acting suspiciously around the property if it was suspected that their intent was to steal property. It excludes any attempted break-in that resulted in an actual break-in (for example, where someone attempted to break in through a door but then gained entry through a window). It also excludes attempts to forcibly enter a motor vehicle.

In the 12 months prior to interview in 2011–12, an estimated 295,200 incidents of attempted break-in were experienced by 196,600 (2.3%) Australian households. Around two-fifths (41%) of incidents of attempted break-in were reported to police.

The attempted break-in victimisation rates for Western Australia (3.4%), Northern Territory (4.8%) and ACT (3.4%) were all higher than the national average (2.3%). Households in all three states were also more likely to be victims of attempted break-in than NSW (1.9%), Victoria (1.7%) and South Australia (2.0%).

The attempted break-in victimisation rate for Victoria (1.7%) was lower than the national average (2.3%). Households in Victoria were also less likely to be victims of attempted break-in than households in Queensland (2.7%), Western Australia (3.4%), Tasmania (2.5%), Northern Territory (4.8%) and ACT (3.4%).

2011-12 Attempted Break-in Victimisation Rate, by State and Territory
Graph Image for 2011-12 ATTEMPTED BREAK-IN VICTIMISATION RATE, By State and territory


The rates for reporting attempted break-in to police for South Australia (27%) and Tasmania (27%) were both lower than the national average (41%). Victims in these states were also statistically significantly less likely to have the most recent incident they experienced reported to the police than victims in Victoria (49%) and Queensland (45%).

2011-12 Rate of Reporting of Attempted Break-ins to Police, by State and Territory
Graph Image for 2011-12 ATTEMPTED BREAK-IN REPORTING RATE, By State and territory

Footnotes
* The estimate for the ACT attempted break-in reporting rate has a relative standard error between 25% and 50% and should be used with caution.

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