4906.0 - Personal Safety, Australia, 2016  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 08/11/2017   
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ACTIONS TAKEN IN RESPONSE TO PARTNER VIOLENCE

Note: this data refers to the respondent's help-seeking behaviours over the whole relationship with their current partner and/or most recent violent previous partner.

WHETHER SOUGHT ADVICE OR SUPPORT ABOUT PARTNER VIOLENCEEndnote 1

Women were more likely than men to seek advice or support about the violence which they experienced by either a current or previous partner (for definition of ‘advice or support’, refer to the Glossary). Refer to Tables 17 and 18.

Graph Image for PERSONS WHO EXPERIENCED PARTNER VIOLENCE(a), Sought advice or support by partner type by sex

Footnote(s): (a) Experienced partner violence since the age of 15.

Source(s): Personal Safety Survey, 2016



Whether women sought advice or support about partner violence

Current partner
    • Just over half of women (54% or 149,700) who experienced current partner violence had sought advice or support about the violence they experienced. Of these women, approximately two thirds sought advice or support from a friend or family member (67% or 100,100).
    • Of the women who did not seek advice or support (46% or 126,900) approximately half reported that one of the reasons for not seeking advice or support was because they felt they could deal with it themselves (50% or 63,100).

Previous partner
    • An estimated 63% of women (864,100) who experienced previous partner violence, had sought advice or support about the violence they experienced. Of these women, approximately two thirds sought advice or support from a friend or family member (65% or 560,600).
    • Approximately one third of women (37% or 506,800) who experienced previous partner violence had not sought advice or support about the violence they experienced. The most common reason for these women not seeking advice or support was because they felt they could deal with it themselves (47% or 238,400).

Whether men sought advice or support about partner violence

Current partner
    • Approximately 68% of men (102,400) who experienced current partner violence had not sought advice or support about the violence they experienced.

Previous partner
    • Approximately two out of three men (59% or 235,300) who experienced previous partner violence had not sought advice or support about the violence they experienced. The most common reason for these men not seeking advice or support was because they felt they could deal with it themselves (60% or 141,800).
    • Of those that sought advice or support (41% or 161,900), over half sought advice or support from a friend or family member (54% or 87,500).


WHETHER POLICE CONTACTED ABOUT PARTNER VIOLENCE

A large proportion of men and women that experienced current or previous partner violence never contacted police. Refer to Table 19.

Graph Image for PERSONS WHO EXPERIENCED PARTNER VIOLENCE(a), Never contacted the police(b) by partner type by sex

Footnote(s): (a) Experienced partner violence since the age of 15. (b) Contacting the police includes where the police were contacted by the respondent or by someone else..

Source(s): Personal Safety Survey, 2016



Police involvement in men's experience of partner violence

Current partner
    • An estimated 97% of men (146,100) who experienced current partner violence never contacted the police.

Previous partner
    • An estimated 76% of men (299,900) who experienced previous partner violence never contacted the police.
    • Of the estimated 99,100 men who had contacted the police approximately three quarters (73% or 72,300) reported that their partner was not charged.

Police involvement in women's experience of partner violence

Current partner
    • An estimated 82% of women (225,700) who experienced current partner violence never contacted the police.
    • Of the estimated 47,900 women who had contacted the police, approximately half (55% or 26,200) reported that their partner was not charged.

Previous partner
    • An estimated 65% of women (888,100) who experienced previous partner violence never contacted the police.
    • Of the estimated 485,800 women who had contacted the police approximately half (56% or 271,900) reported that their partner was not charged.
    • Of the estimated 189,300 women whose violent partner was charged, approximately 86% (162,200) reported that their partner went to court.


WHETHER A RESTRAINING ORDER WAS EVER ISSUED AGAINST A VIOLENT PREVIOUS PARTNEREndnote 2

A small proportion of men and women had a restraining order issued against their violent previous partner. Refer to Tables 25 and 26. Women were more likely than men to have a restraining order issued against their violent previous partner.
    • Approximately one in four women who experienced previous partner violence had a restraining order issued against their partner (24% or 329,500).
    • Approximately one in ten men who experienced previous partner violence had a restraining order issued against their partner (10% of 41,100).


ENDNOTES

Endnote 1

To minimise the risk of identifying individuals in aggregate statistics, perturbation has been applied. Perturbation involves a small random adjustment of the statistics and is considered the most satisfactory technique for avoiding the release of identifiable statistics while maximising the range of information that can be released. However as a result, these random adjustments of estimates may result in the sum of components not equalling the total or subtotal. For more details, refer to the Explanatory notes of this publication.

Endnote 2

Different terminology is used across different states of Australia to label violence orders including apprehended violence orders, domestic violence orders, intervention orders (etc.). Information collected in the survey is based on respondent’s reporting of whether any of these types of orders, including interim orders, were issued by a court.