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1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2012  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 24/05/2012   
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Transport

TRANSPORT, POSTAL AND WAREHOUSING INDUSTRY

The transport, postal and warehousing industries are vital to the Australian economy, underpinning a diverse range of industries and activities. These range from transporting and storing freight, to the movement of people by private and public transport, to vehicle hire and the use of pipelines.

The contribution of an industry to the overall production of goods and services in an economy, gross domestic product (GDP), is measured by gross value added (GVA). Information on the relationship between industry GVA and GDP is provided in the Industry structure and performance chapter.

Table 24.1 shows the GVA (in volume terms) for each industry subdivision (as defined in the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006) within the Transport, postal and warehousing industry. Between 2008–09 and 2009–10, the industry’s GVA rose by 2%.

All industry subdivisions except Air and space transport had increases in GVA (in volume terms) between 2008–09 and 2009–10. Road transport recorded the greatest increase in GVA (4%), while Air and space transport decreased by 1%.


24.1 TRANSPORT, POSTAL AND WAREHOUSING INDUSTRY(a), Gross value added(b)
2008–09
2009–10
ANZSIC Subdivision
$m
$m

Road transport
19 754
20 540
Air and space transport
4 947
4 894
Rail and other transport(c)
8 953
9 006
Transport services and storage(d)
26 222
26 878
Total Transport, postal and warehousing
59 876
61 318

(a) Classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006 edition (1292.0).
(b) Volume measures where estimates are valued using prices of the reference year. Reference year is 2008–09.
(c) Includes Subdivisions Rail transport and Other transport.
(d) Includes Subdivisions Water transport, Postal and courier pick-up and delivery services, Transport support services and Warehousing and storage services.
Source: Australian System of National Accounts (5204.0).


Table 24.2 shows employment for the Transport, postal and warehousing industry. Between 2008–09 and 2009–10, the industry’s total employment decreased from 595,600 to 578,700 people. Road transport decreased by 15,700 (6.4%), and Postal and courier pick-up and delivery services fell 6,700 (6.4%). Over the same period, Transport support services rose 5,600 (8.7%).


24.2 TRANSPORT, POSTAL AND WAREHOUSING INDUSTRY(a), Employment(b)
2008–09
2009–10
ANZSIC Subdivision
'000
'000

Road transport
245.9
230.2
Rail transport
46.8
48.7
Water transport
8.7
9.4
Air and space transport
52.7
46.8
Other transport
10.0
10.8
Postal and courier pick-up and delivery services
104.5
97.8
Transport support services
64.7
70.3
Warehousing and storage services
48.0
45.0
Transport, postal and warehousing n.f.d.(c)
14.3
19.7
Total Transport, postal and warehousing
595.6
578.7

(a) Classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006 edition (1292.0).
(b) Annual average of quarterly data.
(c) Not further defined. Insufficient detail collected from survey respondent to allocate data to a specific industry code.
Source: Labour Force, Australia, Detailed, Quarterly (6291.0.55.003).


In 2009–10, the Transport, postal and warehousing industry generated $121,068 million in sales and service income (table 24.3). Capital expenditure in 2009–10 was $20,136 million, and industry value added $52,260 million. Operating profit before tax was $10,491 million, while the profit margin for the industry was 8.7% in 2009–10. The majority of businesses made a profit in 2009–10 (81%), while 17% made a loss.


24.3 TRANSPORT, POSTAL AND WAREHOUSING INDUSTRY, Selected indicators
2008–09
2009–10

Sales and service income(a)
$m
117 788
121 068
Operating profit before tax
$m
11 575
10 491
Capital expenditure(b)
$m
17 784
20 136
Industry value added
$m
49 448
52 260
Profit margin
%
9.8
8.7
Business profitability
Businesses that made a profit
%
83.2
81.4
Businesses that broke even
%
2.3
1.3
Businesses that made a loss
%
14.4
17.2

(a) Includes rent, leasing and hiring income.
(b) Includes capital work done for own use.
Source: Australian Industry (8155.0).


Transport, postal and warehousing industry production (in volume terms) increased by 27% between 2003–04 and 2010–11 (graph 24.4).

24.4 Transport, Postal and Warehousing Production(a)(b)



Wages and salaries for the Transport, postal and warehousing industry in 2009–10 were $26,846 million. Total income was $131,775 million, total expenses $121,426 million, while operating profit before tax was $10,491 million (table 24.5). Road transport was the largest component industry, with 37% of the industry's wages and salaries, 43% of operating profit before tax, 35% of total income and 35% of total expenses.


24.5 TRANSPORT, POSTAL AND WAREHOUSING INDUSTRY, Selected performance measures—2009–10
ANZSIC Subdivision
Selected indicators
Road transport
Rail transport
Water transport
Air and space transport
Other transport
Postal and courier pick-up and delivery services
Transport support services
Warehousing and storage services
Total

Wages and salaries$m
10 042
3 170
636
3 487
470
3 205
4 667
1 169
26 846
Total income$m
46 513
12 716
3 335
20 051
3 580
10 401
29 032
6 147
131 775
Total expenses$m
42 013
12 191
3 130
20 041
3 353
9 676
25 657
5 365
121 426
Operating profit before tax$m
^4 506
559
^207
**52
^232
^720
^3 437
^778
^10 491

^ estimate has a relative standard error of 10% to less than 25% and should be used with caution
** estimate has a relative standard error greater than 50% and is considered too unreliable for general use
Source: Australian Industry (8155.0).


TRANSPORT SATELLITE ACCOUNT

The System of National Accounts (SNA) consists of a coherent, consistent and integrated set of macroeconomic accounts, balance sheets and tables based on a set of internationally agreed concepts, definitions, classifications and accounting rules. While the SNA is comprehensive within the boundaries of what it measures, there are increasing demands for additional details or alternative views of various activities in the Australian economy. The SNA recognises the need for flexibility in implementing the framework to enable analysis beyond the core national accounts, and provides examples of ways in which flexibility can be applied to meet these demands. From an industry point of view, one of the key concepts of the SNA is the contribution of an industry to the overall production of goods and services in an economy, gross domestic product (GDP). This is measured by gross value added (GVA).

Satellite accounts provide a more comprehensive measure of a particular economic activity through a consistent treatment of all components of that activity throughout the economy. For example, the Transport, postal and warehousing industry in the core national accounts consists of businesses where the primary activity is in transport and/or storage. Significant transport activity occurs outside of this industry, for example in Mining, Construction and Agriculture. This activity will be covered by the estimates in the national accounts for these industries, rather than the Transport, postal and warehousing industry. While only an indicative measure of the total amount of transport activity, results from the 2009–10 Economic Activity Survey suggest significant transport activity occurring outside of the Transport, postal and warehousing industry. For example, in 2009–10, approximately 48% of business expenditure on fuel to power vehicles and 55% of business expenditure on transport and motor vehicle running expenses occurred outside of the Transport, postal and warehousing industry.

An Australian transport satellite account (TrSA) presents the opportunity to extend the focus of the core national accounts to a more detailed analysis of transport activity, using additional information from other sources of transport data. A TrSA would cover transport activities conducted on a for-hire basis (which are primarily undertaken by businesses classified to the Transport, postal and warehousing industry in the core national accounts) as well as transport activity conducted by businesses in all industries for their own use. A TrSA would provide a unified picture of the impact of transport activity on the whole economy. Transport GVA and GDP would be major economic aggregates derived from a TrSA, which would also present the opportunity to link monetary estimates of transport activity (e.g. expenditure on fuels) with non-monetary data (e.g. kilometres travelled and/or emissions).

The ABS has funded the development and collection of an additional set of transport statistics relating to the 2010–11 financial year, and has prepared a detailed outline of a TrSA framework. More information on ABS views of what a future Australian TrSA might look like is included in: Information Paper: A Future Australian Transport Satellite Account: ABS Views, 2011 (5269.0.55.001), which was released on 20 October 2011. This paper provides background to ABS research, explains the concept of a satellite account and describes the potential policy uses as well as the benefits that could be expected to result from the availability of a TrSA.

 

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Statistics contained in the Year Book are the most recent available at the time of preparation. In many cases, the ABS website and the websites of other organisations provide access to more recent data. Each Year Book table or graph and the bibliography at the end of each chapter provides hyperlinks to the most up to date data release where available.


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