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1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2012  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 24/05/2012   
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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

HOUSING INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES

HOUSING TENURE

In 2008, more than two-thirds (70%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were living in a rented property and 28% were living in a home that was owned or being purchased by a household member (table 3.34). Home ownership rates were much higher in non-remote areas (34%) than in remote areas (10%). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote areas were much more likely than those in non-remote areas to be renting (86% compared with 65%).


3.34 HOUSING TENURE, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people—2008
Non-remote areas
Remote areas
Australia
%
%
%

Owner without a mortgage
7.8
4.8
7.1
Owner with a mortgage
25.1
5.0
20.2
Participants in rent/buy schemes
*1.1
*0.5
*0.9
Total home owners
34.0
10.4
28.2
Renters
64.7
85.9
69.9
no.
no.
no.
All persons(a)
393 500
126 800
520 300

* estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to 50% and should be used with caution
(a) Includes persons in households of other tenure types.

Source: 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey.


MOVING

In 2008, an estimated 303,600 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (58%) had moved within the last five years. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in non-remote areas were more likely than those in remote areas to have moved (59% compared with 56%).

Nationally, almost half (48%) of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people had moved for housing reasons such as wanting a bigger or better home, having been asked to move by a landlord, or having been allocated housing in another area. A further three in ten Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (30%) cited family reasons, for example, moving as part of a family move or moving to be closer to family or friends, while 7% had moved for employment reasons (including moving closer to work or to improve their employment prospects). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in non-remote areas were more likely than those in remote areas to have moved for housing reasons (50% compared with 40%), but were less likely to have moved for family reasons (28% compared with 35%) or employment (6% compared with 9%) (graph 3.35).

3.35 MAIN REASON FOR MOVING IN LAST FIVE YEARS, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people



OVERCROWDING

Overcrowding in housing has been calculated using the Canadian National Occupancy Standard for housing appropriateness. This internationally accepted method determines the need for additional bedrooms in order to adequately house the occupants in a dwelling by comparing the number of bedrooms with the number, sex and age of people living in that dwelling. It does not measure the preferred living arrangements of households.

In 2008, just over one-quarter of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (27%) were living in homes requiring one or more additional bedrooms (20% in non-remote areas and 52% in remote areas) (graph 3.36). The extent to which dwellings were overcrowded also varied according to remoteness, with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in remote areas about five times as likely as those in non-remote areas to be living in a dwelling that required two or more additional bedrooms (33% compared with 6%).

3.36 EXTENT OF OVERCROWDING(a), Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people



HOUSING CONDITIONS

Factors that contribute to the appropriateness and functionality of housing include the availability of working facilities and the presence (or absence) of structural problems. In the 2008 NATSISS, household facilities included a stove or oven, fridge, toilet, bath or shower, washing machine, kitchen sink and laundry tub. One in eight Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (13%) were living in a dwelling in which at least one of these facilities was unavailable or not working and 28% were living in a dwelling that had major structural problems (table 3.37). Just over one-third of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (35%) were living in a dwelling that had at least one of these deficits, and 7% in a dwelling that had both types of problems. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote areas were significantly more likely than those in non-remote areas to be living in a dwelling in which at least one facility was unavailable or not working (27% compared with 8%) or in a dwelling that had major structural problems (39% compared with 25%). They were also four times as likely to be living in a dwelling that had both of these types of problems (15% compared with 4%).


3.37 HOUSING CONDITIONS, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people—2008
Non-remote areas
Remote areas
Australia
%
%
%

Problems with housing
At least one facility is unavailable or does not work
8.4
26.7
12.9
Dwelling has major structural problems
24.9
38.7
28.2
At least one facility is unavailable or does not work and dwelling has major structural problems
3.7
15.5
6.6
Either/both one facility is unavailable or does not work/dwelling has major structural problems
29.6
50.0
34.6
Living in a dwelling that has neither of these problems
70.4
50.0
65.4
no.
no.
no.
All persons
393 500
126 800
520 300

Source: 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey.


ACCESS TO COMMUNITY FACILITIES

Community facilities play an important role in aspects of individual and collective wellbeing. Such facilities contribute to social cohesion; encourage participation in sport, recreational activity, and education; and support a healthy living environment. Nationally, nine out of ten Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people had access to outdoor playing fields and play areas, schools, supermarkets or shops with fresh food, and a petrol station (table 3.38). Similar proportions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in non-remote areas and remote areas had access to Aboriginal health care services, schools, supermarkets/shops and emergency services (such as ambulance and flying doctor services). However, a higher proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in non-remote areas than in remote areas had access to most other services and facilities, including a pharmacy (91% compared with 41%), taxi service (85% compared with 42%), school bus service (89% compared with 58%) and swimming pool (82% compared with 57%).


3.38 COMMUNITY FACILITIES AVAILABLE LOCALLY WHEN NEEDED(a)(b), Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people—2008
Non-remote areas
Remote areas
Australia
%
%
%

Medical services
Aboriginal health care service(c)
62.3
62.7
62.4
Hospital
76.3
55.1
71.1
Any other health or medical clinic
85.1
65.1
80.3
Pharmacy/chemist
90.9
41.1
78.8
Sporting and recreation facilities
Outdoor playing fields and play areas
95.7
92.0
94.8
Swimming pool
82.1
57.2
76.0
Indoor sports centre for games
77.3
55.7
72.0
Other services and community facilities
Community hall/centre
87.7
74.7
84.5
Schools(c)
94.8
93.1
94.4
Supermarket/shop with fresh food(c)
94.6
91.5
93.8
Petrol station
95.0
82.0
91.9
Police station
85.4
77.9
83.6
Emergency service(c)
79.6
77.0
79.0
School bus service
88.5
58.4
81.2
Taxi service
85.1
42.2
74.6
no.
no.
no.
All persons
393 500
126 800
520 300

(a) Available at the suburb, town, or community level.
(b) Respondents could report more than one locally available community facility or service.
(c) Difference between non-remote and remote rate is not statistically significant.

Source: 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey.


Information on housing assistance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can be found in chapter 10 HOUSING.

 

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Statistics contained in the Year Book are the most recent available at the time of preparation. In many cases, the ABS website and the websites of other organisations provide access to more recent data. Each Year Book table or graph and the bibliography at the end of each chapter provides hyperlinks to the most up to date data release where available.


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