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1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2012  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 24/05/2012   
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Energy

ENERGY USE

In 2009–10, Australia's total domestic energy use, including losses and conversions (5,925 PJ), was one-third of the total energy produced (17,282 PJ) (diagram 19.4). Over the period 1979–80 to 2009–10, there was a 90% increase in Australia's total energy use, from 3,131 petajoules to 5,925 petajoules (graph 19.11).

19.11 TOTAL ENERGY USE


ENERGY END-USE BY SECTOR AND INDUSTRY

In 2009–10, Australia's end-users of energy, comprising Australian households and industries (excluding conversions and losses), used 3,962 petajoules of energy, an increase of 1% on the previous year (3,923 PJ) (table 19.12). Total net energy use by industry accounted for three-quarters of the energy use (2,947 PJ), with households accounting for the other quarter (1,015 PJ).

The Manufacturing industry was the largest end-user of energy by industry, using 1,034 petajoules in 2009–10. Non-ferrous metals manufacturing accounted for 35% (365 PJ) of manufacturing energy use, with the next largest contributor being Petroleum and chemicals products manufacturing (21%),

In 2009–10, the Transport, postal and warehousing industry was the second largest end user of energy by industry, at 18% (544 PJ), closely followed by the Mining industry at 18% (543 PJ).


19.12 ENERGY END-USE, By sector and industry

2008–09
2009–10
Change from 2008–09 to 2009–10
Sector and industry(a)
PJ
PJ
%

Agriculture, forestry and fishing
107
109
1.9
Mining
519
543
4.6
Manufacturing
Food, beverages, tobacco and textiles (Subdivisions 11, 12 and 13)
127
125
–1.6
Wood, paper and printing (Subdivisions 14, 15 and 16)
80
84
5.0
Petroleum and chemical products (Subdivisions 17, 18 and 19)
232
222
–4.3
Iron and steel (Groups 211 and 212)
63
75
19.0
Non-ferrous metals (Groups 213 and 214)
379
365
–3.7
Other manufacturing
160
163
1.9
Total Manufacturing
1 041
1 034
–0.7
Electricity, gas, water and waste services
150
146
–2.7
Construction
144
144
0.0
Transport, postal and warehousing
Road
166
171
3.0
Rail
38
38
0.0
Air and space
232
247
6.5
Water
43
36
–16.3
Other transport, postal and warehousing (Subdivisions 50–53)
51
51
0.0
Total Transport, postal and warehousing
531
544
2.4
Other services
Wholesale and retail trade
123
121
–1.6
Accommodation and food services
57
57
0.0
Information, financial, rental and professional services(b)
138
137
–0.7
Administrative, education, health, arts and other services(c)(d)
115
114
–0.9
Total Other services
433
429
–0.9
Total All industries
2 926
2 947
0.7
Households
997
1 015
1.8
Total
3 923
3 962
1.0

(a) Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006 edition (1292.0). Some industries have been re-aggregated at Subdivision or Group level as shown in the table.
(b) Includes Information media and telecommunications; Financial and insurance services; Rental, hiring and real estate services; and Professional, scientific and technical services.
(c) Includes Administrative and support services; Public administration and safety; Education and training; Health care and social assistance; Arts and recreational services; and Other services.
(d) Includes General government.

Source:
Energy Account Australia, 2009–10 (4604.0).


ENERGY END-USE BY PRODUCT

Table 19.13 shows the major energy products consumed for final purposes in Australia. Intermediate purposes are not reported in the table; for example, the consumption of fossil fuels used in the generation of electricity is not reported because those fuels are transformed in the generation process. If both the energy content of the fossil fuel and the energy content of the electricity were included, this would result in double counting.

The main fuels consumed in Australia's net domestic energy consumption in 2009–10 were Natural gas (24%), Electricity (22%), Diesel (18%) and Petrol (16%).

The net energy use by households of 1,015 petajoules consisted of Petrol (457 PJ), Electricity (217 PJ) and Natural gas (144 PJ).

The main fuels used in the net use of energy by the Manufacturing industry (1,034 PJ) were Natural gas (399 PJ), Electricity (241 PJ), Black coal (99 PJ) and Renewable energy (71 PJ).

The Mining and Transport, postal and warehousing industries each accounted for 14% of domestic energy use in 2009–10. The main fuels consumed by the Mining industry were Natural gas (314 PJ) and Diesel (147 PJ). The main fuels used in transport were Other refined fuels and products (290 PJ, mainly aviation turbine fuel used in air transport) and Diesel (202 PJ), used largely in road transport.

Of the net use of renewable energy, Food, beverages, tobacco and textiles manufacturing used 34 petajoules of renewable energy in the form of bagasse, and the Wood, paper and printing industries used 29 petajoules in the form of wood and waste products. Households used 10 petajoules of solar energy in the form of solar electricity and solar hot water.


19.13 ENERGY NET END-USE BY PRODUCT2009–10

Black coal
Natural gas
Electricity(b)
Diesel
Petrol
Renewable energy(c)
Other(d)
Sector and industry(a)
PJ
PJ
PJ
PJ
PJ
PJ
PJ

Agriculture, forestry and fishing
8
92
7
2
Mining
4
314
64
147
2
1
11
Manufacturing
99
399
241
33
17
71
174
Electricity, gas, water and waste services
14
121
9
3
Construction
3
96
39
6
Transport, postal and warehousing
20
14
202
10
8
290
Other services(a)
48
206
63
93
1
18
Total All industries
104
798
653
642
170
81
502
Households
144
217
82
457
67
47
Total
104
942
870
724
627
148
549

– nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)
(a) Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006 edition (1292.0). For definition of Other services, see table 19.12.
(b) Includes electricity generated from all sources, but excludes conversion losses in generating electricity from fossil fuels and transmission and distribution losses.
(c) Includes biofuels, wood and wood waste, bagasse and solar energy. Excludes renewable fuels used to generate electricity and the consumption of electricity from those sources.
(d) includes other refined fuels and products (mainly aviation turbine fuel), LPG, crude oil and refinery feedstock, coal by-products, coke and briquettes.
Source: Energy Account Australia, 2009–10 (4604.0).


ENERGY INTENSITY

The energy intensity of an industry is a measure of the energy consumed to produce one unit of economic output. Differences in energy intensity reflect different production processes and the efficiency of energy use within the production input mix. In 2009–10, the Manufacturing industry at 9,600 gigajoules/$m industry gross value added (GJ/$m IGVA) was the most energy intensive industry within the Australian economy, followed by Transport (8,291 GJ/$m IGVA) and Mining (5,651 GJ/$m IGVA) (graph 19.14).

19.14 ENERGY INTENSITY, By industry—2008-09 and 2009-10


 

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Statistics contained in the Year Book are the most recent available at the time of preparation. In many cases, the ABS website and the websites of other organisations provide access to more recent data. Each Year Book table or graph and the bibliography at the end of each chapter provides hyperlinks to the most up to date data release where available.


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