4234.0 - Work-Related Training and Adult Learning, Australia, 2016-17 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 20/12/2017   
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OCCUPATION AND INDUSTRY

In 2016-17, around 3.4 million (28.2%) of employed persons aged 15-74 years participated in work-related training as part of their current main job. The rate of participation of employed persons has dropped from 34.5% in 2013.

EMPLOYMENT STATUS

People employed full-time were more likely to participate in work-related training than those employed part-time (30.2% compared with 24.1%). Since 2013, the training participation rate has decreased from 37.7% for full-time employees and 27.3% for part-time workers.

Occupation

Those employed as professionals were almost twice as likely to participate in work-related training compared to technicians or trade workers (41.4% compared with 21.0%).

    Table 1: Participation in work-related training by occupation of current job, 2005, 2013 and 2016-17 (a)

    Year(b)(c)Change

    2013
    2016-17(d)
    Difference
    %

    Managers
    36.5
    29.1
    -7.4pts
    -20.3%
    Professionals
    50.1
    41.4
    -8.7pts
    -17.4%
    Technicians and trades workers
    27.0
    21.0
    -6.0pts
    -22.2%
    Community and personal service workers
    46.8
    38.4
    -8.4pts
    -17.9%
    Clerical and administrative workers
    29.3
    23.3
    -6.0pts
    -20.5%
    Sales workers
    24.4
    19.7
    -4.7pts
    -19.3%
    Machinery operators and drivers
    24.5
    21.4
    (e)-3.1pts
    (e)-12.7%
    Labourers
    20.2
    12.6
    -7.6pts
    -37.6%

    (a) Participation in the 12 months prior to survey; persons aged 15 to 74 years.
    (b) There were changes in collection methods between the surveys in 2013 and 2016-17. See the Explanatory notes for details.
    (c) Education and Training Experience, Australia, 2005 and Work-Related Training and Adult Learning, Australia, 2013 and 2016-17.
    (d) Data from 2016-17 has been randomly adjusted to avoid the release of confidential data. Discrepancies may occur between sums of the component items and totals.
    (e) The difference between periods is not statistically significant. See the Significance Testing article in this publication for more information: http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/6227.0.55.002

Some occupations showed substantial variability in rates of work-related training by sex. Men were more likely to undertake work-related training than women if employed as Labourers (13.9% compared with 10.3%) and Machinery operators and drivers (21.3% compared with 14.8%). Conversely, women were more likely to participate if they were Professionals (45.9% compared with 36.6%).

Employment type

Employees were more likely to participate in work-related training than people running their own business (30.6% compared with 15.8%) which has decreased from 2013 participation rates of 36.5% and 17.3% respectively.

Participation in work-related training varied with the size of the employer. People employed in larger businesses (100 employees or more) were more likely to have participated in work-related training (37.8%) compared with people employed in medium sized (20-99 employees) (28.4%) and smaller (less than 20 employees) (15.3%) businesses. Since 2013, rates of participation have dropped across all three business sizes (from 46.1%, 32.9% and 19.8% respectively).

Of those who participated in work-related training for their current job, those working in larger businesses were more likely to have completed three or more work-related training courses (50.5%) when compared with those with 20-99 employees (37.0%) and less than 20 employees (34.5%).

Industry

Since 2013, all industries, except Other services, have seen a decrease in participation in work-related training.


    Table 2: Participation in work-related training by industry of current job, 2005, 2013 and 2016-17(a)

    Year(b)(c)Change

    2013
    2016-17(d)
    Difference
    %

    Agriculture, forestry and fishing
    15.5
    10.6
    -4.9pts
    -31.6%
    Mining
    52.5
    36.9
    (e)-15.6pts
    (e)-29.7%
    Manufacturing
    26.5
    22.1
    (e)-4.4pts
    (e)-16.6%
    Electricity, gas, water and waste services
    47.3
    46.2
    (e)-1.1pts
    (e)-2.3%
    Construction
    23.7
    14.7
    (e)-9.0pts
    (e)-38.0%
    Wholesale trade
    21.1
    17.5
    -3.6pts
    -17.1%
    Retail trade
    23.5
    17.6
    (e)-5.9pts
    (e)-25.1%
    Accommodation and food services
    19.9
    17.1
    -2.8pts
    -14.1%
    Transport, postal and warehousing
    28.8
    23.1
    -5.7pts
    -19.8%
    Information media and telecommunications
    34.9
    25.7
    (e)-9.2pts
    (e)-26.4%
    Financial and insurance services
    47.8
    39.0
    -8.8pts
    -18.4%
    Rental, hiring and real estate services
    38.7
    27.8
    (e)-10.9pts
    (e)-28.2%
    Professional, scientific and technical services
    36.1
    26.5
    -9.6pts
    -26.6%
    Administrative and support services
    20.2
    13.0
    (e)-7.2pts
    (e)-35.6%
    Public administration and safety
    53.2
    47.3
    -5.9pts
    -11.1%
    Education and training
    53.8
    46.6
    -7.2pts
    -13.4%
    Health care and social assistance
    52.0
    43.4
    -8.6pts
    -16.5%
    Arts and recreation services
    38.5
    28.1
    (e)-10.4pts
    (e)-27.0%
    Other services
    22.6
    23.3
    (e)0.7pts
    (e)3.1%

    (a) Participation in the 12 months prior to survey; persons aged 15 to 74 years.
    (b) There were changes in collection methods between the surveys in 2013 and 2016-17. See the Explanatory notes for details.
    (c) Education and Training Experience, Australia, 2005 and Work-Related Training and Adult Learning, Australia, 2013 and 2016-17.
    (d) Data from 2016-17 has been randomly adjusted to avoid the release of confidential data. Discrepancies may occur between sums of the component items and totals.
    (e) The difference between periods is not statistically significant. See the Significance Testing article in this publication for more information: http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/6227.0.55.002