4234.0 - Work-Related Training and Adult Learning, Australia, 2016-17 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 20/12/2017   
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PARTICIPATION IN WORK-RELATED TRAINING

WHAT IS WORK RELATED TRAINING?

Work-related training refers to structured learning activities that do not lead to a formal qualification. These often take place at the workplace (delivered by another employee or a consultant hired to deliver the work-related training) or can be undertaken externally. For more information about learning that results in the award of a formal qualification, see Education and Work, Australia, May 2017.

PARTICIPATION IN WORK-RELATED TRAINING

Around 3.8 million (21.5%) Australians aged 15-74 years participated in work-related training in 2016-17. This was a decrease from 2013 (26.9%) and 2005 (35.9%). People who are employed (30.5%) have higher participation rates in work-related training than those who are unemployed (9.6%) or not in the labour force (2.5%).

In 2016-17, men and women reported equal rates of participation in work-related training (21.5%). Work-related training participation rates were lowest for those aged 15-24 years (10.6%) and 65-74 years (4.5%). This reflects lower rates of employment in these age group.

Graph Image for Graph 1 - Participation in work-related training by age groups, 2005, 2013 and 2016-17(a)(b)(c)

Footnote(s): (a)There were changes in collection methods between the surveys in 2005, 2013 and 2016-17. See the Explanatory notes for details. (b) Persons aged 65-74 years permanently not intending to work, and all respondents who were permanently unable to work, were not asked about work-related training and are included as not participating. (c) Data from 2016-17 has been randomly adjusted to avoid the release of confidential data. Discrepancies may occur between sums of the component items and totals.

Source(s): Education and Training Experience, Australia, 2005 and Work-Related Training and Adult Learning, Australia, 2013 and 2016-17



Across Australia in 2016-17, the Australian Capital Territory had the highest rate of people participating in work-related training (31.7%) while Queensland had the lowest participation rate (17.8%). Participation across all States and Territories has decreased since 2005.

Graph Image for Graph 2 - Participation in work-related training by state and territory, 2005, 2013 and 2016-17(a)(b)(c)(d)

Footnote(s): (a) There were changes in collection methods between the surveys in 2005, 2013 and 2016-17. See the Explanatory notes for details. (b) Participation in the 12 months prior to survey; persons aged 15 to 74 years. (c) Persons aged 65-74 years permanently not intending to work, and all respondents who were permanently unable to work, were not asked about work-related training and are included as not participating. (d) Data from 2016-17 has been randomly adjusted to avoid the release of confidential data. Discrepancies may occur between sums of the component items and totals.

Source(s): Education and Training Experience, Australia, 2005 and Work-Related Training and Adult Learning, Australia, 2013 and 2016-17



Rates of work related training participation are relatively similar across major cities (21.4%), inner regional (22.7%) and outer regional and remote Australia (20.5%). Participation in 2016-17 across all remoteness areas has decreased since 2005.

Graph Image for Graph 3 - Participation in work-related training by remote area, 2005, 2013 and 2016-17(a)(b)(c)(d)

Footnote(s): (a) There were changes in collection methods between the surveys in 2005, 2013 and 2016-17. See the Explanatory notes for details. (b) Participation in the 12 months prior to survey; persons aged 15 to 74 years. (c) Persons aged 65-74 years permanently not intending to work, and all respondents who were permanently unable to work, were not asked about work-related training and are included as not participating. (d) Data from 2016-17 has been randomly adjusted to avoid the release of confidential data. Discrepancies may occur between sums of the component items and totals.

Source(s): Education and Training Experience, Australia, 2005 and Work-Related Training and Adult Learning, Australia, 2013 and 2016-17



People living in areas with the most socio-economic disadvantage (Quintile 1) were less likely to participate in work-related training than those in the least disadvantaged areas. Work related training participation in 2016-17 across all levels of disadvantage has decreased since 2005. The fall in participation is larger (in absolute terms) in the least disadvantaged areas.

Graph Image for Graph 4 - Participation in work-related training by socio-economic disadvantage, 2005, 2013 and 2016-17(a)(b)(c)(d)

Footnote(s): (a) There were changes in collection methods between the surveys in 2005, 2013 and 2016-17. See the Explanatory notes for details. (b) Participation in the 12 months prior to survey; persons aged 15 to 74 years. (c) Persons aged 65-74 years permanently not intending to work, and all respondents who were permanently unable to work, were not asked about work-related training and are included as not participating. (d) Data from 2016-17 has been randomly adjusted to avoid the release of confidential data. Discrepancies may occur between sums of the component items and totals.

Source(s): Education and Training Experience, Australia, 2005 and Work-Related Training and Adult Learning, Australia, 2013 and 2016-17



People who have completed a formal non-school qualification participated in more work-related training than people who had not (28.0% compared with 11.8%). Furthermore, people with higher level qualifications were generally more likely to participate in work-related training when compared with those with lower level qualifications. Of those people whose highest qualification was a Bachelor Degree, one in three (33.1%) had participated in work-related training, compared with less than one in eight (11.8%) whose highest non-school qualification was a Certificate I or II. Participation across all levels of highest non-school qualification has decreased significantly since 2005.

Graph Image for Graph 5 - Participation in work-related training by non-school qualification, 2005, 2013 and 2016-17(a)(b)(c)(d)

Footnote(s): (a) There were changes in collection methods between the surveys in 2005, 2013 and 2016-17. See the Explanatory notes for details. (b) Participation in the 12 months prior to survey; persons aged 15 to 74 years. (c) Persons aged 65-74 years permanently not intending to work, and all respondents who were permanently unable to work, were not asked about work-related training and are included as not participating. (d) Data from 2016-17 has been randomly adjusted to avoid the release of confidential data. Discrepancies may occur between sums of the component items and totals.

Source(s): Education and Training Experience, Australia, 2005 and Work-Related Training and Adult Learning, Australia, 2013 and 2016-17



Participation in work related training has decreased across all fields of study since 2005. More recently, however, training participation has increased since 2013 for those with Education and Health qualifications.

Graph Image for Graph 6 - Participation in work-related training by field of non-school qualification, 2005, 2013 and 2016-17(a)(b)(c)(d)

Footnote(s): (a) There were changes in collection methods between the surveys in 2005, 2013 and 2016-17. See the Explanatory notes for details. (b) Participation in the 12 months prior to survey; persons aged 15 to 74 years. (c) Persons aged 65-74 years permanently not intending to work, and all respondents who were permanently unable to work, were not asked about work-related training and are included as not participating. (d) Data from 2016-17 has been randomly adjusted to avoid the release of confidential data. Discrepancies may occur between sums of the component items and totals.

Source(s): Education and Training Experience, Australia, 2005 and Work-Related Training and Adult Learning, Australia, 2013 and 2016-17