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1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2002  
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Contents >> Forestry and Fishing >> Production, processing, and exports & imports of fisheries products

Value of fisheries production

Australia's major commercially accessed species are prawns, rock lobster, abalone, tuna, other fin fish, scallops, and edible and pearl oysters. Australian fishing operators concentrate their efforts on estuarine, coastal, pelagic (surface) species and demersal (bottom living) species that occur on the continental shelf.

Table 17.5 shows the quantity and table 17.6 the gross value of the production of the Australian commercial fishing industry. Australian fisheries production covers total production from both Commonwealth and State managed fisheries and from aquaculture. Gross value of production is the value placed on recorded production at the wholesale price realised in the principal markets. In general, the principal markets are the metropolitan markets in each State. However, in cases where commodities are consumed locally or where they become raw material for a secondary industry, these points are treated as the principal markets.

The gross value of Australian fisheries production (including aquaculture) rose by 13% ($261m) in 1999-2000, to $2.3b (table 17.7) following on from a 9% increase the previous year. Contributing to this latest rise was a 39% increase in the value of abalone production and a 30% increase in the value of rock lobster catches (table 17.8). Other significant increases in the value of production occurred in tuna (16%) and oysters (16%). In quantity terms there was a 7% fall over the year in Australian fisheries production to 221,000 tonnes, with the falls in prawn production (17%) and other fin fish (10%), more than cancelling the increases in oysters (21%) and rock lobster (5%) (table 17.9).

Commonwealth fisheries accounted for 18% of the total value of Australian fisheries production in 1999-2000 (table 17.6). Commonwealth fisheries are those managed for the Commonwealth Government by the Australian Fisheries Management Authority. State Governments manage inland fisheries and aquaculture, in addition to those salt water fisheries not managed by the Commonwealth. The distribution of the management of fisheries between the Commonwealth and the States is determined following consultations held under the Offshore Constitutional Settlement Agreement.


17.5 AUSTRALIAN FISHERIES PRODUCTION, By State(a) - 1999-2000

NSW

tonnes
Vic.

tonnes
Qld

tonnes
SA

tonnes
WA

tonnes
Tas.

tonnes
NT

tonnes
C’wealth(b)

tonnes
Aust.

tonnes

Fish
Tuna
31
-
-
7,803
33
-
8
(c)13,473
(d)16,218
Other
9,734
4,207
10,920
8,406
16,164
15,742
3,606
(e)44,521
113,302
Total
9,765
4,207
10,920
16,209
16,197
15,742
3,614
57,994
129,520
Crustaceans
Prawns
2,353
104
8,687
2,416
4,474
-
-
(f)7,830
25,864
Rock lobster
113
543
463
2,721
14,599
1,466
-
359
20,264
Other
594
76
3,568
644
1,054
78
998
262
7,274
Total
3,060
723
12,718
5,781
20,127
1,544
999
8,452
53,403
Molluscs
Abalone
305
1,418
na
889
331
2,565
-
-
5,508
Scallops
-
346
7,398
-
2,756
423
2
22
10,947
Oysters
5,584
-
143
2,494
-
4,748
-
-
12,969
Other
1146
1145
209
1938
985
807
1,043
(g)1,447
8,720
Total
7,035
2,909
7,750
5,321
4,072
8,543
1,045
1,469
38,144
Total quantity
19,860
7,839
31,388
27,648
40,396
25,829
5,657
67,915
221,405

(a) Includes estimates of aquaculture production (except Northern Territory); excludes production of pearl oysters, and hatchery and inland commercial fishery production.
(b) Total includes all fisheries under federal jurisdiction.
(c) Includes the southern bluefin, eastern tuna and billfish, southern and western tuna fisheries.
(d) Total has been adjusted to allow for southern bluefin tuna caught in the Commonwealth southern bluefin tuna fishery, as an input to farms in South Australia.
(e) Includes the fish component of Commonwealth fisheries, plus catch from Commonwealth fisheries that cannot be disaggregated due to confidentiality reasons.
(f) Includes the northern prawn, Torres Strait, south east and other fisheries.
(g) Includes squid, octopus and cuttlefish from the south east and Great Australian Bight fisheries, and pearl oyster from the Torres Strait fishery.

Source: 'Australian Fisheries Statistics, 2000', Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics.


17.6 GROSS VALUE OF AUSTRALIAN FISHERIES PRODUCTION, By State(a) - 1999-2000

NSW

$’000
Vic.

$’000
Qld

$’000
SA

$’000
WA

$’000
Tas.

$’000
NT

$’000
C’wealth(b)

$’000
Aust.

$’000

Fish
Tuna
83
-
-
202,295
200
-
38
(c)106,095
(d)254,840
Other
31,897
20,742
65,385
20,617
41,895
90,222
16,226
(e)160,935
447,929
Total
31,980
20,742
65,385
222,912
42,095
90,222
16,264
267,030
702,769
Crustaceans
Prawns
30,305
1,306
119,929
43,771
76,735
-
-
(f)135,684
407,730
Rock lobster
4,151
17,326
5,519
81,038
385,441
45,680
-
5,390
544,545
Other
4,679
983
20,353
3,827
8,406
1,954
12,062
2,457
54,721
Total
39,135
19,615
145,801
128,636
470,582
47,634
12,062
143,530
1,006,995
Molluscs
Abalone
10,668
57,743
na
32,394
35,310
99,513
-
-
235,628
Scallops
-
642
18,068
-
14,471
5,280
5
91
38,557
Oysters
28,813
-
650
9,309
-
13,176
-
-
51,948
Other
4,438
3,019
1,853
5,466
205,032
3,137
3,353
(g)2,095
228,393
Total
43,919
61,404
20,571
47,169
254,813
121,106
3,358
2,186
554,526
Total value
115,034
101,761
231,757
401,638
767,590
258,962
(h)86,684
412,749
2,322,305

(a) Includes estimates of the value of aquaculture production, but excludes the value of hatchery and inland commercial fishery production.
(b) Total includes all fisheries under federal jurisdiction.

(c) Includes the southern bluefin, eastern tuna and billfish, southern and western tuna fisheries.
(d) Total has been adjusted to allow for southern bluefin tuna caught in the Commonwealth southern bluefin tuna fishery, as an input to farms in South Australia.
(e) Includes the fish component of the Commonwealth fisheries.
(f) Includes the northern prawn, Torres Strait, south east and other fisheries.
(g) Includes squid, octopus and cuttlefish from the south east and Great Australian Bight fisheries, and pearl oyster from the Torres Strait fishery.
(h) Northern Territory aquaculture has been aggregated for reasons of confidentiality. Total only sums across.

Source: 'Australian Fisheries Statistics, 2000', Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics.


17.7 GROSS VALUE OF FISHERIES PRODUCTION(a)

Value

$m

1980-81
330
1981-82
344
1982-83
423
1983-84
449
1984-85
522
1985-86
635
1986-87
702
1987-88
828
1988-89
1,022
1989-90
1,092
1990-91
1,223
1991-92
1,376
1992-93
1,493
1993-94
1,679
1994-95
1,813
1995-96
1,690
1996-97
1,776
1997-98
1,883
1998-99
1999-2000
2,061
2,322

(a) Includes estimates of the value of aquaculture production, but excludes the value of hatchery and inland commercial fishery production.

Source: 'Australian Fisheries Statistics, 2000', Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics.


17.8 GROSS VALUE OF SELECTED FISHERY PRODUCTS(a)

1997-98

$m
1998-99

$m
1999-2000

$m

Prawns
385
417
408
Rock lobster
377
418
545
Tuna
131
220
255
Other fin fish
396
428
448
Abalone
182
170
236
Scallops
39
37
39
Oysters
47
45
52
Pearls (b)
189
183
191
Other n.e.i. (c)
137
143
148
Total
1,883
2,061
2,322

(a) Includes estimates of the value of aquaculture production, but excludes the value of hatchery and inland commercial fishery production.
(b) Excludes Northern Territory.
(c) Includes pearl oysters and aquaculture for the Northern Territory

Source: 'Australian Fisheries Statistics, 2000', Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics.


17.9 AUSTRALIAN FISHERIES PRODUCTION, By Category(a)

1997-98

tonnes
1998-99

tonnes
1999-2000

tonnes

Fish
Tuna
11,890
16,728
16,218
Other
134,287
125,270
113,302
Total
146,177
141,998
129,520
Crustaceans
Prawns
29,603
31,182
25,864
Rock lobster
16,616
19,224
20,264
Other
7,498
6,537
7,274
Total
53,717
56,943
53,403
Molluscs
Abalone
5,226
5,614
5,508
Scallops
5,759
11,621
10,947
Oysters
10,499
10,731
12,969
Other
7,594
9,481
8,720
Total
29,078
37,447
38,144
Total
229,351
236,800
221,405

(a) Includes estimates of aquaculture production (except Northern Territory); excludes production of pearl oysters, and hatchery and inland commercial fishery production.

Source: 'Australian Fisheries Statistics, 2000', Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics.


Aquaculture, or 'fish farming', is an alternative to harvesting the naturally occurring fish stocks, and has considerable potential as a means of ensuring sustainability of harvesting yields. Aquaculture industries are established in all States, with species involved ranging from pearl oysters to freshwater trout. Aquaculture has experienced rapid growth over recent years, with the value of production rising from $188m in 1989-90 to $678m in 1999-2000, a 260% increase.

In 1999-2000 the value of Australian aquaculture production increased by $74.1m (12%) (table 17.10). Aquaculture accounted for 29% of the total value of Australian fisheries production in 1999-2000, the same as the previous year. The increase in the value of aquaculture production was mainly due to a $36m (21%) rise in the value of tuna production, with salmon and prawn increasing $13.3m (19%) and $9.5m (23%) respectively.


17.10 GROSS VALUE OF AQUACULTURE PRODUCTION(a)

1997-98

$m
1998-99

$m
1999-2000

$m

Fish
Salmon
63.6
71.5
84.8
Tuna
87.2
166.7
202.3
Trout
11.2
11.8
12.4
Other(b)
11.4
13.7
14.5
Total
173.4
263.8
314.1
Crustaceans
Prawn
38.0
42.2
51.7
Other(c)
5.0
4.5
5.8
Total
43.0
46.7
57.5
Molluscs
Pearl oysters
189.4
182.6
190.5
Edible oysters
47.0
45.2
51.9
Other(d)
4.8
7.6
6.3
Total
241.2
235.4
248.7
Total(e)(f)
506.0
604.2
678.3

(a) Excludes aquarium fish, hatcheries production, crocodiles, microalgae and aquarium worms.
(b) Includes eels and other native fish.
(c) Includes crabs and brine shrimp.
(d) Includes mussels, scallops and giant clams.
(e) Includes Northern Territory aquaculture production which has been aggregated due to confidentiality reasons.
(f) Includes production of species in South Australia unable to be assigned to a specific category.

Source: 'Australian Fisheries Statistics, 2000', Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics.


Table 17.11 shows the volume of Australian aquaculture production for the three years 1997-98 to 1999-2000, with the latest year showing a 19% increase in total. Edible oysters accounted for the most aquaculture production in 1999-2000 with 12,969 tonnes, a 21% increase on the previous year. Salmon and tuna production in 1999-2000 increased by 19% and 23% to 10,907 tonnes and 7,803 tonnes respectively.


17.11 AUSTRALIAN AQUACULTURE PRODUCTION(a)

1997-98

tonnes
1998-99

tonnes
1999-2000

tonnes

Fish
Salmon
7,069
9,195
10,907
Trout
1,438
1,646
1,942
Tuna
5,140
6,365
7,803
Other(b)
1,023
1,164
1,295
Total
14,670
18,370
21,947
Crustaceans
Prawn
2,059
2,319
2,950
Yabbies
306
245
290
Marron
48
49
52
Other(c)
60
78
77
Total
2,473
2,691
3,369
Molluscs
Edible oysters
10,499
10,731
12,969
Other(d)
1,456
2,024
2,010
Total
11,955
12,755
14,979
Total(e)
29,477
34,228
40,632

(a) Excludes Northern Territory.
(b) Includes eels and other native fish.
(c) Includes crabs and brine shrimp.
(d) Includes mussels, scallops and giant clams.
(e) Includes production of species in South Australia unable to be assigned to a specific category.

Source: 'Australian Fisheries Statistics, 2000', Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics.


Processing of fish, crustaceans and molluscs

In Australia very little processing of fish products is undertaken which adds value to the product. Processing establishments vary in size, scope of operations and sophistication of technologies employed. The majority of establishments undertake only the most basic cleaning, filleting, chilling, freezing and packaging processes, but some have the capacity for significant product transformation. Much of the value that is added to the catch is due to correct handling and quick delivery by air to local or overseas markets.

Fish, crustaceans and molluscs intended for export are processed in establishments registered under the Export (Fish) Regulations. Edible fish for local consumption are mainly sent fresh-chilled to markets.


Exports and imports

Exports of fisheries products come under Commonwealth jurisdiction, while domestic market activity is the responsibility of the States and Territories.

A significant proportion of Australian fisheries production (edible and non-edible) is exported. In 1999-2000, the value of exports rose by 31% to almost $2.0b (table 17.12). About one-third of the increase is due to a $164m increase in pearl exports, most of which can be attributed to all pearls exported on consignment being classified as merchandise trade. Similarly, all imports including those previously exported and not sold are now also classified as merchandise trade , resulting in an increase of similar proportions in total imports of fisheries products. The value of rock lobster exports increased by 28% to $578m, making rock lobster Australia's highest value edible fisheries export in 1999-2000, accounting for 29% of total fisheries products exported. Prawns and abalone were the next largest fisheries exports, worth $244m and $223m respectively. For some fisheries categories the value of exports exceeds the value of production, because exports are valued on a free on board (f.o.b.) basis which includes the value of packaging and distribution services to the point of export.

Japan continued to be the major destination for Australian exports of fisheries products, accounting for 35% of the total value in 1999-2000. Hong Kong and Taiwan accounted for the next largest shares of exported Australian fisheries products, with 19% and 11% respectively of total export value. The value of exports to the United States continued to rise in 1999-2000, a 30% increase following on from a 31% increase the previous year. On the other hand, exports of fisheries products to China fell $62m and are now only one-third of the 1997-98 level.

Western Australia continued to have the highest value of seafood (i.e. edible fisheries products) exports with $526m, or 34% of Australian seafood exports, due mainly to its domination of rock lobster exports (73%). South Australia, the next largest exporter of seafood by value, moved shipments worth $394m, and was the State earning the most from fish exports ($211m). Queensland was the State earning the most from prawn exports.


17.12 DESTINATION OF EXPORTS OF AUSTRALIAN FISHERIES PRODUCTS(a)

1997-98

1998-99

1999-2000

Country
$m
%
$m
%
$m
%

Japan
483
32.8
462
30.8
680
34.6
Hong Kong (SAR of China)
245
16.6
248
16.6
368
18.7
Taiwan
179
12.2
170
11.4
211
10.7
United States of America
110
7.5
144
9.6
187
9.5
Singapore
41
2.8
43
2.9
60
3.1
China
120
8.2
104
6.9
42
2.1
Switzerland
9
0.6
31
2.1
26
1.3
France
6
0.4
14
0.9
21
1.1
Spain
13
0.9
23
1.5
19
1.0
New Zealand
14
1.0
14
0.9
16
0.8
United Kingdom
5
0.3
7
0.5
13
0.7
Thailand
14
1.0
11
0.7
8
0.4
Other
235
16.0
227
15.2
314
16.0
Total
1 473
100.0
1 498
100.0
1 964
100.0
(a) Includes non-edible products (e.g. marine fats and oils, fish meal, pearls and ornamental fish). Excludes sea products landed abroad directly from the high seas.

Source: ABS data available on request, International Trade database.

The total value of Australian imports of fisheries products increased by 24% in 1999-2000, to an estimated $1,092m (table 17.13), although Australia remained a net exporter of fisheries products. Easily the biggest contributor to this rise was the value of imports of pearls, which trebled to $225m; as already indicated, this is mainly due to a revision in the treatment of trade data. Imports of frozen fillets (worth $175m) increased by 11% to remain in value terms the largest edible fisheries product imported, accounting for 16% of the total value of imported fisheries products. The next most valuable imported items were canned fish and prawns, worth $158m and $148m respectively. The main countries of origin of imported fisheries products were Thailand (22% of total import value), New Zealand (14%) and the United States of America (7%).



17.13 SOURCE OF AUSTRALIAN IMPORTS OF FISHERIES PRODUCTS(a)

1997-98

1998-99

1999-2000

Country
$m
%
$m
%
$m
%

Thailand
218
26.6
237
26.9
241
22.0
New Zealand
128
15.6
143
16.3
156
14.3
United States of America
59
7.2
61
6.9
75
6.9
Japan
33
4.0
26
3.0
34
3.1
South Africa
26
3.2
33
3.8
34
3.1
Malaysia
28
3.4
25
2.8
32
2.9
Viet Nam
22
2.7
32
3.6
32
2.9
Indonesia
18
2.2
19
2.2
25
2.3
Canada
21
2.5
27
3.1
24
2.2
Chile
23
2.8
21
2.4
23
2.1
Taiwan
20
2.4
22
2.5
21
1.9
Peru
7
0.9
10
1.1
16
1.5
India
11
1.3
15
1.7
15
1.4
China
13
1.6
13
1.5
14
1.3
Hong Kong (SAR of China)
6
0.7
11
1.3
13
1.2
Singapore
16
2.0
11
1.3
12
1.1
Other
172
20.9
175
19.8
325
29.8
Total
820
100.0
880
100.0
1 092
100.0

(a) Includes non-edible products (e.g. marine fats and oils, fish meal, pearls and ornamental fish).

Source: ABS data available on request, International Trade data base.


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