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1387.3 - Queensland in Review, 2003  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 04/04/2005  Ceased
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Strong family life and involvement with the wider community are important for the functioning of any society. Indicators of these from the 2002 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey (NATSISS) include participation in social activities and voluntary work, availability of community support, and the presence of stressors.


SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS, Indigenous persons aged 15 years or over, Queensland, 2002



Remote areas
Non-remote areas
Total
Age 15-24 years
Age 25-44 years
Age 45 years and over
%
%
%
%
%
%

Involved in social activities in last 3 months
94.8
92.6
93.1
96.4
92.6
90.1
Participated in sport or physical recreation in last 12 months
64.8
47.9
52.2
70.2
50.0
34.3
Undertaken voluntary work in last 12 months
23.3
30.5
28.7
23.3
31.3
30.2
Able to get support in time of crisis from outside household
89.5
91.5
91.0
91.8
91.1
89.8
At least one stressor experienced in last 12 months
90.4
84.5
86.0
85.7
87.7
83.0
Person or relative removed from natural family
30.9
44.7
41.2
36.1
42.3
45.4
Indigenous persons aged 15 years or over (number)
19.2
56.9
76,000
22,300
35,400
18,400

Source: National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, Queensland, 2002, cat. no. 4714.3.55.001


Participation in social or community activities

In 2002, more than 9 out of 10 Indigenous people reported that they had been involved in social activities in the last three months. One half had participated in sport or physical recreation activities in the last 12 months and 29% had undertaken voluntary work in the last 12 months. Participation in both social activities and physical recreation declined with age while voluntary work was more common amongst those aged over 25 years.

Comparison of Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations (ages 18 years or over, Queensland, 2002)
  • The proportion of adults involved in social activities was similar in both populations.
  • Participation in sport or physical recreation activity was higher in the non-Indigenous population (63% compared to 47% of Indigenous people).
  • The proportion of adults involved in voluntary work was higher in the non-Indigenous population (36% compared to 29%).

Source: General Social Survey, 2002 and National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, 2002. (See table 4 in the data cube 4714.3.55.001 - charges apply).

Support in times of crisis

A large majority of Indigenous people (91%) reported that, in a time of crisis, they could get support from outside their household. There was little difference in this figure by sex, by age groups or whether they lived in remote or non-remote areas. Those living in households with higher income were more likely to report positively to this question. (If households are ranked according to equivalised gross household income, 95% of people in households in the 3rd to 5th quintiles felt they could get support, compared to 89% of those in the 1st and 2nd quintile households). (See tables 3 and 9 in the data cube 4714.3.55.001 - charges apply).


Comparison of Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations (ages 18 years or over, Queensland, 2002)
  • A slightly higher proportion of people in the non-Indigenous population reported they could get support in time of crisis (95%, compared to 91% of the Indigenous population).

Source: General Social Survey, 2002 and National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, 2002. (See table 4 in the data cube 4714.3.55.001 - charges apply).

Stressors experienced in the last 12 months

The majority (86%) of Indigenous people reported that they had experienced at least one stressor in the last 12 months. The most frequently reported stressors were the death of a family member or close friend (49%), serious illness or disability (34%) and inability to get a job (31%).

Those living in remote areas were slightly more likely than those living in non-remote areas to report experiencing a stressor (90% compared with 85%). The most frequently reported stressors of those living in remote areas were the death of a family member or close friend (63%), overcrowding at home (54%) and alcohol and drug-related problems (52%).
REPORTED STRESSORS IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS(a), Indigenous persons aged 15 years or over, Queensland, 2002
Graph: Reported stressors in the past 12 months
Comparison of Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations (ages 18 years or over, Queensland, 2002)
  • Indigenous adults were almost one-and-a-half times more likely than non-Indigenous adults to report experiencing at least one stressor (86% compared with 59%).

Source: General Social Survey, 2002 and National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, 2002. (See table 4 in the data cube 4714.3.55.001 - charges apply).

Removal from natural family

To measure the number of Indigenous people potentially impacted by the removal of children from their families, the 2002 NATSISS asked Indigenous people aged 15 years or over whether they or any of their relatives had been removed from their natural families. About 7% of Indigenous people reported that they themselves had been removed from their natural family. In addition, 40% reported that they had relatives who, as a child, had been removed from their natural family, while 45% reported they had no relatives removed.

Indigenous people living in non-remote areas were more likely to either have been removed or had relatives removed from their natural family (45% of people in non-remote areas compared to 31% of those in remote areas).


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