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1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2008  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 07/02/2008   
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Contents >> Education and training >> Participation in education

PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATION

In May 2006, 2.6 million people aged 15-64 years applied to enrol in a course of study. Of these, 92% gained a place and were enrolled in a course of study (table 12.22).

12.22 PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATION(a) - May 2006

Males
Females
Persons
'000
'000
'000

Studying
1 127.3
1 265.1
2 392.4
Gained placement but deferred study
65.1
69.7
134.8
Unable to gain placement
23.9
32.3
56.2

(a) Persons aged 15-64 years who applied to enrol in a course of study.
Source: ABS data available on request, Survey of Education and Work.


In the period 2001-06, the demand for enrolment in a course of study increased. For example, applications from people aged 20-24 years increased by 19% (graph 12.23). While the number of 20-24 year olds studying increased by 22% over the same period, the number of 25-64 year olds studying increased by 25%. There was little change however, in the proportion of all applicants who reported being unable to gain a place, remaining at less than 1%.

12.23 Demand for education, by age group
Graph: 12.23 Demand for education, by age group

Many young people continue in full-time education immediately after completing compulsory schooling, either in post-compulsory schooling or in other forms of education, such as VET. In May 2006, 69% of 15-19 year olds were in full-time education (including 52% still at school). Some young people return to full-time study following a period of absence after completing compulsory schooling. In the 20-24 years age cohort, excluding persons still at school, 25% were undertaking full-time tertiary study and 12% were undertaking part-time tertiary study (table 12.24).

Many people aged 25 years and over return to study, to upgrade their skills or to gain new skills, often while employed. Some 6% of all persons aged 25-64 years in May 2006, were studying part time at a tertiary institution, compared with 2% studying full time.

12.24 EDUCATION PARTICIPATION RATES(a) - May 2006

Age group (years)
15-19
20-24
25-64
%
%
%

Attending school
51.6
*0.2
-
Attending tertiary(b)
Full time
18.4
24.7
1.9
Part time
7.5
12.0
5.6
Total
25.9
36.7
7.5
Attending
77.5
36.9
7.6
Not attending
22.5
63.1
92.4

* estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to 50% and should be used with caution
- nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)
(a) Persons aged 15-64 years.
(b) Educational institutions other than schools.
Source: ABS data available on request, 2006 Survey of Education and Work.


Between 2001 and 2006 the enrolment of 20-24 year olds in tertiary study, increased by 12%. The number of full-time participants in this age group increased by 47,900 (16%) compared with an increase in part-time participation of 9,700 (6%). Over the same period, there has been a 1.5% growth in the number of 15-19 year old participants. While the number of 25-64 year old participants increased by 5% overall, full-time participation by this age group increased by 13%, whereas part-time participation decreased, by 3% (graph 12.25).

12.25 Participation in tertiary education, by age group
Graph: 12.25 Participation in tertiary education, by age group


Education and work

Graph 12.26 shows the labour force status of all students aged 15-64 years in May 2006. Labour force participation was lowest among those in Year 12 or below (42%) and greatest for those undertaking a Certificate III or IV (89%). Of the 1.4 million students who were employed in May 2006, some 40% were enrolled for a Bachelor degree or above.

12.26 Participation in education(a), by labour force status - May 2006
Graph: 12.26 Participation in education(a), by labour force status—May 2006


Among young people enrolled to study in May 2006, full-time employment was much higher among those aged 20-24 years than those aged 15-19 years (27% compared with 8%). In both age groups, students who undertook part-time study were more frequently employed full time than part time.


Full-time participation

The 'full-time participation rate' describes the proportion of the population who are fully engaged in education or work or a combination of both. This includes: full-time education; full-time work; or both part-time education and part-time work. The full-time participation rate can be useful to determine the proportion of young people not fully engaged in education and/or work, and who might be at risk of future marginal participation in the labour market.

In May 2006, 180,000 (13%) of young people aged 15-19 years and 301,100 (21%) of 20-24 year olds were not full-time participants. Some 46,300 (3.4%) of 15-19 year olds and 103,500 (7.2%) of 20-24 year olds were neither enrolled to study nor in the labour force (table 12.27).
12.27 YOUTH PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATION, By labour force status - May 2006

Enrolled in study(a)
Full time
Part time
Total
Not enrolled
Total
'000
'000
'000
'000
'000

15-19 YEARS

In the labour force
Employed
Full time
10.9
75.2
86.1
137.3
223.4
Part time
374.5
19.2
393.7
74.3
468.0
Total
385.3
94.4
479.7
211.6
691.3
Unemployed
67.8
5.5
73.3
50.4
123.7
Not in the labour force
506.0
3.5
509.6
46.3
555.9
Total
959.2
103.5
1 062.6
308.3
1 370.9

20-24 YEARS

In the labour force
Employed
Full time
14.3
128.8
143.1
616.7
759.9
Part time
188.4
27.1
215.5
120.9
336.4
Total
202.7
155.9
358.6
737.7
1 096.3
Unemployed
12.9
4.8
17.7
60.6
78.3
Not in the labour force
139.5
11.3
150.8
103.5
254.3
Total
355.0
172.0
527.0
901.8
1 428.8

(a) All persons participating in education, including those whose study will not lead to a qualification.
Source: ABS data available on request, Survey of Education and Work.





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