Australian Bureau of Statistics

Rate the ABS website
ABS Home > Statistics > By Release Date
1367.5 - Western Australian Statistical Indicators, Dec 2002  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 15/01/2003   
   Page tools: Print Print Page Print all pages in this productPrint All RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product

Feature Article - Western Australia: A Small Area Perspective

(This article was published in the December quarter 2002 issue of Western Australian Statistical Indicators (ABS catalogue number 1367.5))


INTRODUCTION

Western Australia occupies the western third of the Australian continent, comprising a land area of about 2,529,880 square kilometres. The administration of the urban and regional areas of this large and diverse state is divided amongst 142 local government authorities; nine development commissions; and a number of state and Commonwealth government departments and organisations. The demand for information relating to small geographic areas (such as Local Government Areas - LGAs) and broader regions (such as development commission regions) continues to increase. The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) is committed to identifying and disseminating social, economic and environmental data for small areas to assist governments and communities seeking to enhance local and regional well-being in an environmentally sustainable way. The results of this on-going data gathering from ABS and non-ABS information sources are compiled and available in the ABS' Western Australian Regional Profiles and through the Integrated Regional Data Base, details of which are available on the ABS website on the Products & Services page under Key Products).

This article presents selected social and economic data for LGAs from the 2002 Regional Profiles to provide a mosaic of social and economic life in urban and regional Western Australia. A significant proportion of the social data has been drawn from the 2001 Census of Population and Housing. The Census is the most comprehensive source of information about the characteristics of people in Australia and the dwellings in which they live. Census data is available for small geographic areas and small population groups.

Data from the 2001 Agricultural Census was not available in time for inclusion in this article. An article is proposed for the March 2003 issue of Western Australian Statistical Indicators analysing results from the 2001 Agricultural Census and the 2002 Land Management and Salinity Survey.

Much more information is available from the Regional Profiles. Appendix 1 provides a complete list of social, economic and environmental tables available in the profiles. Readers with a requirement for small area data are encouraged to contact the ABS using the contact details provided in the Additional Information section at the end of this article.


ABS GEOGRAPHIC CLASSIFICATION

The ABS uses the Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC) as its standard geography for disseminating statistical data. The ASGC is a hierarchical classification with a number of geographic levels to satisfy different statistical purposes. In this article, the basic unit is the Local Government Area (LGA). LGAs can be aggregated to the Statistical Subdivision (SSD); SSDs aggregated to the Statistical Division (SD); SDs aggregated to state; and states to the Australian level.

For more information on the standard geography used for disseminating statistical data, including maps showing the location of these statistical areas, please refer to Statistical Geography: Volume 1 - Australian Standard Geographic Classification (ASGC) (ABS Cat. no. 1216.0), on the this web site.


POPULATION CHANGE

Western Australia's estimated resident population was 1,906,114 at 30 June 2001, nearly three quarters (73.3%) of whom reside in the Perth Statistical Division. Over the 12 months to 30 June 2001, the state's population increased by 1.39% (26,200 persons) while the population of the Perth Statistical Division increased at a slightly higher rate of 1.44% (19,800 persons).

POPULATION CHANGE, Largest and fastest growing LGAs,1999-2000 to 2000-01

LGA
no.
%
LGA
no.
%
LARGEST GROWTH
FASTEST GROWTH
Wanneroo (C)
3,696
4.6
Perth (C)
656
9.0
Swan (C)
2,832
3.4
Broome (S)
800
6.4
Rockingham (C)
2,182
3.0
Capel (S)
414
6.2
Mandurah (C)
1,880
4.0
Halls Creek (S)
227
6.2
Cockburn (C)
1,850
2.7
Yalgoo (S)
17
5.4

Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles.

Three of the five LGAs with the largest population growth in 2000-01 (compared with 1999-2000) were located on the outer fringes of the Perth Statistical Division and associated with affordable and low density residential housing developments (see also the section on Residential Building Approvals).

The southern coastal Cities of Rockingham and Mandurah are popular retirement areas. A significant proportion of growth in these LGAs in 2000-01 comprised people aged 55 years or older - 32.5% in the City of Rockingham and 51.1% in the City of Mandurah.

The City of Perth had the fastest growing population in 2000-01, up 9.0% albeit from a relatively low base population. The LGA is characterised by higher density residential living and a heavy concentration of families identified as DINKs (double income, no kids). The next four fastest growing LGAs were located outside the Perth metropolitan area. The Shire of Broome, a popular Kimberley tourist destination, was the fastest growing regional LGA (up 6.4%), with the Shires of Capel, on the urban fringe of Bunbury, and Halls Creek in the Kimberley recording the next fastest growth (both up 6.2%).
POPULATION CHANGE, Largest and fastest declining LGAs,1999-2000 to 2000-01

LGA
no.
%
LGA
no.
%
LARGEST DECLINE
FASTEST DECLINE
Kalgoorlie-Boulder (C)
-373
-1.2
Leonora (S)
-227
-10.3
East Pilbara (S)
-311
-5.0
Dundas (S)
-128
-9.3
Ashburton (S)
-275
-4.4
Meekatharra (S)
-133
-8.4
Leonora (S)
-227
-10.3
Trayning (S)
-29
-6.9
Coolgardie (S)
-151
-3.4
Yilgarn (S)
-117
-6.1

Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles.

LGAs recording the largest and fastest population declines in 2000-01 were in mining areas. The City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder experienced the largest decline, down 373 people (-1.2%) while a decline of 227 people in the Shire of Leonora translated to the state's fastest rate of LGA population decline (-10.3%).


PEOPLE BORN OVERSEAS

At the 2001 Census, 31.3% of Western Australia's population (568,832 people) were born overseas compared with 27.4% (478,011 people) at the 1996 Census, an indication of the states' increasingly multicultural society. The most common birthplaces included the United Kingdom and Ireland, Southern Europe, South-East Asia and New Zealand.
PEOPLE BORN OVERSEAS, LGAs with the largest number and proportion, 2001

LGA
no.
%
LGA
no.
%
LARGEST NUMBER
LARGEST PROPORTION
Stirling (C)
62,277
36.3
Perth (C)
4,623
52.4
Joondalup (C)
56,022
37.3
Vincent (T)
10,415
40.4
Melville (C)
31,814
34.8
Victoria Park (T)
10,944
39.6
Wanneroo (C)
30,558
37.2
Canning (C)
29,031
39.2
Gosnells (C)
29,043
35.4
Bayswater (C)
21,513
39.0

Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles; Census of Population and Housing.

The largest number and proportion of overseas-born people resided in LGAs in the Perth Statistical Division. Just over one quarter (26.2%) of the state's overseas-born population were located in the northern metropolitan Cities of Joondalup, Wanneroo and Stirling. The United Kingdom and Ireland (collectively) were the dominant birthplaces in these LGAs, accounting for 49.5%, 38.9% and 23.6% respectively of their overseas-born populations.

The City of Perth was the only LGA in the state in which more than half (52.4%) of the population was overseas-born. People born in the United Kingdom and Ireland accounted for the largest proportion of the overseas-born population, albeit a relatively low 13.3%, an indication of the multicultural spread within the LGA.


REPORTED OFFENCES

Reported offences are selected criminal offences reported to, or becoming known to, the Western Australian police and resulting in the creation of a report. In 2001-02, there were 271,072 offences reported in Western Australia (142.2 offences per 1,000 persons), an increase of 1.6% compared with the 266,694 offences reported in 2000-01 (141.9 offences per 1,000 persons). The most common offences were theft (35.2% of total reported offences), burglary (22.6%) and property damage (13.5%).
REPORTED OFFENCES, LGAs with the largest number and highest rate(a), Perth Statistical Division, 2001-02

LGA


no.


% of WA
offences
LGA


rate(a)


LARGEST NUMBER
HIGHEST RATE
Stirling (C)
28,671
10.6
Perth (C)
1,853.1
Perth (C)
14,758
5.4
Fremantle (C)
345.6
Joondalup (C)
14,661
5.4
Victoria Park (T)
276.2
Canning (C)
13,261
4.9
Belmont (C)
250.8
Wanneroo (C)
1,878
4.4
South Perth (C)
198.3

(a) per 1,000 of estimated resident population at 30 June 2001.
Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles; Western Australian Police Service, Offence Information System.

The five Perth Statistical Division LGAs with the largest number of reported offences accounted for 30.7% of total offences reported in Western Australia in 2001-02.

A notable proportion of the total offences reported in the City of Perth were committed against the person (9.8%) - mostly assault and robbery. The equivalent proportion for the state was 7.5%. This LGA also had a high proportion of property theft (44.7%) compared with the state equivalent of 35.2%, but a relatively low proportion of burglaries (11.6% compared with 22.6% for the state). The proportion of offences related to the trafficking or possession of drugs was also notable in the City of Perth at 8.1% of that LGAs total reported offences (5.7% for the state equivalent).

Graffiti offences were particularly notable in the Cities of Wanneroo and Joondalup, accounting for 16.6% and 13.3% (respectively) of each City's total reported offences, the state equivalent being 5.2%.

To enable comparisons of reported offences data to be made across LGAs of differing population sizes, a generally adopted practice is to present the data as a rate. For the purposes of this analysis, the data has been presented per 1,000 of the population of each LGA. In 2001-02, the City of Perth (1,853.1 offences per 1,000 population) ranked highest followed by the City of Fremantle (345.6 offences per 1,000 population). Rates for these LGAs should be interpreted with caution as the Cities experience high numbers of people moving through their business, shopping and recreation areas who live outside the City boundaries. The Town of Victoria Park recorded the next highest rate (276.2 offences per 1,000 population) followed by the adjacent Cities of Belmont (250.8) and South Perth (198.3). The City of Stirling, with the largest number of reported offences, recorded a rate of 161.7 offences per 1,000 population.
REPORTED OFFENCES, LGAs with the largest number and highest rate(a), Balance of state, 2001-02

LGA


no.


% of WA
offences
LGA


rate(a)


LARGEST NUMBER
HIGHEST RATE
Kalgoorlie-Boulder (C)
7,145
2.6
Dundas (S)
529.3
Mandurah (C)
6,639
2.4
Meekatharra (S)
454.0
Bunbury (C)
4,683
1.7
Mount Magnet (S)
405.8
Geraldton (C)
4,278
1.6
Mullewa (S)
340.5
Albany (C)
3,211
1.2
Laverton (S).
303.4

(a) per 1,000 of estimated resident population at 30 June 2001.
Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles; Western Australian Police Service, Offence Information System.

Compared with the largest Perth LGAs, in terms of number of reported offences, the largest country LGAs had much higher proportions of their respective total offences in the property damage category (particularly in the Cities of Geraldton and Albany), generally higher proportions in the assault category (particularly the City of Geraldton) and drugs category (notably the City of Albany), and much lower proportions in the graffiti category.

In respect of offence rates, the Shire of Dundas recorded the highest offence rate of 529.3 reported offences per 1,000 population. Nearly seven in every ten (68.0%) of reported offences in this LGA were drug offences. Burglary and property damage offences were prominent in the Shire of Meekatharra (collectively accounting for 57.8% of the Shire's total reported offences) and Mullewa (61.2%). Assault offences in the Shire of Laverton accounted for 34.1% of that Shire's total reported offences.


HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Household income is affected by the number of income earners in the household aged 15 years and over as well as the amount of income earned by each individual. At the 2001 census, the median weekly household income for Western Australian households was $781. The median weekly income for households in the Perth Statistical Division was $806 compared with $710 for the balance of the state.
MEDIAN WEEKLY HOUSEHOLD INCOME, LGAs with the highest income, 2001

LGA

$
LGA
$
PERTH STATISTICAL DIVISION
BALANCE OF STATE
Peppermint Grove (S)
1,604
Ashburton (S)
1,523
Nedlands (C)
1,192
Roebourne (S)
1,318
Cottesloe (T)
1,140
Port Hedland (T)
1,248
Cambridge (T)
1,110
East Pilbara (S)
1,187
Joondalup (C)
1,022
Coolgardie (S)
1,126

Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles; Census of Population and Housing.

The Shire of Peppermint Grove in the Perth Statistical Division had Western Australia's highest median weekly household income ($1,604), more than double the state's median weekly household income. The top four Perth Statistical Division LGAs are characterised by high levels of people in managerial, administration and professional occupations. In the City of Joondalup, occupations are more evenly divided between professionals (with a significant proportion of qualifications related to Engineering and related technologies); intermediate clerical, sales and service workers; and tradespersons.

There were 12 Western Australian LGAs (including the City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder and the Shire of Leonora) with median weekly household incomes over $1,000, seven being country LGAs. Employment in these LGAs is concentrated in the resources industry, where employees receive, on average, high wages and salaries. The average annual remuneration per employee in the Resources industry over the five years to 1999-2000 was $64,900 - refer to The Resources Industry in Western Australia, available from this web site (Themes>Western Australia>Articles of interest on Western Australia).
MEDIAN WEEKLY HOUSEHOLD INCOME, LGAs with the lowest income, 2001

LGA
$
LGA
$
PERTH STATISTICAL DIVISION
BALANCE OF STATE
Belmont (C)
627
Wickepin (S)
454
Kwinana (T)
638
Menzies (S)
481
Victoria Park (T)
650
Pingelly (S)
487
Fremantle (C)
675
Wiluna (S)
491
Perth (C)
686
Trayning (S)
492

Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles; Census of Population and Housing.

Of Perth Statistical Division LGAs with the lowest median weekly household incomes, the City of Belmont ranked lowest at $627. The City is characterised by relatively high levels of one parent families, people aged 60 years and over, rented dwellings and unemployment, characteristics that were also found in the City of Fremantle and the Town of Victoria Park. The Town of Kwinana, ranked second lowest at $638, had relatively high levels of one parent families and unemployment as well as high levels of people without qualifications, while the City of Perth had a significant number of lone person households (27.2%).

Of the 112 country LGAs, 52 had median weekly household incomes below Perth's lowest ranked City of Belmont. The Shire of Wickepin, one of three eastern wheatbelt Shires (the others being Pingelly and Trayning) represented in the five lowest country LGAs, recorded the state's lowest median weekly household income of $454, 41.9% below the median income for Western Australia. Around four in five persons aged 15 years and over in these shires do not have qualifications, with more common occupations including labourers and related workers and tradespersons and related workers. The Shires of Menzies and Wiluna have significant proportions of indigenous people with more common occupations including intermediate production and transport workers; tradespersons; and labourers.


UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

The unemployment rate represents the number of unemployed persons as a proportion of the number of persons in the labour force (the total of employed and unemployed persons). A person is defined as unemployed only if they are actively looking for full-time or part-time employment and are available to start work. At the 2001 Census, 7.5% (67,478 persons) of Western Australia's labour force reported being unemployed.
UNEMPLOYMENT RATE, LGAs with the highest rate, 2001

LGA

no.

Un- employed rate
%
LGA

no.

Un-
employed rate
%
PERTH STATISTICAL DIVISION
BALANCE OF STATE
Kwinana (T)
1,069
12.4
Irwin (S)
169
13.5
Perth (C)
372
10.5
Geraldton (C)
1,125
13.3
Rockingham (C)
3,077
9.9
Cue (S)
24
12.7
Victoria Park (T)
1,303
9.9
Mandurah (C)
2,731
12.2
Fremantle (C)
1,184
9.7
Murray (S)
487
11.2

Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles; Census of Population and Housing

Of the five Perth Statistical Division LGAs with the highest unemployment rates, four (the exception was the City of Rockingham) also featured as LGAs with the lowest median weekly household incomes. The Town of Kwinana and the City of Rockingham were also notable for high proportions of their respective populations aged 15 years or over that do not have qualifications. All five also had significant youth (persons aged 15 to 24 years) unemployment rates ranging from 17.1% in the City of Rockingham to 21.5% in the Town of Kwinana.

Of the 13 Western Australian LGAs with unemployment rates of 10.0% or more, 11 were located in the balance of the state. The highest rates were the regional centres of the City of Geraldton and the City of Mandurah, with nearby LGAs - the Shire of Irwin to the south of Geraldton; and the Shire of Murray adjacent to Mandurah - also amongst the highest unemployment rates. These four LGAs had high proportions of people without qualifications and also had high youth unemployment rates ranging from 21.1% to 23.1%.


COMPUTER AND INTERNET USE

The use of computers at home and of the Internet at home and elsewhere has become widespread in Western Australia. A growing number of people have access to a computer at home and a large proportion of the state's Internet users live in locations with greater access to the Internet (e.g. from public libraries, Internet cafes, shops and educational institutions). At the 2001 Census, 793,558 Western Australians (43.3%) reported using a computer at home and 703,029 (38.4%) reported accessing the Internet at home and elsewhere.
COMPUTER USE AT HOME, LGAs with the largest proportion of users, 2001

LGA

no.

%
LGA

no.

%
PERTH STATISTICAL DIVISION
BALANCE OF STATE
Peppermint Grove (S)
981
64.2
Mount Marshall (S)
342
53.6
Nedlands (C)
12,350
58.7
Capel (S)
3,144
48.3
Cottesloe (T)
3,952
57.9
Kent (S)
301
48.0
Cambridge (T)
13,106
57.3
Broomehill (S)
214
47.5
Joondalup (C)
83,652
56.9
Nungarin (S)
123
46.6

Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles; Census of Population and Housing.

The Shire of Peppermint Grove recorded the state's highest proportion of people using a computer at home (64.2%). Data from the 2001 Census indicates that the five Perth Statistical Division LGAs with the largest proportion of home computer users had high percentages of high income households; and managers, administrators and professionals. These LGAs also had high percentages of people with university qualifications with the exception of the developing City of Joondalup which had notably high percentages of people with skilled vocational qualifications.

In country Western Australia, LGAs recording high proportions of computer use at home were located in the north-eastern wheatbelt (including the Shire of Mount Marshall, which had the highest use of all country LGAs, and the Shire of Nungarin) and the northern and eastern parts of the Great Southern (including the Shires of Kent and Broomehill). This would indicate the reliance of farming communities on information technology for business, education and communication.


USE OF THE INTERNET ANYWHERE
USE OF THE INTERNET ANYWHERE, LGAs with the largest proportion of users, 2001

LGA

no.

%
LGA

no.

%
PERTH STATISTICAL DIVISION
BALANCE OF STATE
Peppermint Grove (S)
965
63.2
Nungarin (S)
109
41.3
Cottesloe (T)
4,082
59.8
Mount Marshall (S)
244
38.2
Subiaco (C)
9,004
59.3
Kent (S)
238
38.0
Claremont (T)
4,946
57.8
Roebourne (S)
6,011
37.8
Nedlands (C)
11,777
56.0
Greenough (S)
4,508
37.8

Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles; Census of Population and Housing.

The high use of computers at home also translated into high Internet use for three of the top Perth Statistical Division LGAs (the Shire of Peppermint Grove, the state's highest user at 63.2%; the Town of Cottesloe; and the City of Nedlands) and three of the top country LGAs (the Shires of Nungarin, Mount Marshall and Kent). The Shire of Roebourne, with Internet use by 37.8% of its population, includes the massive North West Shelf oil and gas projects.


EDUCATION: SCHOOL STUDENT POPULATIONS

In 2001, there were 314,544 primary and secondary school students in Western Australian government and non-government schools, an increase of 5,868 students (1.9%) compared with 1996. Three in every five students in 2001 attended primary schools, while seven in every ten (70.3%) attended government schools (down from 73.4% in 1996). The majority (71.4%) of students in 2001 attended schools located in the Perth Statistical Division.

SCHOOL STUDENTS(a), Largest growing LGAs, 1996 to 2001

LGA

no.

%
LGA

no.

%
PERTH STATISTICAL DIVISION
BALANCE OF STATE
Rockingham (C)
2,747
25.2
Mandurah (C)
1,216
15.5
Wanneroo (C)/Joondalup (C)(b)
2,196
5.4
Busselton (S)
979
30.8
Swan (C)
1,624
11.7
Bunbury (C)
406
7.0
Melville (C)
811
5.0
Harvey (S)
350
10.1
Belmont (C)
621
18.7
Dardanup (S)
344
47.6

(a) Primary and secondary students enrolled in government and non-government schools. Excludes pre-schools.
(b) From 1 July 1998, the City of Wanneroo was split to form the City of Wanneroo and the City of Joondalup. The student increase shown is between the City of Wanneroo in 1996 and the combined Cities of Wanneroo and Joondalup in 2001.
Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles; Education Department of Western Australia.

In the Perth Statistical Division, the Cities of Rockingham, Wanneroo/Joondalup (combined) and Swan recorded the highest growth in student numbers over the five years to 2001. These LGAs have experienced strong resident population growth over this period. The City of Rockingham recorded the largest increase in school student population, the majority of the increase (57.3%) comprising primary school students. In this LGA in 2001, almost two in every three students (65.7%) attended primary schools compared with the state proportion of 60.3%. Similar growth in student numbers occurred in the combined Cities of Wanneroo and Joondalup and in the City of Swan, with higher proportions of students in these LGAs attending primary schools than the state proportion. Each of these
high student growth areas had relatively high proportions of the resident population aged 5-14 years, a group encompassing primary school students. Of students attending schools in the City of Melville, 48.0% attended primary schools, the lower proportion attributable to a relatively high number of secondary schools (and high secondary school population) located in this LGA.

In the balance of the state, regional centres south of Perth recorded the largest growth in school student numbers over the five years to 2001, driven by expanding resident populations. Urban spread associated with the City of Bunbury has resulted in expanding school student numbers in the adjacent Shires of Harvey and Dardanup. The proportion of primary school students in these high growth LGAs were mainly below the state proportion in 2001, except for Dardanup Shire which only catered for primary school students.


HOME OWNERSHIP

At the 2001 Census, an equal proportion (36.0%) of dwellings in the Perth Statistical Division and the Balance of Western Australia were owned outright. By contrast, just over one third (34.1%) of dwellings in the Perth Statistical Division were being purchased compared with one quarter of dwellings in the rest of the state. Renting is more prevalent outside Perth, most notably in the Kimberley and Pilbara regions.

DWELLINGS OWNED OUTRIGHT
DWELLINGS OWNED OUTRIGHT, LGAs with the highest proportion in 2001

LGA

no.

%
LGA

no.

%
PERTH STATISTICAL DIVISION
BALANCE OF STATE
Peppermint Grove (S)
299
57.6
Wickepin (S)
202
66.4
Nedlands (C)
3,640
49.7
Narrogin (S)
165
62.7
Melville (C)
16,803
48.1
Wandering (S)
76
61.3
Claremont (T)
1,725
47.4
Mount Marshall (S)
151
60.4
Cottesloe (T)
1,417
47.2
Perenjori (S)
135
60.3

Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles; Census of Population and Housing.

In the Perth Statistical Division, the highest proportion of dwellings owned outright were in older established LGAs. The Shire of Peppermint Grove had the highest proportion, approaching three in every five dwellings (57.6%) while half of the dwellings in the City of Nedlands were owner-occupied.

The highest proportions of owner-occupancy in the balance of the state were in wheatbelt shires, the Shire of Wickepin recording the highest in the state with two-thirds (66.4%) of dwellings owned outright. Another 40 of the 112 country LGAs recorded proportions of 50.0% or more.
DWELLINGS BEING PURCHASED, LGAs with the highest proportion in 2001

LGA

no.

%
LGA

no.

%
PERTH STATISTICAL DIVISION
BALANCE OF STATE
Wanneroo (C)
13,338
48.7
Collie (S)
1,278
43.4
Kwinana (T)
3,461
46.3
Meekatharra (S)
1,651
41.2
Swan (C)
13,147
46.2
Capel (S)
897
39.7
Gosnells (C)
13,001
45.4
Dardanup (S)
2,169
36.0
Joondalup (C)
22,788
44.8
Boddington (S)
181
35.0

Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles; Census of Population and Housing.

Of the ten LGAs with the highest proportion of dwellings being purchased, eight were located in the Perth Statistical Division. LGAs in Perth's urban fringe, where substantial residential development has occurred in recent years, recorded the highest proportions. In the City of Wanneroo, every second home (48.7% of dwellings) was being purchased.

Country LGAs with the highest proportion of dwellings being purchased were mainly located in the state's south-west. The Shire of Collie had the highest proportion (43.4%) while the Shires of Capel and Dardanup (39.7% and 36.0% respectively) are being impacted by residential development associated with the City of Bunbury's urban spread.


RESIDENTIAL BUILDING APPROVALS

Residential dwelling approvals over the three financial years to 2001-02 have been significantly affected by The New Tax System, in particular the Goods and Services Tax (GST), and by the First Home Owners Grant (FHOG) both effective from July 2000. Dwelling approvals in 2000-01 were subdued partly due to new home buyers bringing forward their building plans to avoid increased construction costs associated with the introduction of the GST in July 2000. Other contributing factors were rises in both official interest rates in the first half of 2000-01 and in the cost of new homes. The doubling of the initial $7,000 FHOG to $14,000 in March 2001 (reverting to $10,000 on 1 January 2002) together with falling interest rates provided a significant stimulus to dwelling approvals which rebounded strongly in 2001-02.

In 2001-02, there were 20,025 new dwellings approved (worth $2,592.6 million), an increase of 37.2% (or 5,426 dwellings) compared with 2000-01. Nearly three in four (73.4%) residential dwellings approved in 2001-02 were located in the Perth Statistical Division.
DWELLING UNITS APPROVED, Top 10 LGAs

Ranking
2001-02


Local government
area


1999-2000

no.
2000-01

no.
2001-02

no.
Ranking
2001-02


Local government
area


1999-2000

no.
2000-01

no.
2001-02

no.
PERTH STATISTICAL DIVISION
BALANCE OF STATE
1Wanneroo (C)
1,848
1,533
2,330
1Mandurah (C)
1,041
655
1,233
2Stirling (C)
2,015
1,114
1,708
2 Busselton (S)
630
415
416
3Rockingham (C)
1,057
747
1,333
3 Albany (C)
401
254
314
4Swan (C)
1,447
881
1,279
4 Capel (S)
149
200
305
5Gosnells (C)
1,146
657
1,140
5 Augusta-Margaret River (S)
271
125
263
6Joondalup (C)
1,286
868
911
6Bunbury (C)
388
173
220
7Canning (C)
818
549
797
7 Harvey (S)
288
110
197
8Cockburn (C)
1,199
840
781
8 Murray (S)
168
116
189
9Melville (C)
829
435
476
9 Broome (S)
240
138
160
10Bayswater (C)
477
317
383
10 Dardanup (S)
198
93
135

Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles.

LGAs prominent in dwelling approval activity in Perth Statistical Division in 2001-02 were:
  • the City of Wanneroo, with 2,330 dwellings approved, continues to be Perth's dominant residential growth area where demand for affordable housing on Perth's urban fringe is matched by plentiful vacant land stock;
  • the City of Stirling, which ranked second with 1,708 new dwellings approved. Urban infill has been a significant contributor to new dwelling development ensuring continued development in an area approximately one-sixth the size of the City of Wanneroo. For further information on Perth's urban infill, refer to A View of Housing Density in Perth, available from this web site (Themes>Western Australia>Articles of interest on Western Australia); and
  • the Cities of Rockingham and Joondalup, which ranked third and sixth respectively. These LGAs were two of four 'nodes' proposed in the Perth Corridor plan of the 1980s which aimed to attract business away from the Perth CBD but also attracted residential development.

Of the top 10 LGAs in 2001-02 located outside the Perth Statistical Division:
  • the City of Mandurah ranked highest with 1,233 new dwellings approved. This level is just below that recorded by the fourth ranked Perth LGA, the City of Swan (1,279 dwellings) and reflects the change in character of Mandurah City from a holiday centre to an urban centre; and
  • the City of Bunbury ranked sixth with 220 new dwellings approved. With land availability in the City diminishing, residential development has flowed into the surrounding Shires of Capel (ranked fourth - 305 dwellings approved), Harvey (ranked seventh - 199 dwellings approved) and Dardanup (ranked tenth - 135 dwellings approved).


MINERAL AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTION

The Resources industry dominates the Western Australian economy - refer to The Resources Industry in Western Australia, available from this web site (Themes>Western Australia>Articles of interest on Western Australia). In 2001, the state's mineral and petroleum production was valued at $27,190.9 million, up 5.8% compared with 2000 ($25,704.3 million). The increase in 2001 was, in part, due to the devaluation of the Australian dollar against the US dollar, which particularly supported the value of iron ore, alumina and gold production.

Contractual arrangements made earlier in 2001 that achieved higher commodity prices, particularly for LNG and iron ore, also contributed to the increase as did the expansion of some mining operations and an alumina refinery expansion. Seven commodities dominated production in 2001, with iron ore contributing $5,245.9 million; crude oil $4,246.6 million; alumina $3,766.5 million; gold $3,227.6 million; liquefied natural gas (LNG) $2,901.3 million; nickel $2,081.3 million; and condensate $1,787.9 million.
VALUE OF MINERAL AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTION, Top 10 LGAs

Ranking
2001

Local government area


1999
$m
2000
$m
2001
$m
1Roebourne (S)
4,106.0
8,369.3
8,855.5
2Ashburton (S)
2,510.6
3,854.8
3,632.9
3East Pilbara (S)
1,936.0
2,367.9
2,902.4
4Murray (S)
758.5
1,760.2
1,890.5
5Kalgoorlie-Boulder (C)
870.3
1,310.1
1,514.2
6Boddington (S)
574.6
820.2
1,188.4
7Leonora (S)
878.7
1,188.2
1,159.3
8Wiluna (S)
590.0
983.1
986.5
9Waroona (S)
485.7
717.1
807.2
10Coolgardie (S)
495.5
699.9
656.6
Western Australia
16,914.0
25,704.3
27,190.9

Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles; WA Department of Mineral and Petroleum Resources, Mineral and Petroleum Statistics Digest.

Extraction of the major mineral and petroleum commodities are centred on three areas of the state: the Pilbara (petroleum products and iron ore); Goldfields (gold and nickel) and southern Darling Scarp (alumina).
  • The Shire of Roebourne, ranked highest of the mineral and petroleum producing LGAs, is the centre for the huge offshore oil and gas fields of the North West Shelf and the onshore North West Shelf LNG plant. In 2001, the Shire recorded $8,855.5 million of minerals and petroleum production of which $8,674.6 million (or 98.0%) was petroleum products, mainly crude oil ($3,159.5 million), LNG ($2,901.3 million) and condensate ($1,672.9 million). The Shire accounted for 86.9% of state petroleum production.
  • Iron ore production dominated the second and third ranked LGAs in 2001, representing 64.5% (or $2,343.8 million) of total mineral and petroleum production in the Shire of Ashburton and 95.0% ($2,757.8 million) in the Shire of East Pilbara. The decline in production in Ashburton Shire in 2001 resulted from lower output of the Shire's second largest commodity, crude oil, which was down in both quantity (by 1.3 million kilolitres) and value ($442.6 million), weaker oil prices contributing to the decline in value.
  • Production from the fourth ranked LGA, the Shire of Murray, comprised only Alumina. Alumina also dominated the sixth ranked LGA, the Shire of Boddington (89.9% of production, the balance being gold), with increased production in 2001 due partly to an expanded refinery capacity; and the ninth ranked Shire of Waroona (100.0%).
  • Gold was the predominant commodity in the fifth ranked City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder (51.9% of production) and the Shires of Leonora (62.2%) and Coolgardie (56.1%). The other significant mineral mined in these LGAs was nickel. Nickel metal and nickel concentrates comprised 43.0% of Kalgoorlie-Boulder production while nickel concentrates comprised 37.8% and 29.7% (respectively) of Leonora and Coolgardie Shire outputs and dominated mining in the eighth ranked Shire of Wiluna (71.2% of total shire production with gold, 27.8%, the next highest mineral produced). Although the quantity of nickel concentrates produced in the three shires was up in 2001, the value of production fell as a result of a significant fall in international nickel prices which was not sufficiently compensated for by the devaluation of the Australian dollar.


COMMERCIAL FISHERIES

The marine environment, and the living natural resources it supports, is one of Western Australia's most valuable sustainable assets. In 2000-01, the estimated commercial fishing catch from the state's ocean and estuarine resources was valued at $415.8 million, down by 21.4% compared with 1999-2000 ($528.7 million). This follows increases of 36.9% in 1999-2000 and 19.1% in 1998-99. Factors determining the estimated value of the state's commercial fishing catch include international demand for species; natural environmental variations; and management controls to ensure that fisheries remain sustainable.
ESTIMATED VALUE OF FISHING CATCH(a)(b), Top 10 LGAs

Ranking
2000-01


Local government area



1998-99

$m
1999-2000

$m
2000-01

$m
1Geraldton (C)
65.1
84.8
73.0
2Gingin (S)
39.5
60.9
42.5
3Irwin (S)
35.9
51.6
40.0
4Dandaragan (S)
34.2
55.2
39.3
5Carnarvon (S)
42.1
51.4
39.0
6Fremantle (C)
24.5
37.1
27.9
7Wanneroo (C)
24.4
36.4
24.8
8Northampton (S)
18.1
22.5
22.6
9Mandurah (C)
9.8
19.7
18.3
10Coorow (S)
15.0
20.6
17.3
Western Australia
386.1
528.7
415.8

(a) Excludes Commonwealth managed fisheries.
(b) Data relate to the port of landing of the catch.
Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles; WA Department of Fisheries.

The value of Western Australia's commercial fisheries catch is dominated by the rock lobster fishery (mainly western rock lobster but also including southern and tropical lobsters). This fishery represented 72.1% of the value of the state's fishing catch in 2000-01 and around 62.4% of Australia's rock lobster fishery. Nine of the ten LGAs with the highest estimated value of fishing catch are dominated by the western rock lobster fishery, the general decline in catch value in 2000-01 resulting from natural environment variations.

LGA catch data from year-to-year may vary as fishermen move from one landing port to another. Of the top ten LGAs with the highest estimated fishing catch by value in 2000-01:
  • the City of Geraldton ranked highest with $73.0 million. Western rock lobster accounted for 85.2% of the value, the live weight over the last four years averaging 2,690 tonnes. Saucer scallop contributed another 8.5% of the total catch value;
  • the mid-west coast shires of Gingin (ranked second), Irwin (third), Dandaragan (fourth) and the City of Wanneroo (seventh) were almost totally western rock lobster, which accounted for over 98.0% of the total fishing catch value in each LGA; and
  • the Shire of Carnarvon, ranked fifth, was the only LGA dominated by other species - prawns (76.4% of total catch value) and scallop (12.2%). Prawning is the state's third most valuable export fishery after western rock lobster and pearling. The decline of 24.1% in Shire catch value in 2000-01 was mainly due to a decrease in the prawn catch which can vary due to environmental factors such as water temperatures and cyclones as well as lower prices due to market forces.


FORESTRY PRODUCTION

In February 2001, the Western Australian government ended logging in all old-growth forests vested with the Conservation Commission of Western Australia. It also began a process of creating two new conservation parks and 30 new national parks, including 12 new national parks promised under the Western Australian Regional Forest Agreement. A number of changes to forestry guidelines were also made to further ensure forest management consistent with the principles of ecological sustainability, all of which has had a significant impact on state forestry production.

Log production of 1,479,490 cubic metres was recorded in Western Australia in 2000-01, down 16.2% from the 1,766,184 cubic metres harvested in 1999-2000. In the four years to 2000-01, the state's log production has fallen, in volume terms, at an annual average rate of 7.4%.
FORESTRY PRODUCTION, Top 10 LGAs

Ranking
2000-01


Local government area



1998-99

m3
1999-2000

m3
2000-01

m3
1Manjimup (S)
691,821
626,608
358,953
2Donnybrook-Balingup (S)
257,204
154,665
226,238
3Nannup (S)
202,274
282,723
183,879
4Murray (S)
39,920
46,015
92,790
5Augusta-Margaret River (S)
100,242
40,271
85,889
6Harvey (S)
68,862
139,020
68,105
7Collie (S)
59,713
86,064
64,727
8Boddington (S)
54,226
71,433
63,937
9Wanneroo (C)
75,500
87,810
63,903
10Bridgetown-Greenbushes (S)
3,619
8,473
49,190
Western Australia
1,813,210
1,766,184
1,479,490

Source: ABS 2002 Regional Profiles; Department of Conservation and Land Management.

Most of Western Australia's native hardwood forests grow in the south-west of the state, with log production centred on the shires of Manjimup, Donnybrook-Balingup and Nannup. The total contribution of these three shires to state log production has declined from 63.5% in 1998-99 to 52.0% in 2000-01. The first ranked Shire of Manjimup recorded the largest decline in production quantity over this period, down 332,868 cubic metres (48.1%).

Four shires increased their log production in 2000-01 - Donnybrook-Balingup, Murray, Augusta-Margaret River and Bridgetown-Greenbushes - by a combined total of 204,683 cubic metres. Part of log production in the Murray Shire, and in the sixth ranked Shire of Harvey, is attributable to clear felling associated with mining operations. Production in the one Perth metropolitan LGA, the City of Wanneroo, has been sustained by extensive harvesting of pine plantation timber.


ABS REGIONAL PROFILES

Western Australian Regional Profiles provide access to social, economic and environmental data for Local Government Areas, Statistical Sub-Divisions, Statistical Divisions and Development Commission Regions. They are available in hardcopy and electronic format.

The profiles use data from the ABS and other Commonwealth, state and local government agencies. Data are provided as tables, graphs and time series data and presented as:
  • social indicators, including population and households data from the 2001 Census of Population and Housing, employment, education and training, computer and Internet use, crime and health; and
  • economic and environmental indicators, including agriculture, fisheries, forestry, mining, building and construction, business and finance, transport and tourism.

Profiles also enable comparison of a specified area (LGA, SSD, SD or DCR) with a number of other LGAs, SSDs, SDs or DCRs.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

For more information about the 2002 Regional Profiles, either visit More About the RSUs (Themes>Regional Statistics>More About the RSUs) or contact Daniel Christensen on (08) 9360 5932 or by email: daniel.christensen@abs.gov.au.


APPENDIX 1, STATISTICAL INDICATORS IN THE REGIONAL PROFILES

SOCIAL INDICATORS

Population and households
Estimated resident population
Estimated resident population, by age and sex
Demographics
Estimated and projected population
Population characteristics
Households and family types
Nature of housing occupancy
Weekly household income
Social security recipients
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
Religion
Language spoken at home
Country of birth

Employment
Labour force composition
Unemployment rates
Employed persons, by occupation
Employed persons, by industry
Employed persons, by industry sector
Labour market

Education and health
Government schools
Non-government schools
Teaching staff
Post school qualifications
Attendance at educational institutions
Hospital separations

Computer and Internet use
Computer use at home
Internet use
Crime and justice Fines and infringements
Offences reported to the Western Australian Police Service


ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS

Agriculture, fisheries and forestry
Agricultural production
Value of agricultural production
Land management
Fisheries production
Forestry production
Vegetation
Mining
Value of minerals and petroleum

Building and construction
Residential building approvals
Building activity
Non-residential building activity
Length of roads

Finance
Local Government Authority finances
Income and taxation status

Transport
New motor vehicle registrations, by vehicle type
Motor vehicles on register, by vehicle type
Passenger vehicles on register, by make of vehicle
Type of vehicle, by year of manufacture
Method of travel to work
Motor vehicles on register, by fuel type

Tourism
Tourist accommodation establishments
Tourism developments




Download this entire document
in Acrobat format

If you do not have reader software...
Western Australia - A Small Area Perspective_1.pdf
(167kb)


Bookmark and Share. Opens in a new window

Commonwealth of Australia 2014

Unless otherwise noted, content on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia Licence together with any terms, conditions and exclusions as set out in the website Copyright notice. For permission to do anything beyond the scope of this licence and copyright terms contact us.