Australian Bureau of Statistics

Rate the ABS website
ABS Home > Statistics > By Release Date
ABS @ Facebook ABS @ Twitter ABS RSS ABS Email notification service
1345.4 - SA Stats, Feb 2006  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 22/02/2006   
   Page tools: Print Print Page Print all pages in this productPrint All RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product

ABOUT THIS PUBLICATION

This publication provides an overview of the South Australian economy. The overview will be updated on a quarterly basis (in September, December, March and June) and in the intervening months the publication will include feature articles that provide a South Australian focus on economic, social and environmental issues.

Explanatory Notes are not included in SA Stats in the form found in other ABS publications. Readers are directed to the Explanatory Notes contained in related ABS publications referenced in the feature article.

This months article presents results from the Labour Force and Other Characteristics of Migrants survey (ABS Cat. no. 6250.0), conducted in November 2004.

If you have any comments about this product please contact Lisa Moutzouris on ph: (08) 8237 7455 or alternatively e-mail lisa.moutzouris@abs.gov.au.



LABOUR FORCE AND OTHER CHARACTERISTICS OF MIGRANTS IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA

This article presents data from the Labour Force Status and Other Characteristics of Migrants survey, which was conducted as a supplement to the monthly Labour Force Survey in November 2004. For this survey, data were collected for people who were born overseas, arrived in Australia after 1984, were aged 15 years or over on arrival, and had obtained permanent resident status prior to, or after, their arrival. This article presents information on migrants for South Australia and comparisons are made with the other states and territories and with Australia. Further information can be obtained from the publication 'Labour Force Statistics and Other Characteristics of Migrants, Australia, November 2004' (Cat. no. 6250.0).

In November 2004, most South Australian migrants were grouped in the prime employment ages between 25 and 54 years and over a quarter of them held a Bachelor degree or higher qualification when they arrived in Australia. They were more likely to be employed than the South Australian population. Paradoxically, they also were more likely to be unemployed than the South Australian population. What looks like a contradiction is in part explained by the higher proportion of the South Australian population not employed and not actively looking for work and therefore being classified as being 'not in the labour force'. When employed, close to one in three South Australian migrants were employed in the Professional occupation grouping.

In November 2004 there were 49,900 migrants living in South Australia, representing 4% of the total South Australian population aged 15 years and over. The 49,900 South Australian migrants also represented 4% of the total Australian migrant population.

Overall, there were 1,362,600 migrants living in Australia, representing 9% of the Australian population aged 15 years and over.

New South Wales and Western Australia had the highest proportion of migrants with 11% of their total population aged 15 years and over. Tasmania had the lowest proportion of migrants, 3% of its total population aged 15 years and over.


Age and sex

In November 2004, the majority (82%) of South Australian migrants were aged between 25 and 54 years. This was significantly higher than the proportion recorded for the total South Australian population aged 15 years and over, of 52%.

At the national level, the picture was similar to that for South Australia. In November 2004, migrants aged between 25 and 54 years comprised 80% of the Australian migrant population aged 15 years and over, and this was significantly higher than those aged between 25 and 54 years as a proportion of the total Australian population aged 15 years and over (54%).

The pattern of the majority of migrants being in the prime employment age range, and their proportion in employment being significantly higher than the total population is evident in every state and territory. The proportions of migrants whose ages were between 25 and 54 years ranged from 85% in the Northern Territory to 73% in Tasmania.

Females accounted for 52% of the South Australian migrant population and males 48%. Nationally, the migrant population comprised 54% females and 46% males.

Labour force characteristics

In November 2004, the labour force participation rate for migrants in South Australia was 75%. This was higher than the participation rate for South Australia (62%). The proportion of migrants who were unemployed (6%) was slightly higher than the population in South Australia who were unemployed (5%). The proportion of migrants in South Australia who were not in the labour force (25%) was lower than the proportion of the total South Australian population who were not in the labour force (38%).

In November 2004, the labour force participation rate of male migrants in South Australia was 86% and 64% of females, compared to 70% of males and 54% of females in the total South Australian population.

The labour force participation rate for migrants in Australia (70%) was lower than the South Australian proportion. The proportion of migrants in Australia who were unemployed (6%) was the same as South Australia and the proportion of migrants in Australia who were not in the labour force (30%), was higher than that for South Australia.

The Australian Capital Territory had the highest labour force participation rate for migrants (79%), while the lowest labour force participation rate was in Tasmania (68%). New South Wales, the Australian Capital Territory and the Northern Territory all had unemployment rates of 5%, the remaining states had unemployment rates of 6% except for Tasmania which had the highest unemployment rate at 10%. Tasmania also had the highest proportion not in the labour force (32%), while the Australian Capital Territory (21%) had the lowest.


Occupation

In November 2004, 30% of the employed migrant population in South Australia were employed as Professionals. The occupation groups with the next largest proportions of employed migrants were Labourers and associated workers (15%), Intermediate clerical, sales and service workers (13%), and Tradespersons and related workers (10%).

Professionals were also proportionally the largest occupation group for migrants in Australia, with 24% of migrants employed in this occupation group. This was followed by: Intermediate clerical, sales and service workers (15%); Associate professionals; Tradespersons and related workers; and Labourers and related workers, all with 11%.

For all states and territories except the Northern Territory, Professionals had the highest proportion of migrants. In the Northern Territory, Associate professionals (19%) had the highest proportion of migrants. For all states and territories, the occupation group with the lowest proportion of migrants was Advanced clerical and service workers.

Non-school qualifications obtained before arrival in Australia

The proportion of South Australian migrants who arrived in Australia with non-school qualifications was 44%. Of the South Australian migrants who arrived with non-school qualifications, 60% arrived with a Bachelor degree or higher.

The proportion of Australian migrants who arrived in Australia with non-school qualifications (49%) was higher than the South Australian proportion. As for South Australia, the majority of the Australian migrant population who arrived in Australia with non-school qualifications had a Bachelor degree or higher (57%).

The Australian Capital Territory had the highest proportion of migrants who arrived with non-school qualifications (64%) while the Northern Territory had the lowest proportion of migrants who arrived with non-school qualifications (41%).

References:
Source: Labour Force Status and Other Characteristics of Migrants, Australia, November 2004 (Cat. no. 6250.0)


Bookmark and Share. Opens in a new window

Commonwealth of Australia 2014

Unless otherwise noted, content on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia Licence together with any terms, conditions and exclusions as set out in the website Copyright notice. For permission to do anything beyond the scope of this licence and copyright terms contact us.