Australian Bureau of Statistics

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6216.0 - Multiple Jobholding, Australia, Aug 1997  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 20/03/1998   
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SUMMARY OF FINDINGS

OVERVIEW

In August 1997, there were 435,600 multiple jobholders aged 15 years and over. The proportion of employed persons holding multiple jobs increased from 3.7% in August 1987 to 5.2% in August 1997.

In August 1987, there were more males than females holding multiple jobs (146,200 compared to 116,500). Since July 1991, this situation has been reversed with more females than males holding multiple jobs. In August 1997, there were 226,400 female compared to 209,200 male multiple jobholders.

This change represented an increase in the proportion of employed females holding multiple jobs from 4.1% in August 1987 to 6.3% in August 1997, and for employed males, from 3.4% to 4.4% over the same period.


EMPLOYED PERSONS HOLDING MULTIPLE JOBS
INDUSTRY OF MAIN JOB AND SECOND JOB

Persons working in Education, and Cultural and recreational services in their main job were most likely to hold more than one job. Some 9% of those employed in Education, and Cultural and recreational services industries held more than one job.


EMPLOYED PERSONS HOLDING MULTIPLE JOBS BY INDUSTRY (MAIN JOB)
The second jobs held by multiple jobholders tended to be in Retail trade (14% of multiple jobholders held their second job in the Retail trade industry), Property and business services (11%), and Education (11%) and Health and community services industries (11%).

Almost three-quarters (74%) of multiple jobholders worked in different industries in their main and second jobs. Industries most likely to employ multiple jobholders in both their main and second job were Health and community services, and Education. Multiple jobholders working in Cultural and recreational services in their second job, were most likely to work in a different industry in their main job.


MULTIPLE JOBHOLDERS: PROPORTION WHO CHANGED INDUSTRY IN THEIR SECOND JOB BY INDUSTRY OF SECOND JOB
Males holding multiple jobs tended to work in Manufacturing (13%), and Property and business services (13%) in their main job. In comparison, the industry in which the greatest proportion of female multiple jobholders worked in their main job was Health and community services (18%).

In their second job, male multiple jobholders tended to work in Agriculture, forestry and fishing, and Property and business services (both 14%), while females tended to work in Health and community services (17%) and Retail trade (16%).

OCCUPATION OF MAIN AND SECOND JOB

Persons who were employed in their main job as Professionals (7% of employed persons in that occupation), Advanced clerical and service workers, Intermediate clerical sales and service workers, and Elementary clerical, sales and service workers, (all 6%) were most likely to hold multiple jobs. Occupation groups with the lowest proportions of persons holding multiple jobs were Tradespersons and related workers, and Intermediate production and transport workers (both 3%).


EMPLOYED PERSONS HOLDING MULTIPLE JOBS
BY OCCUPATION (MAIN JOB)
Multiple jobholders were most likely to be employed as Professionals (22% of all multiple jobholders) and Intermediate clerical, sales and service workers (17%) in their second job. Occupations with the lowest proportions of multiple jobholders in their second job were Advanced clerical and service workers (4%) and Tradespersons and related workers (5%).

Some 107,000 multiple jobholders (25% of all multiple jobholders) were employed as a Professional in their main job. Of these, 60% were employed as Professionals in their second job as well.

WEEKLY EARNINGS IN MAIN AND SECOND JOB

The distribution of earnings of multiple jobholders who were employees in both jobs shows higher proportions of females than males in the lowest weekly earnings ranges, in both their main job and second job. In their main job, 73% of females earned less than $480 a week, compared to 43% of males. In their second job, 62% of females earned less than $160 a week, compared to 50% of males. These earnings results are affected by the relative hours worked in each job by both males and females (see next section).

HOURS WORKED IN MAIN AND SECOND JOB

Just over half (54%) of those working full-time in their main job worked up to 10 hours a week in their second job. Another 23% worked between 10 and 14 hours and 24% worked 15 hours or more in their second job.

Some 69% of those working less than 20 hours a week in their main job, worked up to 10 hours in their second job, 12% worked between 10 and 14 hours, and a further 19% worked 15 hours or more in their second job. For persons working 20 to 34 hours in their main job, the proportions were: 50%, 17% and 33%.

Male multiple jobholders were more likely to work longer hours than females in both their main and second job. In their main job, 59% of males worked 35 hours or more a week, compared to 28% of females, while in their second job 52% of males worked ten or more hours a week compared to 34% of females.


MULTIPLE JOBHOLDERS: HOURS WORKED IN MAIN AND SECOND JOBS

Some 58% of multiple jobholders worked up to 10 hours a week in their second job. Those working in the Cultural and recreational services (72%) and Education industries (70%) recorded the highest proportions. Industries where multiple jobholders tended to work the most hours in their second job were Agriculture, forestry and fishing, and Manufacturing where 61% and 54% of multiple jobholders worked 10 hours or more in their second job.

AGE

Employed persons aged 55 and over were least likely to hold multiple jobs. Some 4% of employed persons in this age group held more than one job. In all other age groups, the proportion of employed persons holding multiple jobs varied between 5% and 6%.

For employed males, those in the 20-24 years age group were most likely to hold multiple jobs. Some 5% of males in this age group held more than one job. For employed females the highest proportion was in the 15-19 years age group (8%).

RELATIONSHIP IN HOUSEHOLD

The proportion of employed persons holding a multiple job was similar for persons who were a member of a family and for those who were not; all sub-categories ranging between 4% and 6%. Dependent students were the group most likely to hold multiple jobs: some 9% of female and 5% of male dependent students held more than one job.


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