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3235.2 - Population by Age and Sex, Victoria, Jun 2000  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 29/06/2001  Ceased
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Final Issue - This publication is being replaced by Population by Age and Sex, Australia (Cat. No. 3235.2.55.001) Companion Data.

Population at 30 June 2000

The estimated resident population (ERP) for Victoria at 30 June 2000 was 4,765,900, an increase of 58,300 (1.2%) since 1999 and 248,500 (5.5%) in the five years since 1995, at an average annual growth rate of 1.1%.

The ERP of the Melbourne Statistical Division (MSD) was 3,466,000 accounting for 72.7% of the State's population. The population of the Melbourne Statistical Division has increased by 52,100 (1.5%) since 1999 and 222,300 (6.9%) since 1995, at an average annual growth rate of 1.3%.

The rest of Victoria experienced growth in the statistical divisions of Barwon (3,700 or 1.5%), Goulburn (1,600 or 0.9%) Central Highlands (1,000 or 0.7%), Loddon (770 or 0.5%), Ovens-Murray (490 or 0.5%), Mallee (250 or 0.3%) and Gippsland (290 or 0.2%). Wimmera, East Gippsland and Western District experienced declines of 1.2% (620 persons), 1.0% (800 persons) and 0.6% (610 persons) respectively.

GROWTH RATE, Statistical Divisions- Victoria
graph - GROWTH RATE,  Statistical Divisions--- Victoria
(a) Average annual growth rate


Victoria compared to Australia

In June 2000, the Victorian population made up 24.9% of the Australian population. This proportion is consistent with that of 1995 and 1999, when Victoria made up 25.0% and 24.9% of the Australian population respectively.

Age Structure

The age distribution of the Victorian population is concentrated around the age range of 20-44 years. During the year to 30 June 2000, the largest increase was in the 50-54 years age group which increased by 10,400 (3.5%). The highest growth rate was in the 85 years-and-over age group at 5.7% followed by the 80-84 years age group at 5.0%.

Within the 0-14 years age group, there were 4,800 less individuals aged 0-4 years (a decrease of 1.6% since 1999) and 3,867 more individuals aged 5-14 years (an increase of 0.6% since 1999). As a proportion of the Victoria population, the 0-14 years age group has decreased from 20.9% in 1995 and 20.1% in 1999 to 19.9% in 2000.

The number of people aged 65 and over in Victoria in June 2000 increased by 10,100 (1.7%). As a proportion of the Victorian population, this age group continues to increase from 12.3% in 1995 and 12.7% in 1999 to 12.8% in 2000.

The median age of Victorians has continued to rise from 34.0 years in 1995 and 35.1 years in 1999 to 35.3 years in 2000. This is slightly higher than the June 2000 preliminary median Australian age of 35.2 years.

PERCENTAGE (a) OF POPULATION IN AGE GROUPS, Victoria

(a) Percent of MSD population by age and sex, and percent of Rest of Victoria population by age and sex.


Age Distribution by Statistical Division

The Statistical Division with the highest proportion of persons in this age group was Mallee (22.7%) and the lowest proportion was in the MSD (19.1%). The MSD had the highest proportion of persons in the 15-29 years age group (23.0%) and Wimmera had the lowest proportion (16.2%). East Gippsland had the highest proportion of persons in the 30-64 years age group (46%) and the Central Highlands had the lowest (43.4%). Wimmera had the highest proportion of persons in the 65-84 years and 85 years-and-over age groups (15.8% and 2.3% respectively). The MSD had the lowest proportion of persons in the 65-84 years and 85 years-and-over age groups (10.8% and 1.3% respectively).

Melbourne Statistical Division Population Growth

The MSD SLAs with the strongest growth in the 12 months to 30 June 2000 were, Melton (S)- East (44.7%), Melbourne (C)- Inner (36.4%), Melbourne (C)- Southbank-Docklands (34.3%), and Wyndham (C) Bal (24.2%). The SLAs of Hume (C)- Craigieburn, Casey (C)- Berwick and Knox (C)- South also had strong growth at 9.5%, 8.6% and 6.8% respectively.

Some MSD SLAs experienced a decline. Those which declined more than or equal to 0.2% include: Moreland (C)- Coburg which declined by 320 persons (0.7%), Moreland (C)- North by 280 persons (0.2%) Moreland(C)- Brunswick by 230 persons (0.6%), Banyule (C)- North by 250 persons (0.5%), Kingston (C)- North by 340 persons (0.4%), Moonee Valley (C)- West
by 90 persons (0.2%) and Monash (C)- South-West by 90 persons (0.2%).

HIGH GROWTH SLAS, Melbourne Statistical Division
graph - HIGH GROWTH SLAS, Melbourne Statistical Division
(a) Average annual growth rate


Rest of Victoria Population Growth

In the rest of Victoria during the 12 months to 30 June 2000, SLAs that experienced strong growth were Greater Bendigo (C)- Strathfieldsaye (5.8%), Surf Coast (S)- East (5.0%), Golden Plains (S)- North-West (4.9%), Mitchell (S)- South (4.2%), Colac-Otway (S)- South (4.1%) and Bass Coast (S)- Phillip Is. (3.8%). Those SLAs in the rest of the state that experienced a relatively strong decline were Buloke (S)- South by 130 (3.4%), Buloke (S)- North by 120 (3.3%), Wellington (S)- Rosedale by 240 (3.3%) and Towong (S)- Pt B by 120 (3.0%).

SLAS WITH GREATEST GROWTH AND DECLINE, Rest of Victoria
graph - SLAS WITH GREATEST GROWTH AND DECLINE, Rest of Victoria
(a) Average annual growth rate

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