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1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2007  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 24/01/2007   
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Contents >> Service Industries >> Selected service industries

SELECTED SERVICE INDUSTRIES

The remainder of the chapter presents statistics obtained from regular surveys of retail trade and wholesale trade, and the 2004-05 surveys of clubs, pubs, taverns and bars, sports services and gambling services, conducted by the ABS.

RETAIL TRADE

The Retail trade industry comprises businesses primarily engaged in the sale of new or used goods to final consumers for personal or household consumption, or in selected repair activities such as repair of household equipment or motor vehicles.

The estimate of retail turnover includes the value of turnover from businesses such as supermarkets, clothing and department stores, as well as hospitality and selected service businesses such as cafes and restaurants, hotels and licensed clubs. It excludes motor vehicle retailing and services. In order to measure the actual expenditure of consumers, retail turnover is recorded from 1 July 2000 inclusive of the Goods and Services Tax.

Table 20.3 presents retail turnover for the period 2001-02 to 2005-06. Total retail turnover (in volume terms) increased by 20% between 2001-02 and 2005-06, representing an average annual growth rate of 5%.

The group representing the largest component of retail turnover (in current prices) in 2005-06 was Food retailing with 40% of total turnover. The next largest groups were Hospitality and services with 16% of total turnover and Household good retailing with a 15% share of total turnover.

Between 2004-05 and 2005-06 the turnover (in volume terms) of Household good retailing increased by 6%, Clothing and soft good retailing by 6%, Hospitality and services by 4% and Food retailing by 2%. Retail turnover for Other retailing fell by 4% and Recreational good retailing fell by 2%. Department stores had no significant change between these time periods.


20.3 RETAIL TURNOVER(a)

Industry(b)

Food
retailing
Department
stores
Clothing and
soft good
retailing
Household
good
retailing
Recreational
good
retailing
Other
retailing
Hospitality
and
services
Retail
turnover(c)
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m

2001-02
72,885
13,695
10,838
20,941
7,026
18,174
29,165
172,010
2002-03
75,283
14,528
11,498
23,344
7,199
19,023
30,180
180,636
2003-04
78,360
15,577
12,265
27,180
7,914
20,990
32,284
194,438
2004-05
80,371
16,283
13,242
29,929
8,300
21,279
31,832
201,236
2005-06
82,334
16,305
14,002
31,689
8,172
20,497
33,091
206,089

(a) Volume measures based on quarterly data. Reference year is 2004-05.
(b) Classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 1993 edition.
(c) Volume measures are not additive for years other than 2004-05 and 2005-06.
Source: Retail Trade, Australia (8501.0).


Graph 20.4 shows annual growth rates for total retail turnover (in volume terms) from 1995-96 to 2005-06. During this period the four years with the strongest annual growth were 2003-04 (8%), 1999-2000 and 2001-02 (6%) and 2002-03 (5%). The three years of weakest growth occurred in 1996-97 and 2000-01 (1%) and 2005-06 (2%). Growth in 2000-01 was affected by the unusual increase in the volume of goods sold in the June quarter 2000 prior to the introduction of The New Tax System on 1 July 2000.

20.4 RETAIL TURNOVER(a), Annual growth 20.4 RETAIL TURNOVER(a), Annual growth


In 2004-05 retail trade industry GVA (in current prices) was $53,946 million (m) or 6.1% of GDP.

WHOLESALE TRADE

The Wholesale trade industry covers those businesses involved in the sale of new or used goods to businesses or to institutional (including government) users. Graph 20.5 shows annual volume measures of total wholesale trade sales.

20.5 WHOLESALE SALES(a) 20.5 WHOLESALE SALES(a)


CLUBS

An important element of the tourism and hospitality sector, the Clubs industry covers organisations mainly engaged in the provision of hospitality services to members.

At the end of June 2005, there were 2,116 hospitality clubs operating in Australia (table 20.6). They comprised 1,816 clubs with gambling facilities and 300 clubs without gambling facilities. These organisations employed 63,734 people at 30 June 2005.

The total income of hospitality clubs in Australia in 2004-05 was $7,375m, with gambling the main source of income ($4,305m or 58% of total industry income). In 2004-05, hospitality clubs incurred total expenses of $6,764m, with labour costs being the most significant ($2,122m or 31% of total expenses). The total industry value added by these organisations was $4,086m, which is the equivalent of 0.5% of Australia's GDP for 2004–05.

Income grew by an average 5.1% per year between the 2000-01 and 2004-05 financial years, while expenditure grew at the rate of 4.5% per year for the same period. Operating profit before tax grew at an average annual rate of 13% per year (from $372m in 2000-01 to $613m in 2004-05).

PUBS, TAVERNS AND BARS

The Pubs, taverns and bars industry covers businesses which mainly sell alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises.

There were 3,454 businesses in the Pubs, taverns and bars industry at 30 June 2005 (table 20.6). These organisations employed 81,675 persons at 30 June 2005.

Total income for the industry in 2004-05 was $11,114m. The major sources of income were from the sale of liquor and other beverages ($6,706m or 60% of total income), and gambling income, which accounted for 24% of all income ($2,703m).

Total expenses of businesses in the industry were $10,370m during 2004–05, with the main items of expenditure being purchases of liquor and other beverages of $3,807m, followed by labour costs of $2,268m and gambling taxes and levies of $941m. The total industry value added by these businesses was $4,394m, which is the equivalent of 0.5% of Australia's GDP for 2004–05.

Income grew by an average 5.8% per year between 2000-01 and 2004-05, while expenditure grew at the rate of 6% per year over the same period. Operating profit before tax grew at an average annual rate of 2.3% per year (from $715m in 2000-01 to $784m in 2004-05).


20.6 CLUBS (HOSPITALITY) AND PUBS, TAVERNS AND BARS INDUSTRIES(a)

Units
2000-01
2004-05

CLUBS (HOSPITALITY)

Businesses at 30 Juneno.
2,911
2,116
Employment at 30 Juneno.
64,990
63,734
Income
Sale of liquor and other beverages$m
1,245.7
1,600.8
Takings from gambling$m
3,810.4
4,305.1
Takings from meals and food sales$m
529.9
726.4
Other$m
450.2
742.4
Total$m
6,036.2
7,374.7
Expenses
Labour costs$m
1,702.2
2,121.6
Poker/gaming machine and other gambling taxes and levies(b)$m
766.7
1,104.0
Purchases$m
902.6
1,132.8
Other$m
2,294.3
2,783.0
Total(c)$m
5,665.8
6,763.9
Operating profit before tax$m
372.1
612.7
Operating profit margin%
6.2
8.4
Industry value added$m
3,097.8
4,086.1

PUBS, TAVERNS AND BARS

Businesses at 30 Juneno.
4,003
3,454
Employment at 30 Juneno.
84,158
81,675
Income
Sale of liquor and other beverages$m
5,566.0
6,706.1
Takings from gambling$m
2,130.0
2,703.1
Takings from meals and food sales$m
815.2
1,200.6
Other income$m
371.2
504.5
Total$m
8,882.4
11,114.3
Expenses
Labour costs$m
1,760.3
2,268.0
Poker/gaming machine and other gambling taxes and levies(b)$m
593.1
940.5
Purchases$m
3,732.1
4,476.5
Other$m
2,128.1
2,904.9
Total(c)$m
8,213.6
10,369.5
Operating profit before tax$m
715.2
784.2
Operating profit margin%
8.1
7.1
Industry value added$m
3,497.5
4,394.0

(a) Classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 1993 edition.
(b) Includes GST.
(c) As total expenses for 2004-05 do not include the GST paid on gambling products, total expenses will not be equal to the sum of the components.
Source: Clubs, Pubs, Taverns and Bars, Australia (8687.0).


SPORTS AND PHYSICAL RECREATION SERVICES

The ABS conducted a survey of businesses and organisations mainly engaged in sports and physical recreation services in 2004–05.

At the end of June 2005, there were 9,256 businesses/organisations operating in Australia whose main activity was the provision of sports and physical recreation services (table 20.7). This included 600 government organisations. 'For profit' businesses accounted for 54% of the total businesses/organisations, while 'not for profit' and government organisations accounted for 39% and 6.5% respectively. Non-employing businesses/organisations comprised 12% of the total.

At the end of June 2005, total employment in sports and physical recreation services was 111,519 people. In addition, there were 181,832 volunteers during the month of June 2005. The 600 government organisations employed 11, 051 persons.

During 2004–05, income generated by businesses/organisations engaged in sports and physical recreation services was $8,821m. The highest single income items were government funding ($1,564m or 18% of total income), sports membership and competition fees ($1,306m or 15% of total income) and sponsorship and fundraising ($806m or 9.1% of total income). Government organisations received $1,478m in income for the provision of sports and physical recreation services. The majority of this income ($1,176m or 80%) was received as operational and capital funding from government or as council reimbursements.

Total expenses incurred for the same period were $8,417m. Overall, labour costs were the highest single item contributing to total expenses, accounting for 29% ($2,465m) of total expenses, followed by grants, distributions and affiliation fees ($873m or 10%) and prize money and trophies ($582m or 6.9%). The total industry value added by sports and physical recreation services was $2,350m, which is the equivalent of 0.3% of Australia's GDP for 2004–05.

In 2004–05, sports and physical recreation services recorded an operating profit/surplus before tax of $389m and an operating profit margin of 6.9%.


20.7 SPORTS AND PHYSICAL RECREATION SERVICES, By sector - 2004-05

Units
For profit
Not for
profit
Government
organisations
Total

Businesses/organisations at 30 Juneno.
5,007
3,649
600
9,256
Employment at 30 Juneno.
53,917
46,552
11,051
111,519
Volunteers during the month of Juneno.
**7,480
174,351
-
181,832
Income
Government funding$m
45.9
341.8
1,175.9
1,563.6
Other grants, distributions and affiliation fees$m
*33.1
362.1
-
395.3
Sponsorship and fundraising$m
*251.4
548.0
6.6
806.0
Casual playing fees$m
330.5
*115.0
-
445.5
Sports membership and competition fees$m
702.8
603.0
-
1,305.7
Admissions to sporting events$m
*52.6
357.7
191.9
602.2
Rent, leasing and hiring of sports grounds and facilities$m
78.5
*85.4
50.6
214.5
Television and other broadcasting rights$m
-
292.6
-
292.6
Other$m
1,239.4
1,902.8
52.8
3,195.0
Total(a)$m
2,734.1
4,608.5
1,477.9
8,820.5
Expenses
Labour costs(b)$m
916.3
1,229.4
318.8
2,464.5
Grants, distributions and affiliation fees$m
28.1
340.9
503.7
872.7
Repair and maintenance$m
90.6
147.1
172.6
410.3
Rent, leasing and hiring of sporting venues, facilities and equipment$m
221.2
81.2
-
302.4
Gambling taxes and levies(c)$m
2.7
8.2
-
10.9
Other$m
1,312.7
2,584.7
462.7
4,360.1
Total(d)$m
2,570.3
4,388.4
1,457.8
8,416.5

(a) Includes capital funding.
(b) For government organisations, labour costs include wages and salaries only.
(c) Includes GST paid on gambling products.
(d) As total expenses do not include the GST paid on gambling products, total expenses will not be equal to the sum of the components.
Source: Sports and Physical Recreation Services, Australia, 2004-05 (8686.0).


GAMBLING SERVICES

Table 20.8 shows selected indicators for Gambling services industries. ‘Other gambling services’ includes businesses involved in the provision of gambling services such as book making and totalisator services, and gambling via the Internet.

There were 806 businesses in the Gambling services industries at 30 June 2005 (table 20.8). These organisations employed 30,094 people at 30 June 2005.

Total income (net of pay-outs to players) for the industry in 2004-05 was $10,569.8m. Income for casinos was $3,348.4m (32% of total income), while income for lotteries was $1,854.4m (18% of total income). Total net takings from gambling was $9,275.5m, of which casinos accounted for $2,582.2m and lotteries $1,690.2m.

In 2004–05, lotteries recorded an operating profit before tax of $1,680.8m and an operating profit margin of 16.2%.


20.8 GAMBLING SERVICES INDUSTRIES(a), Selected industries - 2004-05

Units
Lotteries
Casinos
Other gambling
services
Total

Businesses at 30 Juneno.
232
13
561
806
Employment at 30 Juneno.
2,243
18,347
9,504
30,094
Gambling
Net takings$m
1,690.2
2,582.2
5,003.1
9,275.5
Commissions$m
45.0
2.2
77.3
124.5
Total$m
1,735.2
2,584.5
5,080.4
9,400.1
Total income (net of pay-outs to players)$m
1,854.4
3,348.4
5,367.0
10,569.8
Operating profit before tax$m
151.9
767.3
761.6
1,680.8
Operating profit margin%
8.4
23.4
14.4
16.2

(a) Classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 1993 edition.
Source: Gambling Services, Australia (8684.0).


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