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1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2007  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 24/01/2007   
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Contents >> Crime and Justice >> Article - Crime victimisation

CRIME VICTIMISATION

The National Crime and Safety Survey (NCSS), conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) during April to July 2005, obtained information on the level of crime victimisation in the community. Information was collected from individuals and households about their experience of selected crimes, whether these crimes were reported to police and crime-related risk factors in the twelve months prior to the survey.

Households and individuals in Australia experience a diverse range of crimes. However, only the more serious crimes were covered by the NCSS. These included household crimes comprising break-in, attempted break-in and motor vehicle theft; and personal crimes comprising robbery, assault and sexual assault.

Victimisation prevalence rates used in this section refer to the proportion of persons or households experiencing an offence in the twelve months prior to the survey, in a given population, expressed as a percentage of that population.

VICTIMS OF CRIME

Households

There were 7,855,600 households in Australia in April 2005. In the twelve months prior to the survey:

  • 259,800 (3.3%) households were victims of at least one break-in to their home, garage or shed
  • 205,400 (2.6%) households had at least one attempted break-in
  • 427,100 (5.4%) households overall were victims of either a break-in or an attempted break-in
  • 74,800 (1%) households had at least one motor vehicle stolen (graph 11.4).

In total, 488,200 households were victims of one or more of these selected household crimes, equating to an overall household victimisation prevalence rate of 6.2%.

People aged 15 years and over

In April 2005, there were 15,966,900 people aged 15 years and over living in private dwellings in Australia. In the twelve months prior to the survey:
  • 58,900 (0.4%) people were victims of at least one robbery
  • 770,600 (4.8%) people were victims of at least one assault
  • 44,100 (0.3%) people aged 18 years and over were victims of at least one sexual assault (graph 11.4).

In total 841,500 people aged 15 years and over were victims of one or more of these selected personal crimes, equating to an overall personal victimisation prevalence rate of 5.3%.

11.4 CRIME VICTIMISATION RATES - 2005 11.4 CRIME VICTIMISATION RATES - 2005



HOW MUCH CRIME IS REPORTED TO POLICE?

Crime is not always reported to the police, and many factors influence whether or not a crime is reported. The proportion of victims who reported the most recent incident to police varied depending on the type of offence. Household crimes were more likely to be reported to police than personal crimes. In 2005, 74% of household victims of break-in and 90% of household victims of motor vehicle theft reported the most recent incident to the police, compared with 38% of robbery victims and 31% of assault victims (graph 11.5).


11.5 CRIME REPORTING RATES(a) - 2005 11.5 CRIME REPORTING RATES(a) - 2005


HOW SAFE DO PEOPLE FEEL?

Approximately 82% of persons felt safe or very safe when at home alone during the day, compared with 72% feeling this way after dark. Conversely, 4.0% of persons felt unsafe or very unsafe when at home alone during the day, compared with 8.3% at home alone after dark (graph 11.6).

11.6 FEELINGS OF SAFETY AT HOME ALONE - 2005 11.6 FEELINGS OF SAFETY AT HOME ALONE - 2005


Men and women differed in their perceptions of safety, particularly after dark. Around 80% of men compared with 64% of women felt safe or very safe when at home alone. Feelings of safety also varied according to age, with 84% of persons aged 15-19 years and 83% of persons aged 20-24 years feeling safe or very safe when at home alone during the day, compared with 78% of persons aged 65 years and over.

PEOPLE'S PERCEPTIONS OF NEIGHBOURHOOD PROBLEMS

Overall, around 70% of people aged 15 years and over perceived that there were problems from crime and/or public nuisance in their neighbourhoods. The most commonly perceived problem was dangerous/noisy driving (40% perceived this as a problem). Other commonly perceived problems were housebreaking/ burglaries/theft from homes (33%) and vandalism/graffiti/damage to property (25%) (graph 11.7).

11.7 NEIGHBOURHOOD PROBLEMS - 2005 11.7 NEIGHBOURHOOD PROBLEMS - 2005


REFERENCE
Crime and Safety, Australia, April 2005 (4509.0)

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