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4156.0 - Sport and Recreation: A Statistical Overview, Australia , 2006 Edition 2  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 10/11/2006   
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Contents >> Chapter 14.1 Other Leisure Products - Introduction >> Chapter 14.5 Other Leisure Products - International Trade in Other Leisure Products

OTHER LEISURE PRODUCTS

INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN OTHER LEISURE PRODUCTS

One other leisure product which could not be included in the international trade tables was Recorded media for computer games. This is because, within the trade data, recorded media containing these games cannot be separately identified from recorded media containing general software. A product which should have been included in the tables relating to sports and physical recreation (see Products) rather than other leisure was Automatic bowling alley equipment. However, this equipment could not be separately identified because it is included in the trade data as part of the category Other articles for funfair, table or parlour games. This category consists largely of other leisure products. Hence, it has been necessary to include Automatic bowling alley equipment in the tables relating to other leisure as part of Other articles for funfair, table or parlour games.


Australia's trade in the selected other leisure goods is in deficit. Imports of these goods during 2001-02 were valued at $969.6m. This is almost seven times the $140.4m in other leisure goods which was exported during that year. Poker machines and other coin or disc operated games ($55.7m) and Video games of a kind used with a television receiver ($32.7m) were the main contributors to the overall export figure and together accounted for 63% of the total. The product categories contributing the most to imports were Puzzles and other toys ($344.8m), Video games of a kind used with a television receiver ($185.1m) and Dolls and toys representing human beings, animals or non-human creatures ($180.1m). Their combined contribution to total imports was 73%.


The main source of imported other leisure goods during 2001-02 was China ($498.2m) which accounted for over half of all imports of these goods. New Zealand was the largest overseas market for Australian other leisure goods ($51.3m). Its purchases contributed 37% to total other leisure exports.


Exports of other leisure goods

Other leisure goods exported from Australia during 2001-02 were valued at $140.4m, which was down 16.4% from the $167.9m recorded for 2000-01 (at current prices), but still 13.6% up from the previous high point of $123.6m recorded a year earlier.


The product categories Poker machines and other coin or disc operated games, and Video games of a kind used with a television receiver have, since 1997-98, been the dominant contributors to the total value of exports of the selected other leisure goods. During that time, their combined contribution has never been lower than 58%. At current prices, exports of Video games have increased each year since the 1995-96 figure of $3.2m, resulting in an overall tenfold increase by 2001-02. Exports of Poker machines, etc. fluctuated throughout the period since 1995-96, reaching a low of $35.5m in 1997-98 and a high of $90.5m in 2000-01. For 2001-02 the level has dropped 38.5% from the previous year to $55.7m.


Other product categories making substantial contributions to total exports over the years are Puzzles and other toys, and Other articles for funfair, table or parlour games (including automatic bowling alley equipment). For 2001-02 the levels of exports for these categories were $15.4m and $17.9m respectively.

14.4 EXPORTS OF SELECTED OTHER LEISURE GOODS(a)

1995-96
1996-97
1997-98
1998-99
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m

Trailers and semi-trailers of the caravan type, for housing or camping
2.9
3.3
3.6
1.7
1.5
2.0
1.8
Dolls' carriages and wheeled toys designed to be ridden by children
0.1
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.7
0.8
0.4
Dolls and toys representing human beings, animals or non-human creatures
4.8
4.1
4.5
5.1
5.1
6.0
5.5
Toy electric trains and their accessories; scale model assembly kits and other constructional toys
2.6
2.4
1.9
1.4
2.3
2.6
3.5
Puzzles and other toys
9.8
12.3
13.7
13.4
11.8
12.4
15.4
Playing cards
1.4
2.0
1.2
0.9
3.5
2.4
4.7
Video games of a kind used with a television receiver
3.2
3.8
16.4
22.0
23.7
29.6
32.7
Poker machines and other coin or disc operated games
48.0
36.4
35.5
39.7
59.6
90.5
55.7
Other articles for funfair, table or parlour games (incl. automatic bowling alley equipment)
33.1
12.2
9.6
13.6
12.8
20.0
17.9
Fairground amusements such as merry-go-rounds, swings, and shooting galleries
13.1
6.6
1.9
2.2
2.5
1.4
2.9
Total
119.0
83.3
88.5
100.4
123.6
167.9
140.4

(a) All data are presented in Australian dollars using 'Free on Board' valuations.
Source: International Trade, Australia: FASTTRACCS Service - Electronic Delivery, 2003 (cat. no. 5460.0).


Destination of exports

Throughout the period 1995-96 to 2001-02, New Zealand has been the largest market for other leisure goods exported from Australia. It has received between 26.2% (1995-96) and 40.6%(1999-2000) of all exports of these goods during those years. However, the United States of America and, more recently, Singapore have also been important markets. In 2001-02, the three countries together received goods worth $91.3m. This was 65.0% of all exports of selected other leisure goods for that year.


After averaging $16.9m for the years 1995-96 to 1999-2000, exports to the United States of America rose to $34.4m in 2000-01. However, the level has since dropped back to $19.6m in 2001-02. Exports to Singapore were averaging $6.5m before rising to $21.2m in 2000-01. The level for 2001-02 was little changed at $20.4m.

14.5 DESTINATION OF EXPORTS OF SELECTED OTHER LEISURE GOODS(a)

1995-96
1996-97
1997-98
1998-99
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
Country of destination
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m

New Zealand
31.2
25.8
29.3
33.9
50.1
52.2
51.3
Singapore
5.8
5.1
4.3
8.6
8.8
21.2
20.4
United States of America
17.1
17.9
16.9
16.0
16.7
34.4
19.6
Hong Kong (SAR of China)
3.0
5.1
14.4
10.8
13.8
14.0
9.7
United Kingdom
2.6
3.1
3.2
9.1
12.5
8.4
8.3
Philippines
0.8
3.2
0.7
1.1
0.7
2.3
6.6
Malaysia
1.3
0.9
2.0
1.9
2.8
14.5
5.7
South Africa
0.7
0.4
1.6
5.6
3.0
6.4
3.4
Germany
4.9
1.4
0.5
1.8
0.2
0.6
1.8
Japan
22.6
2.1
2.6
2.7
2.2
2.8
1.7
Peru
-
0.1
-
-
-
0.4
1.6
Netherlands
8.9
1.1
1.4
2.3
4.0
1.0
1.0
Other countries
20.1
17.0
11.4
6.6
9.0
9.6
9.1
Total
119.0
83.3
88.5
100.4
123.6
167.9
140.4

- nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)
(a) All data are presented in Australian dollars using 'Free on Board' valuations.
Source: International Trade, Australia: FASTTRACCS Service - Electronic Delivery, 2003 (cat. no. 5460.0).


Imports of other leisure goods

The value (at current prices) of other leisure goods imported into Australia increased with each successive year from $508.3m in 1995-96 to $969.6m in 2001-02, for an average annual increase of 11.6% over the period.


In every year, Puzzles and other toys was the product category which contributed most to total imports of other leisure goods. The other category which appeared in the top three each year was Dolls and toys representing human beings, animals or non-human creatures. Video games of a kind used with a television receiver was the only other category to make the top three for more than one year. Together, these three product categories accounted for 73.2% ($710.0m) of total imports of other leisure goods in 2001-02. Their contribution in other years ranged from 65.3% in 1995-96 to 74.9% in 1998-99.


At current prices, the value of imports of Puzzles and other toys has increased each year with the result that the 2001-02 figure of $344.8m is close to double the 1995-96 figure of $176.4m. For Dolls and toys representing human beings, animals or non-human creatures, the movement in value of imports has been generally upward to the 2001-02 level of $180.1m. The only exception was a 2.1% fall to $150.4m in 1999-2000. This was more than recovered with the following year's rise to $160.2m. In 2001-02, the value of imports was 73.8% higher than it was in 1995-96 ($103.6m).


Imports of Video games of a kind used with a television receiver rose each year from 1995-96 to the 1998-99 figure of $139.8m, more than two and a half times what it was in 1995-96 ($52.2m). However, over the next two years, the level of imports fell by over 50% to be $66.3m in 2000-01. It then jumped to $185.1m in 2001-02, 32.4% up on the previous high point three years earlier.

14.6 IMPORTS OF SELECTED OTHER LEISURE GOODS(a)

1995-96
1996-97
1997-98
1998-99
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m

Trailers and semi-trailers of the caravan type, for housing or camping
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.7
Dolls' carriages and wheeled toys designed to be ridden by children
8.7
9.3
10.2
14.7
18.1
27.4
19.1
Dolls and toys representing human beings, animals or non-human creatures
103.6
107.9
149.0
153.7
150.4
160.2
180.1
Toy electric trains and their accessories; scale model assembly kits and other constructional toys
37.6
40.6
35.5
39.4
38.4
46.3
65.9
Puzzles and other toys
176.4
212.7
217.0
229.6
252.0
320.3
344.8
Playing cards
1.8
2.1
2.1
2.4
5.5
4.4
4.4
Video games of a kind used with a television receiver
52.2
71.5
126.2
139.8
89.4
66.3
185.1
Poker machines and other coin or disc operated games
56.4
45.2
41.4
42.7
51.2
97.7
72.8
Other articles for funfair, table or parlour games (incl. automatic bowling alley equipment)
61.8
65.4
84.9
64.4
105.1
83.0
85.6
Fairground amusements such as merry-go-rounds, swings, and shooting galleries
9.7
8.4
5.5
11.5
5.5
5.6
11.3
Total
508.3
563.3
672.1
698.5
715.8
811.6
969.6

(a) All data are presented in Australian dollars using the Australian Customs Value.
Source: International Trade, Australia: FASTTRACCS Service - Electronic Delivery, 2003 (cat. no. 5460.0).


Origin of imports

Throughout the period 1995-96 to 2001-02, China has been the largest source of other leisure goods imported into Australia. Its figure of $498.2m for 2001-02 was five times higher than the $97.3m worth of other leisure goods imported from the second largest source, the United States of America. Nevertheless, the United States of America and also Japan have been significant sources of other leisure imports throughout the seven year period. In terms of import value, these countries and China made up the top three for each of the seven years. For 2001-02, the combined other leisure imports sourced from the top three amounted to $683.9m, which was 70.5% of the total imports of these goods. In previous years their contribution had been even higher, peaking at 78.6% in 1997-98.


At current prices, imports from China have increased each year and in, 2001-02, were more than double the level of $233.8m recorded for 1995-96. The level of imports from the United States of America has fluctuated over the seven years. The $97.3m achieved for 2001-02 was down 23.3% from the high of $126.8m recorded the previous year. The lowest import level occurred in 1997-98 ($59.8m).


The value of imports from Japan increased each year until it reached $151.5m in 1998-99, almost two and a half times higher than the 1995-96 value of $62.7m. However, over the next two years the value fell by almost two thirds to be $53.6m in 2000-01 before recovering somewhat to $88.4m in 2001-02.


An isolated large order for a particular good can result in a country providing an unusually large level of imports for a particular year. One such case is the $68.0m of imports received from Hungary in 2001-02. After not having broken $0.5m in any of the preceding six years, orders for nearly $68m worth of Video games of a kind used with a television receiver made Hungary the fourth biggest source of imports of other leisure goods in 2001-02.

14.7 ORIGIN OF IMPORTS OF SELECTED OTHER LEISURE GOODS(a)

1995-96
1996-97
1997-98
1998-99
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
Country of origin
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m

China
233.8
254.2
328.1
331.8
346.9
456.0
498.2
United States of America
71.3
65.0
59.8
64.0
99.0
126.8
97.3
Japan
62.7
90.8
140.0
151.5
100.7
53.6
88.4
Hungary
-
0.4
0.2
-
-
-
68.0
Hong Kong (SAR of China)
11.1
14.8
19.3
19.2
25.8
28.1
33.1
United Kingdom
17.5
21.2
20.3
18.6
19.6
18.8
22.2
Taiwan
18.8
17.1
15.7
18.8
19.2
20.7
21.4
Denmark
10.3
12.4
9.3
14.0
9.9
11.4
18.4
Germany
5.9
4.9
5.2
7.0
6.6
7.0
18.0
Switzerland
6.2
8.5
5.1
5.3
10.0
12.8
14.3
Korea, Republic of
3.3
2.8
2.3
8.3
6.2
7.2
10.8
Malaysia
6.7
5.2
5.6
5.4
3.8
4.4
10.4
Other countries
60.7
65.9
61.1
54.6
68.1
64.7
69.0
Total
508.3
563.3
672.1
698.5
715.8
811.6
969.6

- nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)
(a) All data are presented in Australian dollars using the Australian Customs Value.
Source: International Trade, Australia: FASTTRACCS Service - Electronic Delivery, 2003 (cat. no. 5460.0).


Balance of trade in other leisure goods

The countries which appear on the graph below were Australia's major trading partners in the selected other leisure goods for 2001-02. That is, they were the countries with which total transactions (exports and imports) were greatest. Australia had a trade deficit with most of these countries in 2001-02. By far the largest trade deficit was with China ($498.1m). This was followed by Japan ($86.7m), the United States of America ($77.7m) and Hungary ($68.0m). Australia's only trade surpluses with its major trading partners in other leisure goods were with New Zealand ($42.2m) and Singapore ($18.0m).

14.8 BALANCE OF TRADE IN SELECTED OTHER LEISURE GOODS - 2001-02
Graph: 14.8 BALANCE OF TRADE IN SELECTED OTHER LEISURE GOODS—2001–02



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