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6446.0.55.001 - Consumer Price Index: Correspondence with 2009-10 Household Expenditure Classification, Australia , 2011  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 26/10/2011   
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  • Explanatory Notes

This data cube is a spreadsheet that contains the Consumer Price Index Commodity Classification (CPICC), the 2009–10 Household Expenditure Classification (HEC) and the correspondences between them. Both the HEC and the Consumer Price Index Commodity Classification have a hierarchical structure; only the lowest levels of those structures are shown in this data cube (expenditure class for the CPICC and the 10 digit level for the HEC) as this is the level at which correspondences were established.

Table 1. Correspondence between 16th and 15th series CPI Commodity Classification shows the correspondence between the 16th and 15th series Consumer Price Index Commodity Classification (CPICC) at the expenditure class level.

Table 2. 2009–10 Household Expenditure Classification (HEC) (numerical and alphabetical order) shows the 2009–10 HEC 10 digit code and description in numerical and alphabetical order.

Table 3. 16th series CPI Commodity Classification (numerical and alphabetical order) Shows the 87 expenditure classes in the CPICC in numerical and alphabetical order.

Table 4. Correspondence between the 2009–10 HEC and the 16th series CPI Commodity Classification shows the correspondence between the HEC 10 digit code and the 87 expenditure classes in the CPICC. Where HEC codes could not be considered unique to a CPI expenditure class, they were split (or partitioned) over relevant CPI expenditure classes. Partitioning is indicated by either a "p" (proportional prorate) or a "f" (fixed split) between the HEC code and the descriptor.

Table 5. Correspondence between the 16th series CPI Commodity Classification and the 2009–10 HEC shows the correspondence between the CPICC 87 expenditure classes and the HEC 10 digit code. Where HEC codes could not be considered unique to a CPI expenditure class, they were split (or partitioned) over relevant CPI expenditure classes. Partitioning is indicated by either a "p" (proportional prorate) or a "f" (fixed split) between the HEC code and the descriptor.

Table 6. Changes between the 2003–04 HEC and the 2009–10 HEC shows a small number of HEC commodity code changes between the 2003–04 and 2009–10 HEC.


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