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4614.0.55.001 - Energy in Focus: Energy Use in Australian Homes, Mar 2010  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 26/03/2010  First Issue
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ENERGY USE IN AUSTRALIAN HOMES


The type and amount of energy used in the home has considerable implications for the environment. Home energy consumption is a significant contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in Australia due to the heavy reliance on fossil fuels, especially coal, to produce electricity.


Household energy use per person (including electricity, gas, wood, petrol etc.) rose between 2001–02 and 2005–06, and then fell from 2005–06 to 2006–07. A factor contributing to the drop in 2006–07 was a drop in the national use of refined products, such and petrol and diesel, despite a rising population.


1.1 AUSTRALIAN HOUSEHOLD ENERGY USE,
2001–02 to 2006–07

1.2 AUSTRALIAN HOUSEHOLD ELECTRICITY USE,
2001–02 to 2006–07


Practically all Australian homes (99.9%) use electricity. Electricity use per person rose nearly one-fifth (19%) throughout the period 2001–02 to 2006–07. Larger home sizes, more appliances and IT equipment in homes and increased use of heaters and coolers have contributed to this increase and resulting residential greenhouse gas emissions.


Gas was the second most common source of energy in Australian homes. The use of gas increased from 57% of homes in 2002 to 61% in March 2008. Across Australia, there has been a downward trend in the use of wood as a source of energy in homes, with use decreasing from 18% in 2002 to 14% in 2008. Solar energy was used by 7% of Australian homes for heating water in 2008. This was a 60% increase from 2005 when 4% of homes used solar energy for hot water systems.



1.3 SOURCES OF ENERGY IN AUSTRALIAN HOMES,
2005 and 2008



Almost nine in ten Australians said they took steps to limit their personal energy use in 2007–08. Women were more likely than men to take steps to limit their energy use (90% as opposed to 85%). People with a bachelor degree were most likely to take steps to limit their energy use (92%), compared to people without a non-school qualification (85%).



1.4 PEOPLE WHO CURRENTLY TAKE STEPS TO LIMIT PERSONAL ENERGY USE,
By age and sex


Of the people who did not take steps to limit their personal energy use, the main reason reported was that it was already low enough. People aged 18–24 years were less likely than other age groups to limit their use, with more than a quarter (26%) reporting that they did not limit their use.



1.5 REASONS PEOPLE DID NOT TAKE STEPS TO LIMIT PERSONAL ENERGY USE

Graph: Reasons people did not take steps to limit personal energy use


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