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4609.0.55.001 - Land Account: Great Barrier Reef Region, Experimental Estimates, 2011  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 28/02/2011  First Issue
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  • Explanatory Notes

EXPLANATORY NOTES


INTRODUCTION

1 The Land Account: Great Barrier Reef Regions, Experimental Estimates, 2011, is a pilot project that integrates environmental, economic and social data with spatial location information. It is presented in three parts; first as a series of tables for the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) Region and associated Natural Resource Management (NRM) Regions, an interactive spatial layer using the Google Earth framework at the Statistical Area Level 1 (SA1) from the Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS) and a socio-economic spatial layer that can be used in GIS systems.

2 Land, as an asset, represents a major proportion of Australia's national economic value and nearly all economic activities involve the use of some land. This value was $3,614.4 billion in 2009-10 (Australian System of National Accounts - National Balance Sheet, cat. no. 5204.0). The land assets in Australia are owned (or leased) and used by governments, businesses and individuals for a variety of purposes and activities.

3 In Australia, land value is driven by physical characteristics such as location, vegetation cover, accessibility, climate, biodiversity, soils, mineral resources, etc. as well as other factors such as land zoning and man-made improvements applied to the land and surrounds. Areas of land with desirable characteristics attract competing demands from major land users (agriculture, industry, habitation, environmental protection, recreation). Use of land can also result in degradation or improvements to the asset over time.

4 The development of a National Land Account will be part of a set of integrated environmental-economic accounts to assist the development of effective policy in regard to land assets. A Land Account could be used to inform debate on:

  • population settlement;
  • sustainable production of goods and services;
  • understanding the costs and benefits of different land management decisions, including the impact on the carbon cycle, water availability and quality, distribution and abundance of native species;
  • understanding the productive capacity of the land used by the mining and agricultural industries;
  • measuring the health of the environment; and
  • understanding the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of activities occurring on the land.
  • measuring the potential social and economic impact of a disaster (flood, fire, cyclone)

5 Production of these experimental estimates has helped develop the concepts and methods that will be used to produce a set of Land Accounts and will also assist in reviewing the quality and limitations of the available data sources.

ENVIRONMENTAL-ECONOMIC ACCOUNTING FRAMEWORK

6 Environmental-economic accounting is a method of integrating environmental data with economic and, to a lesser degree, social data. The System of Integrated Environmental and Economic Accounting (SEEA) is an environmental-economic accounting framework being developed by the United Nations Statistics Division. The Land Account: Great Barrier Reef Regions, Experimental Estimates, 2011 has been produced in accordance with the SEEA and will follow previous ABS environmental-economic accounting publications utilising this system - Energy Account, Australia, 2006-07 (cat. no. 4604.0) and Water Account, Australia, 2008-09 (cat. no. 4610.0).

7 For further information on environmental-economic accounting please refer to the ABS Information Papers: What are Environmental Accounts?, 2008 (cat. no 4655.0.55.001) and Towards an Integrated Environmental-Economic Account for Australia, 2010 (cat. no 4655.0.55.001), and the United Nations Statistical Division.

SCOPE AND COVERAGE

8 The GBR Region was selected for these experimental estimates as there was significant information available about this region from the work undertaken around the recent ABS publication, Land Management Practices in the Great Barrier Reef Catchments, final, 2008-09 (cat. no. 4619.0.55.001).

9 The GBR region comprises the following five NRM regions which lie adjacent to and drain into the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) or lagoon: The Wet Tropics; Burdekin; Mackay Whitsunday; Fitzroy; and Burnett Mary. Map 1 shows the GBR region.

10 With the exception of 1750 pre-European land cover the data used to produce this publication relates to periods from 1997 to 2009.

DATA SOURCES

11 This publication was produced using information from a number of Commonwealth and State Government Departments and the ABS gratefully acknowledges the assistance provided by these agencies. The non ABS data sources are listed below.
  • Cadlite, November 2008 - Public Sector Mapping Agencies (PSMA). This spatial dataset contains land parcel information from across Australia and includes names of suburbs and boundary locations. It is a graphical index of digital cadastral boundaries, excluding easements and road drainage easements. Further information is available from the PSMA web site: http://www.psma.com.au/.
  • Climate data - Bureau of Meteorology (BoM). Climate data including total rainfall 2008-09 and average temperature 2008-09. Further information is available from the BoM web site: http://www.bom.gov.au/.
  • Dynamic Land Cover Mapping - Geoscience Australia (GA) in collaboration with the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES). Geoscience Australia (GA) provided a draft version of the Dynamic Land Cover Map for the Great Barrier Reef Region. The Dynamic Land Cover Dataset of Australia is the first nationally consistent and thematically comprehensive land cover reference for Australia. It is the result of a collaboration between GA and ABARES, and provides a base-line for identifying and reporting on change and trends in vegetation cover and extent.

    The Dynamic Land Cover Dataset includes 186 snapshots of vegetation greenness for each 250m by 250m area of the country from April 2000 to April 2008. The classification scheme used to describe land cover categories in the Dynamic Land Cover Dataset conforms to the 2007 International Standards Organisation (ISO) land cover standard (19144-2). The Dynamic Land Cover Dataset shows Australia land cover clustered into 34 ISO classes. These reflect the structural character of vegetation, ranging from cultivated and managed land covers (crops and pastures) to natural land covers such as closed forest and sparse, open grasslands.

    The source data for the Dynamic Land Cover Dataset is a time series of Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra and Aqua satellites operated by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

    Further information is available from the GA web site http://www.ga.gov.au/.
  • Forest Extent and Change (Version 6) - Australian Government Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE). Landsat (satellite) imagery from 1972-2009 was used to discriminate between forest and non-forest cover by measuring the forest cover in two consecutive epochs and subtracting one from the other. Further information is available from the DCCEE website: http://www.climatechange.gov.au/.

    A forest is defined as vegetation with a minimum 20 per cent canopy cover, potentially reaching 2 metres high and a minimum area of 0.2 hectares. Landsat satellite imagery was used to discriminate between forest and non-forest cover. The probability of forest cover is mapped across Australia at a 25-metre resolution from Landsat imagery. Regionally appropriate thresholds are placed on these forest probabilities to create forest extent data. Differencing consecutive epochs allows the creation of both deforestation and regrowth layers. The attributed change products identify human induced change resulting in a change in the land use such as forest clearing for agricultural purposes. It does not include temporary changes to the forest such as fire.

    The dataset is currently updated annually. This update involves the addition of another year of data; the re-processing of all preceding years; as well as the incorporation of methodological improvements. The Queensland Herbarium within the Queensland Government Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM) is also acknowledged as the state custodian for vegetation information.

    For further information see National Carbon Accounting System (NCAS) Technical Report No. 9 "Land Cover Change: Specifications for Remote Sensing Analysis" for details of the analytical methodology or contact:

    GIS Manager
    National Carbon Accounting System - NCAS
    Department of Climate Change & Energy Efficiency
    GPO Box 854
    CANBERRA ACT 2601
  • Catchment Scale Land Use of Australia, March 2010 - Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES). Land use mapping was used at two scales: national scale (1:2,500,000) and catchment scale (1:25,000) using the Australian Land Use and Management (ALUM) classification. Further information is available from the ABARES web site: http://www.abares.gov.au/.
  • North Australian Fire Information (NAFI). SA1 level fire frequency data showing the number of hectares burnt one or more times (maximum of 5) between 1997 and 2008 was provided by North Australian Fire Information (NAFI) . The data includes any controlled burns. Further information is available at the NAFI web site: http://www.firenorth.org.au/nafi2/
  • Queensland Government Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM). Information on land use classifications and land values for land parcels. Further information is available from the DERM web site: http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/.
  • Transport and Topography - Public Sector Mapping Agencies (PSMA). A spatial dataset containing information on transport (including roads, railways etc), hydrology and green space. Further information is available from the PSMA web site: http://www.psma.com.au/.
  • Important Wetlands in Australia- Queensland Government Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM) in partnership with the Australian Government Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (SEWPaC). The Queensland Wetlands Program provided a range of information on wetlands for this region. Further information can be found at the DERM web site: http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/.

12 Data from ABS collections has been integrated into this release and includes information from:

GEOGRAPHY
13 This publication uses the new Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS), containing boundaries, labels and codes for the new Statistical Area (SA) units and capital cities. The ASGS will effectively replace the current Australian Standard Geographic Classification (ASGC) from July 2011.

14 The ASGS Statistical Area Level 1 (SA1) has been used as the base layer for producing spatial information for this publication. SA1's have an average population of approximately 400 and will be used in the 2011 Census of Population and Housing and the 2010-11 Agricultural Census. For further information please refer to the ABS website - http://www.abs.gov.au/.

METHODOLOGY

Main Tables

15 The methodology for producing each of the tables in this publication is outlined below:

Table 1: Land Use by Sector (hectares), 2008-09.

16 This table was compiled using the land parcel metrics from the Queensland Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM) - property ID, land use code and area - and applying them to the cadastral layer from the Public Sector Mapping Agencies (PSMA). Business data were allocated to a cadastral parcel for those businesses with a registered business address in the region and an active ABN. The industry (ANZSIC) of the ABN was applied to the cadastral parcel to provide information by Sector.

17 The following should be noted when interpreting the data:
  • Where a cadastral parcel has a centroid that is outside the GBR region boundary that parcel has not been included in any of the SA1 output. Conversely, where a cadastral parcel has its centroid inside a NRM boundary the entire parcel is included even though part of the parcel lies outside the NRM boundary. However NRM level output does includes all SA1s and parts of SA1s that lie within the NRM boundary. This can be seen in Map 1.
  • For this release a "business" has an active ABN with a registered business address within the published region. It should be noted this does not necessarily mean that the business is trading or operating in the region. Conversely, businesses trading in the region but with their registered business address outside the region, are excluded from this release.
  • Where the registered business address for an ABN contained inadequate address information, not all land parcels were able to be directly allocated to a particular business. Depending on the amount of information in the address, these businesses were allocated to a street or a locality/suburb where possible and then assigned to a cadastral parcel. Where a business owned more than one land parcel the additional land parcels were attributed to the business. There were however some land parcels that could not be attributed and these are shown as "unallocated " in the tables.
  • Some registered business addresses are the office of an accountant/lawyer or the residential address of the owner rather than the actual business location address. In these cases the business has retained the land use code of the registered business address.
  • Most business have simple business structures, i.e the one ABN undertakes all the operations of the business at the one location. However, some businesses have complex business structures with operations at multiple locations, multiple States or Territories and may have multiple ABNs (eg a supermarket or fast food chain). In these cases the registered address of each ABN was used to allocate the ABN to a land parcel and each ABN was assigned the 'industry' of the business enterprise group.
  • If any business owned a land parcel within the published region but had their registered business address outside the region, then that land parcel would be included in the "unallocated" sector in the tables.
  • Agricultural businesses have been wholly located to the SA1 where the main agricultural property is located, even where the agricultural business has agricultural property located across one or more SA1s.
  • The information on land parcels in the DERM data file may be updated at different time periods. This meant that some land parcels could not be allocated to a cadastre. These are shown as "no land use category" in the tables.
  • Road and rail length data was obtained from PSMA road and rail spatial layer. To derive an "area" of roads and rail the following assumptions were made. For National or State highways 20% of the road length was deemed to have a width of 20 metres (including verges) and 80% were deemed to be 13 metres wide (including verges). All other road types were deemed to be 10 metres wide (including verges). A rail width of 75 metres (including verges) was used to determine the area taken up by rail.
  • Where a cadastral parcel with a rateable land value was identified as being in a State forest or under a water body, the land use was deemed to be "green space" or "water bodies".

18 Appendix 1 shows the concordance between the detailed DERM land use categories and the published land use categories.

Table 2 : Land Use by Sector (rateable value), 2008-09.

19 The compilation of this table is identical to Table 1 except that this table shows the rateable value of the cadastral parcel.

20 The following should be noted when interpreting the data:
  • The value of the land as shown in this release has been obtained from DERM. The valuation is based on the Valuation of Land Act 1944. In September 2010 this act was replaced by the Land Valuation Act 2010. Land valuations for the purposes of land tax and council rates are now valued using the "site value" method, whereas previously (and in this release) land was valued under the "unimproved value" method.
  • Some land parcels, mainly owned by the Commonwealth, State or Local Government, did not have a rateable land value.

Table 3: Land Use Classified by the Australian Collaborative Land Use Mapping Programme (ACLUMP) by Sector (hectares), 2004.

21 The data in this table was compiled by using the PSMA cadastral layer and applying business data (active ABN's with a registered business address in the published region). The industry (ANZSIC) of the ABN was applied to the cadastral parcel. The cadastral parcel was overlaid with Catchment Scale Land Use Mapping provided by ABARES to produce estimates of hectares of land use by sector.

22 The following should be noted when interpreting the data:
  • Most of the Catchment Scale Land Use Mapping imagery was captured in 2004 but some coastal urban pockets were captured in 1999.
  • Any value of less than 0.25 hectares in area is less than the resolution of the ACLUMP data set and should be used with caution.

Table 4: Dynamic Land Cover by Sector (hectares), 2008.

23 The data in this table was compiled by using the PSMA cadastral layer and applying business data (active ABN's with a registered business address in the published regions). The industry (ANZSIC) of the ABN was applied to the cadastral parcel. The cadastral parcel was overlaid with the Dynamic Land Cover Mapping dataset provided by GA and ABARES to produce estimates of hectares of land use by sector.

24 It should be noted that any value of less than 6.25 hectares in area is less than the resolution of the data set and should be used with caution.

Table 5: Vegetation Cover 2006 and pre-1750.

25 The data in this table compares Vegetation Cover for 2006 to pre European Settlement. It was sourced from a National dataset contained in the ABARES Natural Resources Mapping Toolkit (2009), which is available at the ABARES web site: http://adl.brs.gov.au/mcass/toolkit.html.

Table 6. Forest Extent and Change 1998 to 2008.

26 The data in this table shows Forest Extent and Change at 1998, 2002 and 2008. It has been compiled and supplied by DCCEE.

Google Earth Spatial Layer

27 To produce the interactive spatial layer, a range of socioeconomic and environmental data was overlaid onto spatial boundaries at the SA1 and NRM level. This data was then exported into Google Earth to present data for each SA1 in the GBR region electronically. Please see Map 6 for a sample of the output.

28 A detailed description of each data item can be found in Appendix 2.

Confidentiality

29 Where appropriate, certain data has been suppressed to prevent the release of any information that may identify any individual or organisation.

CLASSIFICATIONS

30 The following classifications were used in this publication:
  • Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC)
  • Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS)
  • Australian Land Use and Management (ALUM)
  • Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification 2006 (ANZSIC)
  • International Standards Organisation Land Cover Classification (ISO 19144-2)
  • National Vegetation Information System - Information Hierarchy
  • Standard Economic Sector Classifications of Australia (SESCA)
  • Standard Institutional Sector Classification of Australia (SISCA)


RELATED PUBLICATIONS

31 Users may wish to refer to Land Management Practices in the Great Barrier Reef Catchments, final, 2008-09 (cat. no. 4619.0.55.001). This publication contains final detailed estimates of land management practices undertaken in the 28 catchments that flow into the GBR Marine Park, the same area covered in this experimental land account.

32 For further information on environmental accounting please refer to the ABS Information Paper: What are Environmental Accounts?, 2008 (cat. no 4655.0.55.001).

33 The Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS) (cat no. 1270.0.55.001) is the framework for understanding and interpreting the geographical context of statistics published by the ABS. From July 2011 the ABS will progressively replace the current Australian Statistical Geography Classification (ASGC) with the new Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS) as its geographical framework. Further information can be found at the Australian Bureau of Statistics website - http://www.abs.gov.au/.

34 Other ABS environmental-economic accounting publications which have been published in accordance with the System of Integrated Environmental and Economic Accounting (SEEA) are Water Account, Australia, 2008-09 (cat. no 4610.0) and Energy Account, Australia, 2006-07 (cat. no. 4604.0).

35 Land, timber and sub-soil assets are also included on the national balance sheet contained in the Australian System of National Accounts, (cat. no. 5204.0).

Other ABS publications related to this topic include:

GLOSSARY

Cadastre - A comprehensive National digital dataset of land parcels including their surveyed boundaries.

Centroid - The centroid is the centre of a digital bounded area, for example an SA1. This point is assigned a set of latitude and longitude coordinates. In some cases, such as a crescent-shaped area, the centroid may lie outside the limits of the area. (Adapted from Census Dictionary, 2006)

Forest - Vegetation with a minimum 20 per cent canopy cover, potentially reaching 2 metres high and a minimum area of 0.2 hectares.

Geocoding - Latitude and longitude coordinates for an address.

Land cover - Refers to the physical surface of the earth, including various combinations of vegetation types, soils, exposed rocks and water bodies as well as anthropogenic elements, such as agriculture and built environments. Land cover classes can usually be discriminated by characteristic patterns using remote sensing.

Land use - The purpose to which the land cover is committed. Some land uses, such as agriculture, have a characteristic land cover pattern. These usually appear in land cover classifications. Other land uses, such as nature conservation, are not readily discriminated by a characteristic land cover pattern. For example, where the land cover is woodland, land use may be timber production or nature conservation.

Land Management Practices - The approach taken to achieve a land use outcome - the 'how' of land use (eg cultivation practices, such as minimum tillage and direct drilling). Some land management practices, such as stubble disposal practices and tillage rotation systems, may be discriminated by characteristic land cover patterns and linked to particular issues.

Mesh Blocks - Mesh Blocks are the building block for all the larger regions of the ASGS. There are approximately 340,000 covering the whole of Australia. They broadly identify land use such as: residential, commercial, agriculture and parks etc. Residential and agricultural Mesh Blocks usually contain 30 to 60 households. Only limited Census data, total population and dwelling counts will be released at the mesh block level.
Natural Resource Management regions - 56 regions across Australia based on catchments and bioregions. Five of these regions fall within the Great Barrier Reef region.
Statistical Areas Level 1 (SA1s) - The smallest region for which a wide range of census data will be released. SA1's have an average population of approximately 400 and are built from whole Mesh Blocks.

Appendix 1:Concordance between DERM Primary Land Use codes and land use output tables


Land use category (as shown in Tables 1 and 2)DERM categoryDERM Primary Land Use code

AgricultureSheep Grazing60 Sheep Grazing-Dry
61 Sheep Breeding

Cattle Grazing64 Breeding
65 Breeding and Fattening
66 Fattening
67 Goats

Dairy Cattle68 Milk - Quota
69 Milk - No Quota
70 Cream

Agricultural71 Oil Seed
72 Section 25 Valuation
73 Grains
74 Turf Farms
75 Sugar Cane
76 Tobacco
77 Cotton
78 Rice
79 Orchards
80 Tropical Fruits
81 Pineapples
82 Vineyards
83 Small Crops & Fodder (irrigated)
84 Small Crops & Fodder (non - irrigated)

Other Rural Uses85 Pigs
86 Horses
87 Poultry
88 Forestry & Logs
89 Animal Special
93 Peanuts

Retail/Wholesale Retail Business/Commercial10 Comb. Multi Dwelling & Shops
11 Shop - Single
12 Shops - Group (more than 6 shops)
13 Shopping Group (2 to 6 shops)
14 Shops - Main Retail (Central Business District)
15 Shops - Second Retail (fringe central business presence of service ind)
16 Drive In Shopping Centre
17 Restaurant
18 Special Tourist Attraction
23 Retail Warehouse
24 Sales Area - Outdoors (dealers, boats , cars, etc)
25 Professional Offices
26 Funeral Parlours

Special Uses44 Nurseries (plants)

Transport/Storage Transport & Storage28 W'House & Bulk Stores
29 Transport Terminal
30 Service Station
31 Oil Depot & Refinery
32 Wharves
33 Builders Yard, Contractors
34 Cold Stores - Ice Works

IndustrialRetail Business/Commercial20 Marina

Industrial35 General Industry
36 Light Industry
37 Noxious/Offensive Industry (include abattoir)
38 Advertising - Hoarding
39 Harbour Industries
40 Extractive

Sport, Recreation, Accommodation Urban Land Use7 Guest House/Private Hotel

Special Uses42 Hotel/Tavern
43 Motel
45 Theatres/Cinemas
46 Drive In Theatre
47 Licensed Club
48 Sports Clubs/Facilities
49 Caravan Parks
50 Other Clubs (non-business)

Community ServicesRetail Business/Commercial21 Residential Institution (non medical care)
27 Hospitals, convalescent, homes (Medical care) (Private)

Special Uses41 Child Care - Excl Kindergarten
51 Religious
52 Cemeteries (Include Crematoria)
55 Library
56 Showground, Racecourse, Airfield
58 Educational incl. Kindergarten

General96 Public Hospital
97 Welfare home/institution
99 Community Protection Centre

OtherRetail Business/Commercial19 Walkway
22 Carparks

Special Uses57 Parks, Gardens

Other Rural Uses91 Transformers
92 Defence Force Establishment
95 Reservoir, Dam, Bores

ResidentialResidential2 Single Unit Dwelling
3 Multi Unit Dwelling (flats)
5 Large Home Site - Dwelling
6 Outbuildings
8 Building Format Plan - Primary Use Only
9 Standard Format Plan - Primary Use Only

UrbanUrban Land Use1 Vacant Urban Land

Residential4 Large Home Site - Vacant

RuralOther Rural UsesVacant Rural Land (excl 01& 04)



Appendix 2: Descriptions and definitions of SA1 level data

ThemeColumn nameUnitReference periodDefinition
1.1 Boundary informationSA1 identifying code ..A unique 7 digit hierarchical code that identifies each individual SA1 region.
1.1 Boundary informationArea of this SA1 regionhaThe area of this SA1 region.
1.1 Boundary informationNumber of Cadastral Parcelsno.2008-09The total number of cadastral parcels within this SA1 region.
1.1 Boundary informationArea of cadastral parcels%2008-09Proportion of total SA1 area.The total area of cadastral parcels within this SA1 region.
1.2 Population and businessABN countno.2010Count of active Australian Business Number's with a Registered Business Address in this SA1 region.
1.2 Population and businessEstimated Population, 2006no.2006Estimated Population within the SA1 as estimated from 2006 Population Census Data. Population ranges assembled for SA1's are a by-product of the mesh block and ASGS development process. The starting point for these population figures was the experimental mesh block dataset released after the 2006 Census of Population and Housing, since then mesh blocks have been split, merged and re-aligned and using input from other data sets ABS has maintained an indicative value for population in each new mesh block. These figures have been aggregated to SA1 and assigned a rank. While ABS has attempted to be as diligent as possible during this process users should be aware that there may be errors.
1.2 Population and businessEmployment Rangeno.variousEstimated number of employed persons within this SA1 region at time of registration of the ABN.
1.2 Population and businessGVIAP$,0002005-06Gross value of irrigated agricultural production within this SA1 region.
1.2 Population and businessGVAP$,0002005-06Gross value of agricultural production within this SA1 region.
1.2 Population and businessWater UseML2005-06Total water use is the sum of distributed water use, self extracted water use and reuse water use within this SA1 region.
2.1 Land use and rateable land value Rateable Value$m2008-09The total rateable value of cadastral parcels within this SA1.
2.1 Land use and rateable land value Agriculture%2008-09Proportion of total SA1 area. Includes primary DERM land use codes from Sheep Grazing, Cattle Grazing, Dairy Cattle, Agricultural, and Other Rural Land.
2.1 Land use and rateable land value Retail/Wholesale%2008-09Proportion of total SA1 area. Includes primary DERM land use codes from Retail Business and Commercial.
2.1 Land use and rateable land value Transport Storage%2008-09Proportion of total SA1 area. Includes primary DERM land use codes from Transport and Storage .
2.1 Land use and rateable land value Industrial%2008-09Proportion of total SA1 area. Includes primary DERM land use codes from Industrial (incl. extractive land uses)
2.1 Land use and rateable land value Sport, Recreation, Accommodation %2008-09Proportion of total SA1 area. Includes primary DERM land use codes from Special Uses.
2.1 Land use and rateable land value Community Services%2008-09Proportion of total SA1 area. Includes primary DERM land use codes from Special Uses and General.
2.1 Land use and rateable land value Residential%2008-09Proportion of total SA1 area. Includes primary DERM land use codes from Residential.
2.1 Land use and rateable land value Vacant Land - Urban%2008-09Proportion of total SA1 area. Includes primary DERM land use codes from Urban Land Use and Residential.
2.1 Land use and rateable land value Vacant Land - Rural%2008-09Proportion of total SA1 area. Includes primary DERM land use codes from Other Rural Uses.
2.1 Land use and rateable land value Other%2008-09Proportion of total SA1 area. Includes primary DERM land use codes from Retail Business/Commercial, Special Uses and Other Rural Uses.
2.1 Land use and rateable land value Total rateable area%2008-09Proportion of total SA1 area. The total percentage area of SA1 that has been allocated to a DERM record.
2.2 Land useConservation and Natural Environments %2004Proportion of total SA1 area. ALUM Classification. Land used primarily for conservation purposes, based on the maintenance of essentially natural ecosystems already present.
2.2 Land useProduction from Relatively Natural Environments%2004Proportion of total SA1 area. ALUM Classification. Land used used mainly for primary production, based on limited change to the native vegetation.
2.2 Land useProduction from Dryland Agriculture and Plantations %2004Proportion of total SA1 area. ALUM Classification. Land used mainly for primary production, based on dryland farming systems.
2.2 Land useProduction from Irrigated Agriculture and Plantations%2004Proportion of total SA1 area. ALUM Classification. Land used mainly for primary production, based on irrigated farming.
2.2 Land useIntensive uses%2004Proportion of total SA1 area. ALUM Classification Land subjected to substantial modification, generally in association with closer residential settlement, commercial or industrial uses.
2.2 Land useWater%2004Proportion of total SA1 area. ALUM Classification. Although primarily land cover types,water features are regarded as essential to the classification.
3 Dynamic land coverBare Areas%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily non-vegetated - Bare areas.
3 Dynamic land coverChenopod Shrubs - Sparse%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Natural and semi-natural terrestrial vegetation - Woody shrubs - Sparse chenopods.
3 Dynamic land coverExtraction Sites%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily non-vegetated - Artificial surfaces and associated areas - Non built up - Extraction sites.
3 Dynamic land coverHummock Grasses - Open%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - natural and semi-natural terrestrial vegetation - Herbaceous graminoids - Open - Hummock grasses.
3 Dynamic land coverHummock Grasses - Sparse%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Natural and semi-natural terrestrial vegetation - Herbaceous graminoids - Sparse hummock grasses.
3 Dynamic land coverInland water bodies%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily non-vegetated - Water bodies - Water.
3 Dynamic land coverIrrigated Cropping%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Cultivated and managed lands - Herbaceous graminoids - Irrigated.
3 Dynamic land coverIrrigated Pasture%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Cultivated and managed lands - Herbaceous graminoids - Irrigated pasture.
3 Dynamic land coverIrrigated Sugar%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Cultivated and managed lands - Herbaceous graminoids - Irrigated sugar.
3 Dynamic land coverRainfed Cropping%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Cultivated and managed lands - Herbaceous graminoids - Rain fed.
3 Dynamic land coverRainfed Pasture%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Cultivated and managed lands - Herbaceous graminoids - Rain fed pasture.
3 Dynamic land coverRainfed Sugar%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Cultivated and managed lands - Herbaceous graminoids - Rain fed sugar.
3 Dynamic land coverSalt Lakes%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily non-vegetated - Water bodies - Water - Brine.
3 Dynamic land coverShrubs - Closed%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Natural and semi-natural terrestrial vegetation - Woody shrubs - Closed.
3 Dynamic land coverShrubs - Open%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Natural and semi-natural terrestrial vegetation - Woody shrubs - Open.
3 Dynamic land coverShrubs - Scattered%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Natural and semi-natural terrestrial vegetation - Woody shrubs - Scattered.
3 Dynamic land coverShrubs - Sparse%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Natural and semi-natural terrestrial vegetation - Woody shrubs - Sparse.
3 Dynamic land coverTrees - Closed%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Natural and semi-natural terrestrial vegetation - Woody trees - Closed.
3 Dynamic land coverTrees - Open%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Natural and semi-natural terrestrial vegetation - Woody trees - Open.
3 Dynamic land coverTrees - Scattered%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Natural and semi-natural terrestrial vegetation - Woody trees - Scattered.
3 Dynamic land coverTrees - Sparse%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Natural and semi-natural terrestrial vegetation - Woody trees - Sparse.
3 Dynamic land coverTussock Grasses - Closed%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Natural and semi-natural terrestrial vegetation - Herbaceous Graminoids - Closed tussock grasses.
3 Dynamic land coverTussock Grasses - Open%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Natural and semi-natural terrestrial vegetation - Herbaceous Graminoids - Open tussock grasses.
3 Dynamic land coverTussock Grasses - Sparse%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Natural and semi-natural terrestrial vegetation - Herbaceous Graminoids - Sparse tussock grasses.
3 Dynamic land coverWetlands%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. ISO Classification 19144-2. Primarily vegetated - Natural and semi-natural aquatic vegetation.
3 Dynamic land coverUnclassified land%2008Proportion of total SA1 area. Areas that could not be classified.
4.1 FireHectares burnt between 1997-2008ha1997-2008The number of hectares burnt one or more times (maximum of 5) between 1997 and 2008 within this SA1 region.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Min Temperature,Winter 2008C2008The average daily minimum temperature within this SA1 region for the three month period (June, July, August) of Winter, 2008.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Max Temperature,Winter 2008C2008The average daily maximum temperature within this SA1 region for the three month period (June, July, August) of Winter, 2008.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Rainfall,Winter 2008mm2008The average daily rainfall within this SA1 region for the three month period (June, July, August) of Winter, 2008.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Min Temperature,Spring 2008C2008The average daily minimum temperature within this SA1 region for the three month period (September, October, November) of Spring, 2008.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Max Temperature,Spring 2008C2008The average daily maximum temperature within this SA1 region for the three month period (September, October, November) of Spring, 2008.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Rainfall,Spring 2008mm2008The average daily rainfall within this SA1 region for the three month period (September, October, November) of Spring, 2008.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Min Temperature,Summer 2008C2008The average daily minimum temperature within this SA1 region for the three month period (December, January, February) of Summer, 2008.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Max Temperature,Summer 2008C2008The average daily maximum temperature within this SA1 region for the three month period (December, January, February) of Summer, 2008.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Rainfall,Summer 2008mm2008The average daily rainfall within this SA1 region for the three month period (December, January, February) of Summer, 2008.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Min Temperature,Autumn 2009C2009The average daily minimum temperature within this SA1 region for the three month period (March, April, May) of Autumn, 2009.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Max Temperature,Autumn 2009C2009The average daily maximum temperature within this SA1 region for the three month period (March, April, May) of Autumn, 2009.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Rainfall,Autumn 2009mm2009The average daily rainfall within this SA1 region for the three month period (March, April, May) of Autumn, 2009.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Min Temperature,Winter 2009C2009The average daily minimum temperature within this SA1 region for the three month period (June, July, August) of Winter, 2009.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Max Temperature,Winter 2009C2009The average daily maximum temperature within this SA1 region for the three month period (June, July, August) of Winter, 2009.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Rainfall,Winter 2009mm2009The average daily rainfall within this SA1 region for the three month period (June, July, August) of Winter, 2009
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Min Temperature,Spring 2009C2009The average daily minimum temperature within this SA1 region for the three month period (September, October, November) of Spring, 2009.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Max Temperature,Spring 2009C2009The average daily maximum temperature within this SA1 region for the three month period (September, October, November) of Spring, 2009.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallAve Rainfall,Spring 2009mm2009The average daily rainfall within this SA1 region for the three month period (September, October, November) of Spring, 2009.
4.2 Temperature and rainfallNumber of modelling pointsno.2009Temperature and rainfall data is modelled using a grid of points approximately 5km apart, this is the number of these modelling points within this SA1 region. Temperature and rainfall data are only displayed when at least one modelling point exists in the SA1.





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